April 05, 2020, 05:35:53 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: For current weather conditions at Pinnacles, click here.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 05:34:45 PM 
Started by Tuff Chik - Last post by Tuff Chik

Vegan cake?

 Embarrassed

Yep - we worked together on a vegan carrot cake with icing.  Probably have it in about a half hour.

 2 
 on: Today at 05:24:23 PM 
Started by Tuff Chik - Last post by Brad Young
Happy birthday, John.

What a contrast to last year!

 3 
 on: Today at 05:16:41 PM 
Started by joe - Last post by F4?
Quote
That is anywhere from Marin to SLO for Joe.

The man needs to buy a car, you know, you sit in it, press a pedal and bam, you are moving.

 4 
 on: Today at 05:15:27 PM 
Started by Tuff Chik - Last post by F4?
Happy birthday old man!!

Vegan cake?

 Embarrassed

 5 
 on: Today at 05:00:39 PM 
Started by Tuff Chik - Last post by Tuff Chik
Today is JC's bday - normally we would celebrate by going to Pinns, but between House Arrest and the rain, we are home.  Hopefully next year we can celebrate it in style.

 6 
 on: Today at 04:42:24 PM 
Started by F4? - Last post by F4?
Nope some jackass came and picked it up.

I have a nice Miyata that needs some loving.

 7 
 on: Today at 02:29:16 PM 
Started by F4? - Last post by briham89
Do you still have this? Looking for projects right now. Frame size?

 8 
 on: Today at 01:01:37 PM 
Started by joe - Last post by clink
Quote
Is that like an arm pit, centrally close, you can see, but a pain to get to?

 The Granite Quarry was operated by hand labor early on and the workers probably smelled pretty ripe at times.

Quote

A small granite quarry on Judge Logan's ranch east of Watsonville, had been supplying rock for construction of the Southern Pacific Railroad (SP) for several years before it was acquired by Porter's bank in 1899.[2] SP named the quarry spur at railroad milepost 93.2 Logan, after the ranch owner. The quarry on the San Andreas Fault minimized drilling and blasting costs by mining rock broken by fault movement. Smaller particles of construction aggregate were obtained close to the fault, and coarser material was more distant from the fault trace. Porter and Wilson saw its possibilities, found some additional investors, and started up the business with Wilson as Superintendent. In the beginning, quarry operations were tough; fifteen men used sledgehammers, picks, shovels and wheelbarrows to break and load broken rock onto horse-drawn wagons for the trip to the railroad line. Relief came in 1903 when the quarry was automated with Corliss steam engine-powered McCully crusher No.3. It produced 20 tons of 2-inch rock per hour. Crushing capacity was increased by 35 tons per hour in 1904 by crusher No.5 powered by an oil-fired Atlas tandem compound steam engine.[3] Rock was transported from the quarry face to the crushing plant in horse-drawn, side-dump rail cars, which were loaded manually. There were about 24 men working at the quarry.[4]

The 1906 San Francisco earthquake flattened the new steam crushing plant and temporarily halted operations. Rail operations were disrupted, and the quarry operation was devastated. The earthquake's destruction created a demand for construction. In the following years, Granite Rock Company supplied materials for a number of buildings in San Francisco and around the Monterey Bay area. Among those still standing are the old Gilroy City Hall and the old San Francisco Wells Fargo Building. At the quarry in Aromas, California, expansion was taking place.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:40:39 PM 
Started by joe - Last post by clink
Quote
My rule of thumb for now is if you can't walk or bicycle there - you shouldn't go.

 That is anywhere from Marin to SLO for Joe.

 10 
 on: Today at 12:32:10 PM 
Started by joe - Last post by F4?
Quote
4 counties meet near or at Aromas.

Is that like an arm pit, centrally close, you can see, but a pain to get to?

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 ... 10
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!