May 27, 2017, 05:46:25 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: For current weather conditions at Pinnacles, click here.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 [9] 10
  Print  
Author Topic: Katie's Doing Well at U.C.S.B.  (Read 43562 times)
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #160 on: April 14, 2017, 09:46:38 AM »

Reminds me of the jumping shoes that came out when we were kids in the '60s.


When I had a bit more spring in my legs  Laugh Out Loud

Logged
clink
Pin Heads
*
Posts: 2145


« Reply #161 on: April 14, 2017, 10:54:52 AM »

Air!
Logged

Causing trouble when not climbing.
mungeclimber
Mr. BLL
***
Posts: 5838


WWW
« Reply #162 on: April 14, 2017, 07:23:23 PM »

GET SOME!!!
Logged

On Aid at Pinns... It's all A1 til it crumbles. - Munge
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #163 on: April 17, 2017, 11:09:05 AM »

Another fun three-day loop trip with Katie and one of her Excursion friends (Emma). We had great weather and no rattlesnakes (about time on that second one).

At the trailhead:




We quickly saw our good luck horned toad (a huge one!):




This trip we hiked up one of the very few (only?) trails that I hadn't hiked in the San Rafael Wilderness; going up Lost Canyon Trail led us to the east end of Hurricane Deck and a great first night's bivy spot (up high on a ridge, so we had to carry lots of water the last four miles):













Katie labeled that last shot "Sponsored by Salsas Awesome Hats" (those are both Vicki-made hats of course).

We got very early morning light at our perch:




The morning's first four miles led east to the end of the Hurricane Deck Trail (the first mile hadn't been brushed in years, the rest of this hike was on a good, fairly clear path):



















White Ledge Creek was as full as I've ever seen it:




We worked our way up the creek to eventually bivy above Alcove Falls (where Katie and I had stayed last year too):







A dog's comfort is one thing. But really? That's my crazy creek chair!




The next day we hiked out the nine miles to the car and then back to Isla Vista for lunch and to drop off the girls:














Logged
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #164 on: April 17, 2017, 11:49:24 AM »

Looks like you guys had a fun and peaceful outing.
The change from horizontal to tilted strata in the fourth picture may be a fault (unless there is some type of optical illusion). The tilt is really obvious in the 7th picture at your perch. Not sure if that is a local or regional feature since the Coast Ranges have so much variety. Most of the rocks appear to be a fairly clean-looking sandstone (quartz rich). Most likely old seafloor pushed up along faults over millions of years. Sleep Sleep Sleep I'm in geological mode sitting here proctoring an exam.
Logged
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #165 on: April 17, 2017, 01:03:37 PM »

I'm curious what you mean by "local or regional" features.

The Hurricane Deck is about 20 miles long, oriented east-west (see it in photos five and last). The really obvious strata in the fourth photo are part of the Hurricane Deck (in particular, that fourth photo shows an area which is called on maps "East Deck").

In turn, the Hurricane Deck is part of a sub-range which is part of the east-west oriented Santa Ynez Mountains.

Is this all regional or local?

(And by the way, are you proud that - based on your training of me/complaining to me - I did not say that the deck "runs" east-west.)
Logged
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #166 on: April 17, 2017, 01:08:58 PM »

Here are two more photos of the Hurricane Deck. These are taken from the southeast (on a 2013 trip with Tricia).

The heavy, obvious strata from this trip report's fourth photo are at/just off the right edge of the first photo, and can be seen in the second photo:





Logged
clink
Pin Heads
*
Posts: 2145


« Reply #167 on: April 17, 2017, 01:21:15 PM »

Did you boulder on the outcrops?
Logged

Causing trouble when not climbing.
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #168 on: April 17, 2017, 01:31:20 PM »


Did you boulder on the outcrops?


No. It's really soft sandstone. And quite flakey in many places.
Logged
mungeclimber
Mr. BLL
***
Posts: 5838


WWW
« Reply #169 on: April 17, 2017, 01:47:35 PM »

why can't people say 'runs'?  Everybody gets it.... so to speak.
Logged

On Aid at Pinns... It's all A1 til it crumbles. - Munge
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #170 on: April 17, 2017, 02:23:27 PM »

why can't people say 'runs'?  Everybody gets it.... so to speak.

If you do get them try eating cheese  Laugh Out Loud
Logged
mynameismud
unworthy

Posts: 4800


WWW
« Reply #171 on: April 17, 2017, 02:26:58 PM »

i did not get that
Logged

Here's to sweat in your eye
mynameismud
unworthy

Posts: 4800


WWW
« Reply #172 on: April 17, 2017, 02:27:24 PM »

@Brad, looks like a good outing.
Logged

Here's to sweat in your eye
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #173 on: April 17, 2017, 02:35:38 PM »

I'm curious what you mean by "local or regional" features.

The Hurricane Deck is about 20 miles long, oriented east-west (see it in photos five and last). The really obvious strata in the fourth photo are part of the Hurricane Deck (in particular, that fourth photo shows an area which is called on maps "East Deck").

In turn, the Hurricane Deck is part of a sub-range which is part of the east-west oriented Santa Ynez Mountains.

Is this all regional or local?

(And by the way, are you proud that - based on your training of me/complaining to me - I did not say that the deck "runs" east-west.)


It's all relative and scale related. Local is usually associated with smaller scale and regional with larger scale.
It sounds like in this case we could say that the Hurricane Deck and the sub range are local features within the Santa Ynez Mtns (regional). The Santa Ynez Mtns would be local relative to the Coast Ranges (regional).

If all the layers of rock were tilted that same direction and angle in all of the sub ranges within the Coast Ranges then that would be a regional attitude. If not it would be considered local. I bet the UC Santa Barbara geology field classes hike out to measure the strike and dip (attitude) of those strata and plot it on maps.  

And yes...I am proud.  Thumb Up Dude Big Grin Laugh Out Loud
 
Logged
mungeclimber
Mr. BLL
***
Posts: 5838


WWW
« Reply #174 on: April 17, 2017, 03:24:27 PM »

I'll give you a
Quote
regional attitude
!


 Grin
Logged

On Aid at Pinns... It's all A1 til it crumbles. - Munge
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #175 on: April 17, 2017, 03:47:13 PM »

I'll give you a regional attitude!  Grin

 Laugh Out Loud Laugh Out Loud Laugh Out Loud

P.S. eating small bits of bentonite will work if you don't have cheese  Thumb Up Dude Big Grin
Logged
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #176 on: April 18, 2017, 12:15:10 PM »

No. It's really soft sandstone. And quite flakey in many places.

Young, poorly lithified sediments (10's of millions of years old) intensely folded and faulted. Thumb Up Dude Big Grin Yes Nod

Logged
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #177 on: April 18, 2017, 12:45:14 PM »

I'm curious if you can post that map in a slightly larger version?

As near as I can tell, the purple band represents the highest reaches of the San Rafael Wilderness (Mount McKinley, San Rafael Peak and the Mission Pine area). Is that a different type of rock (the colors show different types of rock, right)?
Logged
JC w KC redux
AgentOrange
*
Posts: 3313


my density has brought me to you...


« Reply #178 on: April 18, 2017, 01:11:00 PM »

I'm curious if you can post that map in a slightly larger version?

As near as I can tell, the purple band represents the highest reaches of the San Rafael Wilderness (Mount McKinley, San Rafael Peak and the Mission Pine area). Is that a different type of rock (the colors show different types of rock, right)?

I just did a quick search and that one came up in images, so the resolution is really low.
That slice is pretty small scale. You'd have to try and figure out which quadrangle you were in and then search that.
The beauty is the USGS has a lot of maps out there as open file pdf's that are really high resolution.
Here is one I found for the coastal plain in that area. You can zoom in to your heart's content.
https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3001/downloads/pdf/SIM3001map.pdf

It looks like many of the maps for that area may only be available in hard copy. They were made by Dibblee. He was a mapping maniac BITD. A legend of geologic mapping  Yes Nod
This website recommends doing more searches since the site is in archives.
https://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/archive/socal/maps/santa_barbara/index.html

That image I posted did not include the legend, so I don't know what rock type that is but you are correct - each color corresponds to a different rock type. The geology around there looks really interesting. It is no wonder Tanya Atwater spent her career at UCSB. I met her on the west side of Pinnacles a couple years ago. She is retired now but was a major player in the development of Plate Tectonics theory.
Logged
Brad Young
Grand Master
**
Posts: 4327


« Reply #179 on: April 18, 2017, 01:24:05 PM »

The easiest way for me to determine what is where on that map is by Lake Cachuma (one drives right by it on the way to the usual trailheads). My recollection is that there's a fair amount of granite in the higher reaches of the area (at least I'm fairly sure it's granite - I haven't studied it but it looked and felt that way). I was wondering whether the purple on the map was granitic rock (maybe older rock - country rock if I'm using that phrase correctly - that was uplifted along with everything else nearby).

And, although I've never mentioned this to you, I did take general education level geology while at U.C.S.B. I especially enjoyed the field study portions of the class. I have no memory of who my professor was though (but if she's retired now, it may well have been professor Atwater).
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 [9] 10
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!