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Author Topic: Re: Author's official corrections to the new guidebook  (Read 699657 times)
Brad Young
Grand Master
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Posts: 5494


« on: November 16, 2007, 02:47:39 PM »

The site hosts have been kind enough to allow a thread for corrections to the 2007 guidebook. The list below started with four corrections and has grown over time. Others will be edited in to this post which the hosts have made "sticky" so that it stays at the top of the thread (which is itself "sticky"). Also, the date that the most recent correction was added will be posted just above the start of the list.

Corrections (as of December 22, 2019):

1.  Correction, Page 360 (last sentence of the first paragraph):  The words “Drunk in the Rain” should be replaced with the words “Slicker with Liquor.” Confusion over the route name led to a last minute change.  I missed the change at one spot.


2.   Correction, Page 318 (Machete Direct topo):  On the right side of the topo, halfway up the name “Icarus” should be replaced with the name “Daedalus,” as in “150 feet to Daedalus (class three).”  Confusion regarding which name attached to which Glen Denny/Gary Colliver route led to a last minute change.  I missed one spot.  


3.  Correction, Page 293 (photo):  The line depicting route 732, “Stiletto,” extends a little too far.


4.  Clarification, Page 324 (route 811, “The West Face”):  The last sentence of the description is unclear, at least when compared to the Machete Direct topo on page 318.  Machete Direct does join The West Face.  But a clearer description for page 324 results if the last sentence of the route description is replaced with:  “The West Face and Machete Direct join here.”


5. Correction, Page 202 (topo): As stated in the description, Flatiron - Original Route is two (short) pitches. All three of the Flatiron “Apron” routes are one pitch climbs that end at Original Route’s first pitch, two bolt anchor. Appropriate route numbers are not on the topo, but they should be. These numbers should be at the two bolt anchor which is on the upper part of the topo (It is directly above where the word “easy” appears at two places).


6. Correction, Page 362 (route 363.5, “Ola Verde”): Ola Verde does not have a bolt anchor on top. Also it is not an “R” rated route. By way of further description: The cliff this route is on is 100 yards south of the Valle de Baile, on top of Pedras Bonitas Cliff. It faces north. The face has several streaks and is split by one chimney.  Ola Verde is in a shallow grey water steak with black streaks on either side, about in the center of the cliff, to the right of the chimney. The first bolt is obvious. The second bolt is in plain sight 22 feet off the ground, but is so well camouflaged that it is invisible. After 25 feet the climbing becomes easy. After 35 feet it is class three. Continue 80 feet more to the top of the ridge. Sit on the other side of it to belay.


7. Clarification, Page 118 (route 286, “In the Soup”): There are two short, scruffy cliffs that sit above and “behind” Shoot the Tube. One such cliff is behind, but off to the right, maybe 50 feet away. This is not the cliff on which In the Soup is located. In the Soup is located on a short tier of cliffs which is directly back from the top of Shoot the Tube. This tier is about 90 feet away (to the west), and slightly downhill. Two short cracks are on this cliff. The left crack is very thin and dirty and covered with pine needles. In the Soup is the other crack, the one on the right, starting with a short chimney-like section. Good pro and decent rock. Also, it’s probably 5.7, not 5.8.


8. Correction, Page 363 (route 520.2, “Excremental Pinnacle”): This route does not exist. More specifically, this route and route 520.4, Seldom Seen Pinnacle - East Face are one and the same. I confirmed this by going to the area with one of the “Excremental Pinnacle” first ascentionists. This person immediately recognized “their” route, which is the exact same climb “found” by Glen Denny and Gary Coliver when they did the West Face route on Seldom Seen in 1974. Since the formation was named “Seldom Seen” in 1974 and “Excremental Pinnacle” in 1991, the name should remain Seldom Seen. The author’s efforts in trying to find this pinnacle well illustrate how easily confusion arises about such things. Both routes were reported late last season, as the book was nearing completion, and after the raptor closures made the area off limits. Two sets of old notes and three people’s recollection, all communicated to another person (the author) and then interpreted by him resulted in amazing differences (sounds a little like the children’s game “Telephone”).


9. Correction, Page 363 (route 509.6, “Long’s Folly - Leftover”): The current description is correct up into the obvious chimney. However, once into the chimney, do not move up and left on the obvious ramp. Instead, continue (walking) in the chimney to where the ground is at its highest point within the chimney itself. From there stem up between Long’s Folly and Leftover. Halfway up this stemming section a slot/hole on Leftover accepts a good 2 ½ inch cam or stopper. Continue to the top. By way of further information: the route crux is getting past the bolt and it is very reach dependant. Also, at a flat spot near the top, there is a second, hard to see bolt which can be used for a belay. It is just right of a shallow hole, at the base of a slab which leads 15 feet farther to the summit. This bolt is not positioned for rappel, but a slight low point on the formation’s southeast shoulder allows a safe, two rope “Pinnacles rappel.”


10. Correction, Page 363 (route 509.5, “East - Center Pinnacle”): This pinnacle, which is climbed after ascending Leftover, is north - northwest, not west of the summit of Leftover. Traverse over to this “pinnacle,” fourth class, from a shoulder of Leftover (a level area just below its summit) around Leftover’s east side.


11. Clarification, Page 362 (route 448.2, “Lightning Bolt Crack - Original Finish”): After climbing the route and further exploring poor memories about what they did with Jack H, and Keith V, I am now certain that this original finish is one more pitch to the top of this distinct formation only (and not to the top of The Hippopotamus, which is several tiers of rock behind this). Therefore, a better description is: From the bolt anchor at the top of the actual Lightning Bolt Crack move right behind a flake and then along a brushy ledge for about 90 feet. Where the ledge rejoins the ground, climb up and left, around a bit of a corner. Climb along a mossy face next to an up-and-left dihedral with a crack (good medium and large cams here). Twenty feet up is a low angle stance. Tie off a tiny tree. Continue up and left on an obvious, fairly clean, easy slab. One good four inch cam in a hole protects this slab. Finish on the low angle arete which makes up the last 20 feet of the bolted second pitch face of the “regular” Lightning Bolt Crack route. Although the first ascentionists likely wrapped the rope around a small pinnacle to rap off the back side, since both variants now end at the modern two bolt anchor, it is easier to rappel off the front to the top of the first pitch. The first pitch (the Lightning Bolt Crack) is 5.8. The original second pitch is 5.6 R. Although the “regular” Lightning Bolt Crack route is OK, this original finish is very chossy and should probably only be done by the most fanatic fans of obscure Pinnacles routes.


12. Clarification, Page 363 (route 840.2, “Ethical Divide”): Start the chimney climbing near where the ground is highest (the west side of the chimney). Climb 5.5, up and gradually toward the east, using cams from one to four inches in holes. At the top of the chimney a bolt protects moves onto the shoulder of Ethical Pinnacle. Finish on “No Hooks, No Raps....” (The finish is probably only 5.7, making Ethical Divide 5.7, not 5.8.)


13. Correction, Page 137 (route 337, “South Side Shuffle”): This route ends on a high point just north of The Frog’s highest point. The formation high point isn’t accessible by class two (the highest point is the part of the formation that looks like a frog from the north, that is, from on the approach). The farther-north high point where South Side Shuffle ends is a “gathering spot” where walk offs from almost all Frog routes join before moving down this route to the ground. For some forgotten reason, there are two old bolts here.


14.   Correction, Pages 259 and 260 (route 637, “Lonesome Bolt”): This route is rated 5.6 R in the book. The crux is actually 5.8. Also, the crux is high enough above the one bolt that a fall there could result in decking from 25 feet up, onto a terrible landing. None of the knobs will accept slings. So, Lonesome bolt is 5.8 X.


15. Correction, Pages 178 and 179 (route 449, “Tom Turkey”): This route is solid 5.7, not 5.4. Also, it is more of a chimney than it is a stemming problem. The current description resulted from the two different ways the first ascentionists climbed the route. Bring cams from four inches and up.


16.  Correction, Page 266:  At the end of Berserker Route, it is easier to use the top anchor for Costanoan than it is to build a gear anchor.


17. Correction, Page 320 (route 792, “The Arch - Up the Center”): This route does not start “...well to the right.” Although I inspected the route before putting it in the book, I focused on the end of the climbing and the bolt up high. Although I stood at the base of the route several times, I missed a fixed piton in a small corner on the main face below the seam/crack (it is very rusty and not so easy to see). I finally spotted this pin, and, upon closer inspection also found a bolt hole (without anything in it though) about four feet below it. There is also definitely one more “empty” hole above the fixed pin and maybe two more holes. The first ascent party clearly climbed the face below the crack/seam using free moves to a large hook placement to a bolt (later removed?) to a pin to one or two more bolts (now also holes). This leads directly to the start of the seam/crack.


18.  Correction, page 229 (route 570, “Freedom Dome - Regular Route”):  The topo shows rappelling off to the right, 125 feet to the ground.  It is better (and easy) to rappel 95 feet to the ground, slightly left, directly to the base of Regular Route.


19.  Correction, page 291 (route 722, “The Powers That Be”):  Several experienced parties who have climbed this route in the last three years have confirmed that this is worth one, not two stars.


20.  Correction, page 127 (route 312, “Ridge Rock - South Ridge”):  Consensus is that the moves onto the summit are significantly harder than 5.3 (especially considering these moves’ serious exposure); a better rating would be 5.5 (at least).


21. Correction, page 339 (route numbers 838 and 839, "Cleaver Buttress" and "Cleaver Buttress - Direct Variation"): Two changes: First, all four people I know of who have led the first pitch have called it at least 5.9 (or, "closer to 5.10a than to 5.8"). The "normal" second pitch is pretty stiff for 5.8 too. Route 838 should be rated 5.9. Also, the description of the first pitch should add, after the part about the serious run out: (take a few pieces to two inches to use up high). Second, the variation is only a slight variation to part of the second pitch. And the way the description is worded isn't quite correct. The description to route 839 should read: "Continue straight up past the second bolt instead of moving around the arete. Quickly rejoin the regular route (at the height of the third bolt) and finish on that."


22. Clarification, page 284 (route 708, “Crowley Tower - Tower Four”):  The phrase “jumble of rocks” in this route’s description has caused confusion. The phrase was meant to describe a connected series of large (15 foot high) lumps of rock on the ridge that lies between Tower Four and Tower Five. That is, it was designed to make it clear that the chimneying wasn’t between Tower Four and Tower Five, but instead between Tower Four and the west-most of the (jumbled), lower, but still large rocks between these two towers.


23. Correction, page 165 (route 411, "Needles Eye"): This route definitely needs an "R" added to its rating. The initial, chimney section of the route isn't the route crux, but it is terribly loose and getting harder (probably 5.7  near the top - who can tell when most of what is touched falls off). Bad cams 30 feet up then "protect" the moves out to the second bolt. This route also shares the long, long run-out above the two bolt anchor/protection point out on the face.


24. Correction, page 328 (route 816, "Pigeon Crack"): After very extensive investigation and study it appears certain that this route has never been climbed beyond the two bolts that are about 1/3 of the way up the route (see topo, page 329). Currently there is one, new, replacement bolt at this position, 55 feet from the start of the route (two bolts are shown on the topo, one of these two was the replacement bolt and the other was a very, very bad bolt that has since been pulled out). The route ends here. For a very long discussion about this route and about the investigation of it, go to this discussion on the Mudn'Crud forum:   http://www.mudncrud.com/forums/index.php?topic=1960.0


25. Correction, page 90 (routes 239 "Fourth Sister - West Face," and "Fifth Sister - West Face"): John Cook pointed out an error in labeling these routes on the page 90 photo. What is labeled on the photo as "241" (route 241 is Fifth Sister - West Face) is actually route 239 (Fourth Sister - West Face). At the same time, the short, dashed line that is on the actual Fifth Sister is missing its route number - this is the line that should have the number 241. (The topo on page 92 is labeled correctly.)


26.  Change, pages 310 and 311 (Machete descent): On January 2, 2015, three bolted descent/rappel stations were installed in the upper gully.  This addition was made after more than a year of discussion/consensus seeking that involved many (maybe most) climbers who have been active at Pinnacles in the last 10 to 40 years.  For a review of the part of the discussion that occurred online (and for a description of the anchors and their setup) see this Mud‘n Crud thread:  http://www.mudncrud.com/forums


27.  Correction, page 148 (route 381 “Catatonic Stupor”):  The topo shows six bolts but the route has only five.  If what is shown as the fifth bolt on the topo is erased, it gives a close approximation of the bolts’ actual locations.


28.  Correction, pages 149 and 150 (route 383 “Knuckle Ridge Traverse”):  Over the many years that this route has been listed in guidebooks, a few adventurous climbers have tried/done it.  Everyone has come away asking the question:  “How the hell can that traverse be class four?”  Careful studies of this route’s description in successive guidebooks (starting with the one by Steve Roper) show that the route description has changed over time in a way similar to the children’s game “telephone” (in that game, a message is passed on from player to player, only to become unrecognizable by the time it reaches the last player).  For example, my 2007 guidebook describes the route this way:  “…Climb from north to south across all of the summits of Knuckle Ridge.  A two-rope rappel can then be made off the southernmost knuckle (from the same anchor used for the climbs on the south face).”  As described below, this description is wrong (as, incidentally, is the description of a two rope rappel). David Rubine’s guidebook described the route:  “… 4th or 5th class  This line of ridges can be climbed from right/north to left/south by way of the notches between them.  It is necessary to rope for fifth class climbing in a couple of spots when traversing the ridge.  Most of the summits can be climbed fourth class on their west side.”  Paul Gagner’s book (which is a “select” book anyway) skips the whole issue.  It says:  “…4th Class   Climbing routes on this long formation are left up to the individual's imagination; there are a multitude.”  And, continuing back in time, the 1974 Chuck Richards guide describes this route this way:  “…Knuckle Ridge is the most recognizable feature in the valley.  You’ll see it just NW of Lion’s head at the valley’s head.  Five summits on the Ridge are climbed 4th class from right to left, over the notches between them.   Additional chimneys here have yet to be climbed.  Walk off the back.”  This 1974 description may be the root of the error.  Notice how Richards says “...over the notches between them.”  Now compare this with the Steve Roper guidebook (the first to come out after the route was made):  “…Knuckle Ridge is the most prominent feature of the Neglected Valley.  It is located several hundred feet NW of the Lion’s Head, at the head of the valley.  The five summits of the ridge are climbed class 4 from NE to SW via the notches between them.”  Read the wording carefully - there's no mention or hint of a traverse at all.  Now try inserting the words “one after the other” into Roper's description after the words “...are climbed...”  Then, insert the word “various” after the words “...via the....”  Roper’s description isn't a model of clarity, but he seems to mean that a climber is to do one summit at a time, accessing each from the notches between them, and returning to the ground/exiting the formation as needed between ascents.  What else could he mean?  Based on this analysis, a better description of this route reads as follows:

Knuckle Ridge  5.3  R  This mountaineering style route gains all five summits of Knuckle Ridge by the easiest possible means.  In each case, “the easiest possible means” is by first ascending a slot or chimney from the west side of the formation and then climbing to a summit from there.  As described below, a climber will return to the ground (to change chimneys) between some summit ascents.  By way of further reference, the “knuckles” of Knuckle Ridge are numbered one through five from south to north.  This route ascends the fifth through the first knuckles, as follows:
-   The fifth (north-most) summit is easy to reach by way of the small slot/chimney between it and the fourth summit.
-   The fourth summit is reached by 10 feet of 5.3 done just above the same slot.  Return to the ground on the west side of the ridge after these two summits.
-   The middle summit is climbed, class three, by way of the chimney between it and the fourth summit (walk up and then curve right/south on the east side of the ridge).
-   The second and first summits are each reached from the chimneys on their north sides.  Each requires a short bit of easy fifth class.


29.  Correction, page 146 (route 370, “Lion’s Head”):  Lion’s Head is harder than 5.4 and it is not very well protected; 5.7 R is a better rating for this route.


30.  Correction, page 57 (route 81, “Holiday Ordeal”):  A significant number of holds have broken off this route.  It is now at least 5.10d.


31.  Correction, page 137 (route 343, “Tuff”):  The route should be 5.10d R * instead of 5.10c R * (the route is, overall, probably slightly harder than the route Volcanic Panic, which is the next route to the right).


32.  Correction, page 137, (route 344, “Volcanic Panic”):  The route should have an “R” rating (so it should be rated 5.10d R *).


33.  Correction, page 131, (route 324, “Solotero Pina Especial”):  There is a strong consensus that this route is 5.8 not 5.7 (the crux is getting past the first bolt).


34.  Correction, page 146, (route 367, “Little Flatiron - North Chimney”):  This route was named “North Chimney” decades ago.  But it isn’t really a chimney, it’s much better described as a slot.  So, although the name will stay the same, future descriptions will use the word slot, instead of the word chimney.  More critically, this 70 foot route really should have a fifth class rating.  It is 5.3 R.  It is possible to use cams in the slot portion of the climb, although these provide only so-so protection for the slot and no protection at all for the upper slab.


35. Clarification/Correction, page 131, (route 323, "Crud and Mud - East Side"): The 2007 description of this, the original route to the highest summit of Crud and Mud, is incorrect. The route's proper location needs to be clarified as follows:
-     The route called East Side was done decades ago; it is mentioned in multiple prior guidebooks (but was poorly described in them).
-     The 2007 guidebook describes the central chute on the east side of the formation's highest summit as the route "East Side." From east of that summit, this chute looks like the only "easy" way to the top.
-     However, in the course of recent new route activity here the original East Side route was rediscovered and then rebolted (of the route's two bolts, the first had no hanger and wasn't visible from any distance, and the second was around to the right and out of sight).
-     A proper description of the route East Side should read: East Side 5.2 R  The approach to this route is the same as for the route Just Chute Me. Walk around the south/uphill end of Crud and Mud to a brush free, flat area at the base of the south summit’s east side (well below three short, shallow chutes). Traverse up and right over a rib of rock, past shrubs to a small grassy area at the base of a steep but easy water chute that is 10 feet left of a big left-facing corner. Climb this chute 20 feet to a slabby area below a headwall. Move right below the headwall 15 feet to a bolt at the base of a shoulder of rock (the bolt can be used to make a midway belay to avoid rope drag). Move around to the right (northwest) 15 feet to another bolt before continuing past large knobs rightward into a water chute. Climb the chute 25 feet to a large flat area which is below the true summit of Crud and Mud (knobs can be slung in the chute). A two bolt anchor allows a belay here, after which an easy scramble can be made to the true summit. A 50 foot rappel from the bolts leads to the base of the climb.
-     The water chute that was mistaken for the route East Side in the 2007 book (described there as a "shallow groove") was climbed and bolted after the correct East Side route was rediscovered and rebolted. This route is Just Chute Me (route number 325.63 on the new routes list).


36. Correction (sort of), page 112, (route 268, “Shoot the Tube”): Jim McConachie, one of the first ascent party, rebolted this route about four years ago. While rebolting the route Jim decided that the run-out at the top wasn’t desirable anymore and he added a new (fifth) bolt to his own climb. As a result of this addition, the route topo is no longer accurate.


37. Correction, Page 143 (route 354 "Looking For the Past"): This climb starts out of a small creek bed which is directly below the two boulders that make up a chimney. The bed of the creek seems to have eroded quite a bit since this climb was first made in 2000; the rock is way too undercut now to start by chimney moves (which is what the 2007 guidebook calls for). Instead a climber must do steep 5.6 moves on the east rock to get started.


38. Correction, Page 111 (route 262 "South Yak - South Face"):  This route is described as a two pitch climb in the guidebook. Recent rebolting efforts have revealed a third pitch. The original description is correct regarding the first two pitches (all of the lead bolts on the first pitch and four out of eight on the second pitch have been replaced however, and a two bolt anchor has been installed at the tops of each pitch). The discovered third pitch climbs directly right from the anchor on top of pitch two. This pitch consists of ten bolts (four recently replaced) to two newly fixed pitons and then a new two bolt anchor (the old two bolt anchor was left in place just right of the new anchor because that old anchor is quite unique). The rappel from the end of the third pitch is possibly unique in the park: an 85 foot single rope rappel to the ground from the end of a three pitch route! This rappel is also massively overhanging.


39.  Clarification/Correction, page 121, (route 301, “North Goal Post”):  The first bolt on this formation’s route is impossible to see from any vantage point that isn’t on the climbing route itself.  The route is also quite contrived in that it is very easy to approach to within five feet of the route’s second bolt, class three, from a large shoulder of rock to the southeast.  So really, there are two ways to reach the second bolt, one that is nearly a walk until the last five feet, and one from the ground directly below.  As a result, the new guidebook will list two routes on North Goal Post as follows:

378.  North Goal Post - Shortcut  5.6  Move onto a long, low shoulder of rock that extends southeast from North Goal Post to near South Goal Post.  Walk 40 feet to a point below the formation’s short northeast face.  Step around onto the north face and the second lead bolt of North Goal Post - Original.  Finish on that route to the top and the two-bolt anchor.  (Note that Original’s second bolt is easy to see from the ground, but its first bolt is not.)    

379.  North Goal Post - Original  5.6  Start this route amid trees on North Goal Post’s northeast face.  Look for a knobby, slight, shallow groove downhill/right from a point directly below the summit.  The groove leads 25 feet to a shoulder on the formation’s northwest side.  A bolt 30 feet from the start protects easy moves up and left to a second bolt, which protects moves over the crux bulge.  There is a two-bolt anchor on top.


40.  Correction, Page 283 (route 702 "Point Five Pinnacle - Regular"): The route should actually be called "Regular Route" to be consistent with other climbs in the book.

More important though are the results of a series of conversations I had about it with John Cook. First, about the route's first ascent. In the 2007 book I credited the first ascent this way: "unknown, possibly Brad Young, 12/2005." Although I was trying to be conservative then in what I claimed by way of first ascents, I probably should have just claimed this one. There's never been any report of a route on this end of Point Five Pinnacle, I've never heard of anyone climbing it, ever (except now John Cook, see below), and in soloing up and down the route twice while working on the 2007 book I saw no sign that anyone else had ever climbed that way (no obvious signs, but also no "maybe pin-scars" or any other subtle indications). No one has made any claim to it since the 2007 book either. If the FA is truly "unknown," the same reasoning ("someone might have done it before") applies to many, many other routes in the park (although obviously, the harder the route, the less likely that it was climbed before the attributed first ascent without leaving any signs of passage - like bolts).

So it's almost certainly true that I did the first ascent of this route, and I intend to modify the FA info in the upcoming second edition.

Continuing though, while discussing this issue with me, John also pointed out that the route might be "only" 5.4, and I may have soloed up and down it, but it's fairly long and exposed, and it certainly deserved an "X" sub-rating. There's a crux up high and a fall from that would likely kill someone. I hadn't given it an "X" before since it's "easy," and since I hadn't really been thinking about protection when I climbed up and down it. I asked John if he thought a bolt (one) might be warranted. He thought so. I asked if he'd be willing to place such a bolt. He was willing and did so last week. So the route now has one bolt, which was added at the request of the first ascentionist. It should be considered 5.4 R now (and will be in the new book).


41.  This correction is regarding The Birds as a group, Page 172 (routes 432 through 437): The 2007 guidebook perpetuates an error regarding The Buzzard and omits a (tiny) route on The Ravens as follows.

First, the route The Raven - North Side is referenced in Steve Roper’s 1966 guidebook, and several of us researched it during this last Master’s of Mud weekend. I’ve added it to the New Routes list (it isn’t new, but newly added, which is similar to newly found). It’s also in the text for the upcoming second edition guidebook.

Second, extensive research into past guidebooks (by me and J.C.) and field research at The Birds (by John and me and a bunch of climbers there this last weekend) makes it clear that what is labeled as The Buzzard - North Face in each book from 1974 to 2007 is not right. All of these books have omitted Roper’s brief 1966 reference to a “shelf” on The Buzzard’s north side, a feature that identifies the route The Buzzard - North Face. All of these books (mine included) have identified a route that is really on The Buzzard’s upper east face as the North Face route.

Here are the correct names and descriptions of four routes on The Buzzard (copy/pasted from the upcoming/new guidebook text):

675.  The Buzzard - Westside Lieback  5.9 (TR)  The uphill/west face of The Buzzard is 25 feet high.  Its major feature is a thick, left-facing dihedral/flake.  Toprope this from the two-bolt summit anchor.  

676.  The Buzzard - North Face  5.6 R Start on The Buzzard’s uphill (west) side.  A class four ramp on the left leads to a point partway up the pinnacle’s north face.  Crux moves lead to easy ground, the summit, and a two-bolt anchor.  The only protection on this climb consists of small to two inch gear in a poor-quality crack at the far end of the ramp.

677.  The Buzzard - Backside Route  5.5 R  A large block of rock separates The Buzzard from The Vulture.  Scramble east through a notch between this block and The Buzzard’s north face.  From a wide platform above The Buzzard’s east face, move south, onto a ramp system with a poor-quality, diagonal crack (two and three inch gear).  Move over a bulge and then up The Buzzard’s upper east face to its summit.  

678.  The Buzzard - East Face  5.5 R  This 90-foot route ascends an obvious groove in the middle-left of The Buzzard’s east (downhill) face.  Move up through a brushy chimney to get to the start.  Continue up and right from the top of the groove to join The Buzzard - Backside Route. Although the groove is shallow, it will accept cams (tiny to five inches).

A few additional notes:

-  Roper didn’t actually name any route on The Buzzard except the North Face;

-  What appears above as The Buzzard - Backside Route is the same climb that is called The Buzzard - North Face in the 1974 through 2007 guidebooks. If he’d named it, Roper might have called it the East Face, but another route now bears that name (see below). So I used the name Backside Route (which also fits the actual climb). BTW, Roper called this route “class 4.” The 5.5 rating above is a unanimous opinion from five different people who’ve climbed it within the last month (mostly this last weekend);

-  The Buzzard - East Face is a route that Clint and I discovered/found back when we were researching the 2007 guidebook. In retrospect, we may well have done an FA up the entire face (the “real” east face route first described by Roper is now called Backside Route, and only climbs the upper part of that face, reaching it from under the north face). I won’t claim this as an FA though on the remote chance that it wasn’t. We’ll leave this longer route as FA “unknown.”

-  Has anyone actually read this entire incredibly verbose correction to this point? If so, you might be obsessed with Pinnacles. Go climb O.C.D. Overdrive and think about it. Then post your thoughts here.


42. Correction, Page 182 (route 459, Casino Rock Backside Summit): This summit is fairly large (150 feet from southwest to northeast), has significant relief (it’s 50 feet higher than the plateau to its southeast, and much taller than the ground to the northwest), and has more than one “obvious” climbing line. The 2007 guidebook lists one generalized class four route to the highest point, but there are four totally plain and separate ways to the top, along with two different bolted top anchors (the one at the highest point was rebolted by J.C. a couple years ago and now consists of two great bolts; the bolt anchor on the separate northeast pillar is still an single old bolt).

The area is viewful, the rock clean and mostly hard, and the climbing there is, I think, better for beginners than, as an example, the toprope routes at Teaching Rock (I’d certainly rather take beginners to Casino). The new book will therefore list four separate routes here as follows:

707.  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Left Chute  5.0 (Not shown on topo.)  Casino Rock’s true summit consists of a narrow ridge which extends northeast (toward Condor Gulch Trail) from the top of the southwest face.  From the southeast, the main part of the ridge looks like an interconnected series of summits.  Separated from this by a four-foot wide corridor is a smaller part of the ridge, an independent northeast pillar.  There are three routes on the southeast side of the main ridge.  All three climb shallow to very shallow water chutes.  Only the middle chute reaches the ground.  To climb Left Chute, start in the middle chute before moving left.  Finish on top of the ridge, 50 feet above the ground.  A horizontal crack partway up takes one to 1½ inch gear, but there is no protection above.  Belay using body position or, with extra rope, from the two-bolt Crap Chute top-anchor 30 feet to the west.  The formation’s high point and a two-bolt anchor are 30 feet to the right (northeast).  

708.  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Middle Chute  5.1 R (Not shown on topo.)  Climb the middle chute to the top.  Poor quality one-half to one inch gear can be attempted partway up.  Move right to the two-bolt summit anchor to belay.

709.  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Right Chute  5.2 R (Not shown on topo.)  Start up the middle chute but veer right into a faint and very shallow chute that leads directly to the summit anchor.  One and three inch gear can be used in a horizontal crack a third of the way up.  

710.  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Northeast Pillar  5.6 R (Not shown on topo.)  This short route leads to the top of the summit ridge’s separate northeast pillar.  Climb the right side of the pillar’s southeast face (start just left of a nine-foot high block wedged in a notch).  There is a two-bolt summit anchor on top, 25 feet from the start.

Of these four routes, the first one (to be labeled number 707 in the new book) is the same as route number 459 in the 2007 book. I'll cross-post the other three to the new routes list (with different route numbers for now, consistent with that document).


43. Change, Page 202 (route 501, Burtons Below): I established this route with Steve Wong over 25 years ago. I recently partially rebolted it while at The Flatiron checking route descriptions and the topo. While rebolting, I decided to change a bolt location and add one bolt (totally within accepted climbing ethics, since I put it up).

Two friends of mine have each fallen from the first crux of this route (which is now solid 5.9) onto the first bolt. Both came really close to the ground. Too close. Luckily, neither was hurt.

So, while rebolting, I moved the second bolt down three feet. Now a climber has protection that is adequate to prevent ground fall. Moving this bolt left a big gap above, so I added a new third bolt about three feet above the old second bolt’s location.

This route is now 5.9 * and adequately protected.


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Brad Young
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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2012, 04:32:21 PM »

I added correction number 21 regarding the Cleaver Buttress routes.

Thanks again Gavin for your patience while I worked it out.
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2012, 05:19:57 PM »

No problem, Brad - I definitely enjoyed the route, even with the cold winds funneling in at us!

I added correction number 21 regarding the Cleaver Buttress routes.

Thanks again Gavin for your patience while I worked it out.
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waldo
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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2012, 05:48:04 PM »

Good work Gavin and Brad!  Jack never meant to sandbag on purpose.  He just didn't realize how well he was climbing.
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k-man
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« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2012, 08:00:32 AM »

Brad, may I suggest you add a date (or version number) to the correction list so we know when it's last been updated. Because it sticks to the top of the forum, it'd be nice to know when we need to recheck the list.
Cheers,
   :- k
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Brad Young
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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 08:19:45 AM »

How's that? (i.e. I added a date, is it done clearly enough?)
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mungeclimber
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2012, 09:45:46 AM »

There should be a way to show "last edited" date in the OP in SMF. I've got it on SPH.

Until the thread was cropped from the clutter, the last post by Brad with its time stamp was a good way, but if we keep cropping, that won't work long term.
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« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2012, 09:52:59 AM »

Quote
Jack never meant to sandbag on purpose.  He just didn't realize how well he was climbing.

That's a great quote!
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 08:11:35 PM »

So where is the correction to say that Beyond Destiny is a bunch o' crap!?
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2012, 09:01:27 PM »

So where is the correction to say that Beyond Destiny is a bunch o' crap!?

No correction necessary since the book doesn't call it anything but another no star route?
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mungeclimber
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2012, 09:17:22 PM »

So where is the correction to say that Beyond Destiny is a bunch o' crap!?

which one is that?
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cobbledik
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« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2012, 10:58:23 AM »

Is it bad that now I want to climb "Beyond Destiny?"
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mungeclimber
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« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2012, 11:01:38 AM »

Is it bad that now I want to climb "Beyond Destiny?"

lol
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« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2012, 11:07:19 AM »

Beyond Destiny is tame compared to Triple X, which breaks right at that roof.

I caught a 40+ foot fall from the top of XXX, a bomber star dryvin saved the day.

 4 trips trying to rebolt that sucker, now I am down to 2 bolts (which I never knew were there).

Had to be rescued the last time i was on it, lost in a sea of choss.

It may be the 3rd worst route I have ever been on, with #1 being the 5.10 on Elephant rock with A determined 5.10 author.  Of note, a repeat ascent of the 5.10 route may not be possible at the grade given.  I took a huge pillar off at the start.

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« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2012, 12:38:03 PM »

Holloeenie IS the loosest route. Although there maybe a DES one that if you sneeze on the rocks you loose holds.
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« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2012, 12:46:09 PM »

Josh is talking about route number 642 Never Forget, on Elephant Rock. Yes, that's among the five worst in the Monument. Until you posted Josh, I didn't know you'd pulled that pillar off when you followed the first pitch. I agree, it's likely harder now.

But there are worse routes. The top-rope route ATDS on the Sew What Needles is probably looser (although it's a top-rope, which makes it less scary than was Never Forget). ATDS' name comes from a "sub-rating" I'd "invented" for Pinnacles routes. It stands for Absolute Total Dog... well you get the idea. We decided not to actually use it as a sub-rating in the book. On the same formation, Sew What Needles, Needful is one of the worst routes I've ever done (thanks again Munge for your patience while I led that one).

But of the 840-something routes I've done at Pinns, the worst, hands down, is Hershel Bershel, on Resurrection Wall. The description in the book is only a start on how bad it is. I'm pretty sure that both Munge and Mud thought I was going to die (and Munge probably thought he was going to die too) the first time I was on that. I've led and followed all three pitches on it. No person could pay me enough to go back.

So, Cruxluv, you made it pretty clear that Beyond Destiny isn't  among your favorite Pinnacles routes. Would you be willing to share with us the back-story?
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« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2012, 01:11:13 PM »

what about that route over on the right side of the balconies.  It is over there by Knifeblade and goes up the corner.  that upper part is some realy incredible loose choss.  Quite beautiful.
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mungeclimber
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« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2012, 01:49:47 PM »

what about that route over on the right side of the balconies.  It is over there by Knifeblade and goes up the corner.  that upper part is some realy incredible loose choss.  Quite beautiful.

I followed you on that one day, and we finished on KnifeBlade. Agree, sweet crappy choss there. Solid lead and I recall you didn't get PO either. Bonus points.
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« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2012, 01:53:13 PM »

Josh is talking about route number 642 Never Forget, on Elephant Rock. Yes, that's among the five worst in the Monument. Until you posted Josh, I didn't know you'd pulled that pillar off when you followed the first pitch. I agree, it's likely harder now.

But there are worse routes. The top-rope route ATDS on the Sew What Needles is probably looser (although it's a top-rope, which makes it less scary than was Never Forget). ATDS' name comes from a "sub-rating" I'd "invented" for Pinnacles routes. It stands for Absolute Total Dog... well you get the idea. We decided not to actually use it as a sub-rating in the book. On the same formation, Sew What Needles, Needful is one of the worst routes I've ever done (thanks again Munge for your patience while I led that one).

But of the 840-something routes I've done at Pinns, the worst, hands down, is Hershel Bershel, on Resurrection Wall. The description in the book is only a start on how bad it is. I'm pretty sure that both Munge and Mud thought I was going to die (and Munge probably thought he was going to die too) the first time I was on that. I've led and followed all three pitches on it. No person could pay me enough to go back.

So, Cruxluv, you made it pretty clear that Beyond Destiny isn't  among your favorite Pinnacles routes. Would you be willing to share with us the back-story?

David S. was with us that day you lead that upper pitch and Mud dropped a line. I had bailed off at the meadow not wanting to continue the route after leading the first pitch and following the second. animal feces, moss covered mud and cobbles loosely held together, run out, crappy belay with questionable cam placements. I think Uber followed you on the upper pitch??? Not sure. Anyways, I did think you were going to die. You went totally silent for a way too long period.

I agree HBerchel is the absolute worst climb.
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« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2012, 02:01:27 PM »

Quote
I agree HBerchel is the absolute worst climb.

I'll take your word and not go find out for myself...
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