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Author Topic: Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the '07 Guidebook)  (Read 2741552 times)
Brad Young
Grand Master
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Posts: 5487


« on: November 18, 2008, 11:32:23 AM »

I have what I consider a "complete" list of new and newly found routes since the book came out. But I think it's only fair to keep parts of the list non-public. For example, at one point Munge and Uber posted on this site about a route they established (after the book came out). I knew/know where the route is because I was there with Uber when he "discovered" the potential line. But, their post doesn't say where the climb is, AND I'm pretty sure they intend more lines there. So I'm not sure it's fair to them to post what's on my list yet. And Mr Mud's route is noted on this site too, but not with a lot of detail. I note all this because I would like to keep a "current" list, and I'd appreciate hearing from people about new routes. But, I will keep such information private if so requested, for as long as requested. I'll start with what I have that is for sure public. I've also got a format that may help with a new book in the future, designed to list all known information so the route can be "tracked down" at some point, if needed. Other "posters" of new routes might find this format helpful too.

There are 377 new and found routes listed as of March 16, 2020 (when added to the 893 routes listed in the 2007 guidebook, this makes 1,271 routes publicly known to exist at Pinnacles):

EAST SIDE:

0.23  Rock Bottom  5.6  This is one of three routes located on Peaks View Pinnacle.  This formation is located on the East Side along Chalone Creek, well below the Bear Gulch parking areas.  To get to Peaks View Pinnacle, park at Peaks View, which is on the left side of Highway 146, 1.4 miles past the campground entrance, just before the prominent, long, flat, straight stretch of highway.  From parking look south, across Chalone Creek.  Peaks View Pinnacle sits low on the hillside, 250 yards from parking.  The approach is brush-free until very near the pinnacle.  For Rock Bottom, climb the downhill (north) side of the pinnacle.  Seven bolts in 90 feet lead to a two-bolt summit anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  December 9, 2017.  Source(s):  Discussion with John Cook hours after route was established; ascent of route with Jon Cochran, December 10, 2017.

0.25  Tenuous  5.7  Look for a large pillar/flake on the west side of Peaks View Pinnacle (it is most definitely not attached to the main formation).  Approach its right/uphill side.  Start with a ten-foot section of class four to a stance.  Clip the first bolt, near the right, top of the pillar.  Wild moves lead to the top of the pillar, and a second bolt.  Easy moves lead to the summit slab and then the top, 35 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jon Cochran, John Cook.  FA Date:  December 10, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

0.26  Stick It  5.5  Climb the slot on the uphill (south) side of the pinnacle which leads to a shoulder.  A few more moves lead to the summit, 25 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Brad Young, Kathy Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  December 2, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

0.5  Flake Don’t Break  5.9+ R  This route is located on a rock called Snake Bend Wall (this route’s first ascent authors gave the formation a humorous name of their own:  “The Screeching Halt,” but it was dubbed Snake Bend Wall some years ago).  No routes have previously been reported on this formation, although other climbers have done some light exploring on it.  Snake Bend Wall is visible from the road that leads up to the normal East Side parking area.  It is on the left, 0.7 mile after the stone-lined bridge across Chalone Creek (where the road forks on the drive into the East Side).  Park for Snake Bend Wall in one of the normal East Side parking areas.  Approach by hiking down the Bear Gulch Trail (downstream, away from the “normal” Bear Gulch climbing areas).  This trail crosses two foot-bridges before crossing over a paved, employee housing driveway.  Continue another 125 yards from the driveway before reaching a third bridge.  This bridge is quickly followed by a fourth bridge.  The trail then immediately curves right.  Snake Bend Wall is across the creek from this bend, facing northeast, right at the trail.  Flake Don’t Break ascends a crack system just to the right of a prominent roof. The crack curves left at the top to a belay at an oak tree on a ledge (the first ascent party descended by rappelling from this tree). EDIT: As indicated (now) below, both Gavin and I have done subsequent leads of this route. I can add the following information: First, this is a very, very serious and committing lead; the route might be "X" and not "R" depending on whether two cams - or the rock they are in - would or would not hold a fall (neither of us "tested" these pieces). Second, anyone who does this route will instantly recognize that its name is very, very well given. Third, I found a very old, very worn piece of one-inch tubular webbing (with a water knot in it) buried in the dirt at the top of the crack. Someone has been active on this rock in the past, although I suspect the webbing came from the top of the formation (I've speculated that it fell off a practice rappel anchor there after it rotted through??); it seems fairly clear, however, that this route hadn't been climbed before Kinkaid's very bold, onsight lead. FA Party: Maxwell Kincaid, Chris Koppl.  FA Date:  November 11, 2012.  Source(s):  Mountain Project November 15, 2012, posting about the route and its first ascent; discussion with Maxwell Kinkaid for further details; subsequent leads of route by Gavin Emmons and Brad Young.

0.8  East Ridge Rock  5.5 A1  East Ridge Rock is a jumbled formation located 300 yards due east of Discovery Wall and 200 yards due north of Marmot Wall.  It is easy to see East Ridge Rock from the main Bear Gulch parking area.  It can also be seen well from the west rim of Bear Gulch, on a slope amid lots of brush, well across the canyon.  The rocks have one distinct summit which has a serious overhang/roof on its north side.  Although it may look easiest to approach from just below Marmot Wall, that approach is a massive brush-crash.  Instead, access East Ridge Rock, mostly brush-free, from a point between the upper and middle Bear Gulch parking areas.  Move uphill and right (due south) from there in an open mix of oaks, brush and grass.  Find and pass uphill (east) of a huge water tank.  Cross the small drainage just southwest of the tank.  Continue uphill, first moving south and then southeast/uphill, still in fairly clear terrain, now with a second drainage to the right (southwest).  About 250 yards from parking, at a point directly across this drainage (east) from a distinct, 25-foot high spire with two tiny summits, move across the drainage and then uphill through 100 feet of brush to the spire and a large, grassy area.  East Ridge Rock is 250 feet to the west of this grassy area, through moderate brush (gaps can be found).  Reach the east-base of the formation, directly below the huge roof, before moving left/uphill to the 35-foot high southeast corner of the tallest rock.  One aid bolt is followed by a second bolt which protects easy free climbing up and right to a shoulder.  A third bolt on a short but undercut bulge allows one more aid move onto the spacious summit and a two-bolt anchor. FA Party: Brad Young.  FA Date: January 23, 2018. Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

5.1  B.A.P. Trap  5.5  This route has been climbed for many years, but never previously identified as a separate climb.  It clearly is one, however.  Start in a left-facing corner barely right of Wee Little One (the two routes slowly diverge).  The corner turns into a slot 25 feet up.  Finish at the Wee Little One anchor.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of route with Brian Hamilton and Whitney Reynier, November 12, 2017.

12.5  The Long and the Short of It  5.9 *  This climb begins on the Tourist Trap’s midway ledge, 25 feet right of the two bolts found halfway up Nipple Jam.  Start in an up-and-left hand and finger crack.  This leads 15 feet to a roof (gear to 1 ½ inches).  Make one move over the roof to the first bolt (reachy).  Three more bolts protect climbing up and generally right to a shallow corner. One more bolt protects moves up the corner to a two-bolt anchor, 55 feet from the start of the route. FA Party: Gavin Emmons, Kyle Queener, Brad Young.  FA Date: October 27, 2014. Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

12.72  Out of Mind  5.6 *  This route (and the two that follow) are on The Invisible Cliffs.  The Invisible Cliffs are the extensive band to the right of Tourist Trap (they are actually in plain sight).  Look for the largest face within this band (it is readily visible from the highest East Side parking).  Approach from the right side of Tourist Trap.  Move right 250 feet to a prominent oak which sits in front of the 75 foot-high face.  Out of Mind is the leftmost of two parallel climbs on this face.  Start at the cliff’s bottom right side.  Class four leads up and left 15 feet, onto a sloping ledge to a first bolt 25 feet up (12 feet left from the first bolt on the route Out of Sight, listed next).  Four more bolts protect climbing up and a little left (with a significant leftward traverse after bolt four).  From the fifth bolt, 20 feet of easy ground (optional medium gear) leads to a two-bolt anchor 65 feet from the start.  Descend by rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Jennifer Wang.  FA Date:  November 13, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

12.73  Out of Sight  5.6 *  This route parallels Out of Mind to its right.  Start at the right side of a sloping ledge 10 feet above the right bottom of the cliff.  Move five feet left to the route’s first bolt.  Three more bolts protect climbing to and over the left side of a bulge, onto a ledge and then up an easy face.  A two-bolt anchor 45 feet from the start allows a rappel (which is 55 feet, it goes past the start ledge to the ground).  FA Party:  Brad Young, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  April 28, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

12.75  Camouflage Corner  5.5  Climb the right-facing, curving corner which starts five feet right of Out of Sight.  The route is dirty, but protection is good.  Where the corner curves left and becomes a ramp, traverse to Out of Sight’s fourth bolt.  Finish at that route’s anchor.  FA Party:  Brian Hamilton, Whitney Reynier, Brad Young, Jennifer Wang.  FA Date:  November 12, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

13.2  Battle Hamster  5.9 *  Battle Hamster is one of several routes established on the broken-up cliff between Wild Berry Crack and Pickpocket (which is the left-most route on Tourist Trap).  Battle Hamster is located 40 feet right of Wild Berry Crack.  Stemming in a deep, black chimney leads to a ledge on the right.  From the ledge, crux moves in an awkward crack lead to the top of the cliff.  Although this route is only 35 feet long, it has surprisingly good rock and good moves.  Gear: ¾ to two inches, plus two four inch cams to make an anchor.  Walk off (the Ignorable Cliffs climber’s access trail leads to the High Peaks Trail which can be used to get back around to the base of the climb).    FA Party:  Robert Behrens, Josh Mucci.  FA Date:  April 10, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Robert Behrens while standing at its base; subsequent ascent of the route with Josh Mucci.

13.3  Gopher It  5.11a *  This 45 foot high route starts 80 feet right of Wild Berry Crack, around a sharp outside corner to the right of Battle Hamster.  An up-and-left ramp/thin crack leads to a steep, clean face.  One half to two inch gear protects the first few moves.  There is then a fixed piton in the up-and-left thin crack 15 feet from the start and a second in a horizontal crack five feet higher.  Three bolts protect the gently overhanging route crux.  Finish on a nice ledge and a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Brad Young, Josh Mucci, Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  November 11, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

13.51  Crampster  5.1  The routes Crampster and Hamsternomics (the next route below) both start from a ledge which is above and behind the route Supply Side Hamster.  Reach this ledge by climbing Supply Side Hamster, or, class three, by way of the “Hamster Hole,” a chimney/vertical tunnel located on the back side of the Supply Side Hamster buttress (to find the Hamster Hole, walk left and then back and right from the first bolt on Supply Side Hamster).  From the start ledge, Crampster follows an up-and-left ramp (with a protectable crack).  Pass a very small scrub oak and finish at the top of the cliff band.  It is 30 feet from the start ledge to the top of the cliff.  Gear: small to two inches.  FA Party:  Josh Mucci (solo).  FA Date:  March, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Josh Mucci while standing at its base; subsequent solo ascent of the route.

13.52  Hamsternomics  5.8  This route starts at the same point as the route Crampster.  Follow a discontinuous crack in a black water streak 30 feet straight up to the top of the cliff.  Good protection gives way to runout climbing at the top.  A pine tree on top of the cliff provides an anchor.  Walk off (the Ignorable Cliffs climber’s access trail leads to the High Peaks Trail which can be used to get back around to the base of the climb).  Gear: very small to one two inch piece.  FA Party:  Josh Mucci, Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  April 10, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Josh Mucci while standing at its base; subsequent ascent of the route with Alan Nilsson.

13.6  Supply Side Hamster  5.7 *  This route is 175 feet right of Wild Berry Crack, and 125 feet left of Pickpocket (which is the left-most route on Tourist Trap).  Three bolts protect climbing on mossy, but good rock 30 feet to the top of a long, narrow buttress (the holds used in making the climb are quite clean).  There is a one-bolt top anchor.  FA Party:  Robert Behrens, Josh Mucci.  FA Date:  April 17, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Robert Behrens while standing at its base; subsequent ascent of the route.

13.83  Dumpster - Left Chimney  5.3 R  The four “Dumpster” routes all share a start.  This start is 45 feet right of the bolted face route Supply Side Hamster and 80 feet left of the Tourist Trap route Pickpocket.  A low angle ramp/gully with twin cracks leads 45 feet to a more open, alcove-like area just below three separate and fairly parallel chimneys.  For Dumpster - Left Chimney, follow this ramp/gully to the base of, and then up, the left chimney to the top, 85 feet from the start.  Protection is very poor above the open, alcove-like area.  Belay way back, using the same pine tree as for Hamsternomics.  Walk off left (the Ignorable Cliffs climber’s access trail leads to the High Peaks Trail which can be used to get back around to the base of the climb).  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  November 11, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

13.84  Dumpster - Center Chimney  5.7 R  Dumpster’s center chimney is the only one that is readily visible from the start of these climbs.  Take gear from one to 3½ inches, with extra one to 1½ inch pieces for a hidden crack just below the crux.  Belay at the top from the same pine tree as for Hamsternomics.  Walk off left (the Ignorable Cliffs climber’s access trail leads to the High Peaks Trail which can be used to get back around to the base of the climb).  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang.  FA Date:  November 12, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

13.85  Dumpster - Right Chimney  5.3  Climb the right chimney from the open, alcove-like area.  The crux is reaching and then passing under the large, obvious chockstones near the top.  Walk off left (the Ignorable Cliffs climber’s access trail leads to the High Peaks Trail which can be used to get back around to the base of the climb).   FA Party:  Alan Nilsson.  FA Date:  April 24, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Alan Nilsson while standing at its base; solo ascent of the route a few minutes later.

13.86  Dumpster Exit  5.0  Climb as for the three Dumpster Chimney routes, but exit right from the open, alcove-like area at the base of the three chimneys.  Move over blocks and boulders around a buttress, to a horizontal ledge.  Continue on an easy face to the top of the cliff.  FA Party:  Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  April 10, 2011.  Source(s):  Description of the route from Robert Behrens while standing at its base; solo ascent of route April 24, 2011.

22.2  Old School  5.7  A two-pitch route that takes an indirect but easier line to the top of The Ignorable Cliffs.  Climb the first 25 feet of Beasto (at 5.7) before traversing right across the tops of pillars and blocks to belay at two fixed pins 70 feet from the start (both are modern pitons; they are four feet apart).  Start the second pitch (5.5) by moving eight feet right to the base of a wide, chimney-like slot.  Climb this to the top of the cliff (past a very old, fixed, ring-horizontal piton).  Use a pine tree 100 feet back from the cliff-top as an anchor.  Take gear from one-half to three inches to supplement the fixed pitons.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  December 2, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

22.4  Mountaineers Route  5.4  Another two-pitch route that is an even easier line.  Start as for Beasto and Old School.  Class four leads 10 feet to a wide ledge system.  Move horizontally to the right on this to the base of a somewhat loose, wide, up-and-right slot/ramp (now at the top of the route Left Arching Corner).  Continue up the slot 25 feet, past a fixed ring-angle piton, to a belay at a ledge with a juniper, 70 feet from the start.  From the belay, move slightly left to the base of a low-angle, right-facing corner/ramp and a fixed ring horizontal piton (now eight feet right of Old School’s second pitch slot).  Follow this corner/ramp, class four, up to a stance and another fixed ring horizontal piton.  The awkward route crux follows (over a low bulge); overcome it by way of a classic mountaineer's  move: a semi-lieback to a right butt-cheek "scootch." Continue up and left on easier ground, finishing at the same point as Old School.  Belay from the same pine 100 feet back from the cliff top.  Gear: small to one four inch piece and many runners.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Report of a fixed piton “right of Beasto” by Josh Mucci, approximately 2011; Investigation by rappel to cliff edge (looking for and finding a fixed piton) November 20, 2017; Ascent of route with Kathy Cook, John Cook, Jon Cochran, December 2, 2017.

24.1  The Road To Bagalaar 5.8 R  Start at the large arete just right of Bushwackin Dave.  A first bolt is visible 12 feet up. Continue up loose rock to the 2nd bolt which protects the 5.8 crux moves. From there look for a large knob; it is just above the 3rd bolt. Use a small (and marginal) nut placement in a flake 10 feet above the 3rd bolt (this is a horizontal placement in good rock - a long runner can also be slung around a knob out left, and the two equalized). Climbing above the nut is on good rock with a committing step left to a pocket and a mantle to a ledge. The climbing above the nut is run out 5.7. A two bolt, anchor with painted chain can be seen in the orange headwall above (good rock, both bolts are 3.25 inch x 3/8 inch Rawl 5-Piece). Further information: first bolt placed on stance: 2.75 inch x 3/8 inch Rawl 5-piece; second bolt placed from hooks: 3.25 inch x 3/8 inch Rawl 5-piece; third bolt placed from hooks: 2.75 inch x 3/8 inch Rawl 5-piece. FA party: Josh Mucci, Fabrizio Bittner, others. FA Date: January 17, 2009. Source(s): Emails from, and discussion with, Josh Mucci.

74.5  Jorgie Swallows  5.10d **  Start on Swallow Crack.  After 50 feet, move right to an overhanging arete/right-facing corner protected by a bolt (the route crux).  More 5.10 climbing leads up the right-facing corner to join the route Jorgie’s Continuation just below its bolt-protected crux.  Finish up that climb to the rim.  Protection: gear and a fixed piton for the first half of Swallow Crack and then three bolts.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  June 6, 2009.  Source(s): Postings to Mud’nCrud Forum, June, 2009; email from Gavin Emmons on January 20, 2020, after he added the lead bolt to his own first ascent.

83.5  Dreadlock Rasta  5.11a ***  An excellent, more difficult start to Buffalo Soldier.  Start 15 feet right of Ordeal.  Four bolts protect the first 45 feet (5.10 climbing, great rock).  Move left to join Buffalo Soldier, finishing on it, 100 feet from the start.  Protection consists of eight bolts and gear (one to three inches between the fourth and fifth bolts).  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Brian Hamilton.  FA Date:  January 11, 2020.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons, January 11, and 14 2020.

89.1 Jury Duty  5.7  This route starts at the top of The Verdict and climbs 35 feet to the rim by way of a left-leaning, crack-to-squeeze chimney, to a face. The climbing is on good rock, and is mostly easy. Finish at the Cleft bolt anchor. Gear: take six or so pieces, from small to four inches. FA Party: Unknown, but probably Gavin Emmons. FA Date: Unknown, but first confirmed on February 5, 2005. Source(s): Comments and beta from Gavin Emmons, who suggested that he had climbed this route many times and that it should be listed as a separate route; ascent of route with John Cook, April 20, 2014.

92.9 Gavin's Tangent 5.10a **  Start on Stupendous Man. From the ledge above the mantle section of that route, move up and slightly left to a single bolt. From that bolt, move up to an obvious corner/arch which allows a side-cling/under-cling leftward (good gear here, one to two inches). Clip the last bolt on Lithium and finish on that route. FA (of entire route as a free pitch): Probably Gavin Emmons. FA Date: March 5, 2009. Source(s): Postings to Mud'nCrud Forum, May, 2009. Additional sources: Consensus as to rating, stars, and quality of protection among climbers who climbed it March 20, 2010, including Brad Young, Alan Nilsson, Steve Dawson, "Jet," and about three others. On that date there were five separate leads of the route, and also several toprope ascents.

97.7  Casual Friday  5.2  Start on the big ledge at the Stupendous Man top anchor.  Move left six feet to a right-facing corner.  Climb this to a bolt 20 feet from the start (the bolt isn’t visible from the ledge).  Continue to the top of the cliff (consider slinging knobs for additional protection).  Belay using body position or make an anchor in nearby cracks (use gear from small to four inches).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date: June 28, 2019.  Source(s): Email and phone call from John Cook shortly after the route was established; follow-up email from Cook on October 21, 2019.

97.9 Lost Horizons - Fat Crack Finish 5.8 * This a variant finish to Lost Horizons (one that has obviously been done many times in the past and which is a significant enough variation to list as a separate route). Climb Lost Horizons to a point just before the first pitch's rightward traverse. Move slightly left here instead (toward the Stupendous Man bolt anchor). Follow a wide crack straight up to the end of Lost Horizons' normal second pitch. Pro: several medium to large cams for the first part of Lost Horizons, and a few four to five inch cams for the upper, wide crack. FA Party: Unknown. FA Date: Unknown. Source(s): Ascent of the route with Joe Denicola, January 13, 2012.

104.2  Straight Up  5.10a  A variant first half to route number 104, Roof. Start five or six feet to the right of that route's (corner) start. A short loose section leads straight up onto ledges, then onto solid rock and past two bolts.  Join Roof just after the start of its rightward traverse; finish to that route's intermediate anchor.  FA Party:  Matthew Footer, Greg Schaffer.  FA Date:  August 29, 2011. Source(s):  Emails from Matthew and Greg detailing the route; postings to Mud'nCrud Forum, October 31, 2011.

106.4 Taking the Wind Out of Your Mudsails  5.7 R  This route is located on the (small) northwest face of Discovery Wall, 70 feet right of the route Welcome to the Machine (route number 106). Approach this face through a gap in the brush where the High Peaks Trail comes closest to the wall. Follow an up-and-right ramp to its end 30 feet up (gear from small to two inches). From the end of the ramp move up 15 feet to a ledge (using a slung knob for protection). Traverse straight left from the ledge, ending the pitch on a big ledge with big trees. A class four chimney behind the trees leads to the top of the wall. The runout, upper traverse of this route is very serious for a follower (it is also serous for a leader). FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown.  Source(s): Ascents of the route are detailed in a February 22, 2014 post to the Mud'nCrud thread "Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the '07 Guidebook);" also, ascent of the route with Tricia Young, March 16, 2014.

172.8  West of the Sun  5.13d ***  This bolt-protected route is on the far left edge of The Monolith’s west face, just left of route number 174, Ranger Bolts (the first bolt on the route was placed years ago and is shown in the bottom left corner of the topo on page 78).  Seventeen bolts lead to the top of The Monolith, where this route shares a (newly replaced) multiple bolt anchor with Ranger Bolts. FA Party: Derek Powell (Karl Aguilar joined Derek in bolting the route).  FA Date:  December 22, 2011. Source(s): The route is detailed in two threads on Mud'nCrud Forum, started June 13, 2011 and December 23, 2011.

172.9  Hajime  5.13c **   This “link-up” route starts on West of the Sun.  After that route’s eighth bolt, move right onto Ranger Bolts and finish to the top.  FA Party: Derek Powell. FA Date: January 4, 2012.  Source(s):  The route is detailed in a thread on Mud'nCrud Forum.  The thread was started on December 23, 2011; the details of this particular route were posted January 12, 2012.

182.7 Miscegenation 5.12b **  Start between Black Dagger and Pearl Sheath. Five bolts protect very steep climbing on surprisingly good edges. Join Pearl Sheath at its last bolt; finish to that route's anchor.  FA Party: Mark Seelos, Adam Long.  FA Date: April 2, 2011.  Source(s): Posting to Mud'nCrud Forum, April 2, 2011.

191.8  Pistolero Pinnacle  Third Class  Pistolero Pinnacle is 100 feet west of Tiburcio’s X.  It has a steep, tall south side (facing the reservoir).  The north side is much shorter and is class three.  There is one old bolt on top.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Sighting of summit bolt and ascent of route February 8, 2011.

191.9  Bandit Chimney  5.5 R  This is the obvious chimney that separates Tiburcio’s X from the formation to its immediate left.  Start 30 feet left of Cross Your Heart.  Finish 25 to 30 feet south (toward the reservoir) of the obvious, large chockstone wedged in the top of the chimney (it is also possible to exit the chimney, class three, below this chockstone).  Pro: Two to four inch cams can be used in horizontal cracks.  There is no top anchor, walk north on the top of the rock to the obvious pine (three old bolts found on top of this formation are hangerless and/or in the wrong location for a belay).  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Inspection of the top of the separate formation and sighting of three bolts there (two out on the south end of the rock and one, rusty and hangerless, above the center of the chimney); ascent of route February 8, 2011.

192.5  Blister in the Sun  5.11a *  This route starts on Coyote Ugly but finishes on the face to the left of that route.  Climb Coyote Ugly to the up-and-left ledge that extends to the top anchor of Cross Your Heart. Before reaching that anchor climb directly up past seven bolts to the Tiburcio’s X top anchor. Pro:  bolts and gear from one half to two inches (use long slings) for the traverse from Coyote Ugly. FA Party:  Dave Alfrey, Scott Lappin.  FA Date:  October 23, 2011.  Source(s): Posting to Mud'nCrud Forum, October 28, 2011; Facebook “Pinnacles” page, postings starting October 26, 2011.

195.5  Tiburcio’s Y  5.6  This route ascends the 95 foot long, blunt, north arete of the Tiburcio’s X formation.  The route can be seen best from the Rim Trail where the northeast side of this pinnacle comes closest to the trail.  Walk up slabs from that point, 40 feet to the route’s start.  The route has only four protection bolts, but they protect the route well enough so that it does not deserve an "R" rating.  FA Party:  Bruce Hildenbrand, Clint Cummins.  FA Date:  February 10, 2015.  Source(s):  From Mud‘nCrud Forum, “Rebolting” thread February 10, 2015; ascent of route, April 18, 2015.

196.8  Hard Knocks  5.8  Hard Knocks climbs to Teaching Rock’s separate, north summit (which is about 20 feet lower in height than the formation’s main summit).  Start left of the route Teaching Left on the formation’s west flank.  One bolt protects crux moves into a slot/chimney.  The chimney gets progressively easier and leads to the top, 45 feet from the start.  Gear:  one 3½ inch piece fits nicely about halfway up the chimney (a six inch cam can also be placed but doesn’t sit well).  There is a two-bolt anchor on the summit, about 20 feet north of where the climbing ends.  Descent: make a 65 foot rappel to the base, down and left from the start of the route.  Note:  The first ascent of this route was made to investigate a new-looking bolt spotted on top of this north summit during an inspection from above (in early 2016).  It was quite obvious after the climb that this route had not been done before (before the lead bolt was placed, it would have required unprotected, somewhat loose, slick 5.8 moves over a leg-breaking, long fall).  There was no evidence on the route itself that it had previously been climbed.  Also, the north summit is surrounded by steep faces that wouldn’t be climbable without bolts for protection, and there are none.  The other side of the slot/chimney (the east side) is climbable at what looks like easy fifth class (on loose, unprotected rock), but a massive poison oak bush chokes the top third of that chimney, making any past ascent by that means very unlikely.  Finally, the found bolt is 20 feet from the end of this route, closer to the formation’s northeast side, and the hanger was (originally) oriented toward the east.    This March 20, 2017 effort appears to be a first ascent.  Unfortunately though, the origin of the single bolt is still a mystery.  Further note:  In creating a summit anchor it seemed best to re-orient the existing bolt’s hanger toward the west and place only one more bolt instead of placing two new bolts at a different location closer to the end of the climbing.  FA Party:  Brad Young, David Knopp, Russ Pasley.  FA Date:  March 20, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

203.3  The Gopher  5.7  The Gopher is a long formation which is west of (uphill from), and across The Rim Trail from Teaching Rock.  It runs uphill from near the trail. It culminates in a high point on which is balanced an oblong, 20 foot diameter boulder (The Gopher's head).  Approach this boulder, class two, from its uphill side (the boulder/high point is about 100 feet from the trail).  A few moves over a bulge lead onto the top of the boulder (which is the top of the formation).  There is no summit anchor (downclimb).  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent and report of route by Robert Behrens, March 5, 2011; subsequent viewing of route with Behrens and solo ascent; March 13, 2011.

203.4  The Proctor  5.6  The Proctor is a small pinnacle located 100 feet north of The Gopher, and 150 feet above (west of) The Rim Trail (The Proctor is the closest to the trail of several rocks/pinnacles on this part of the hillside).  It is possible to walk onto the top of the rock from its uphill side (there is one old bolt on top).  The climbing route is on the downhill side of the rock; an up-and-right crack leads 15 feet to face climbing, which leads 15 more feet to the top of the rock.  Gear:  this route takes surprisingly good protection to one inch.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s): Ascent and report of route by Robert Behrens, March 5, 2011; subsequent viewing and ascent of route with Behrens; March 13, 2011.

203.61 Where's Dave?  5.5 *  This route is the first to be established on The Toe. The Toe is one of two significant formations which are on the northeast side of the reservoir, about three-quarters of the way from the dam to The Watchmen, and about 100 feet above the reservoir's high water mark (there are also several, much smaller pinnacles in the vicinity of The Toe and its neighbor - described next in order - Topsy Turvy). Both The Toe and Topsy Turvy are shown generally on the maps on pages 126 and 152 of the 2007 guidebook (but neither is named on those maps). The formation Topsy Turvy is most easy to identify - it consists of a 15 foot diameter ball of rock balanced precariously on a pedestal made up of another large rock. The Toe is 40 feet to the southeast (closer to the dam) from Topsy Turvy. Where's Dave? is on the northwest side of The Toe. Move right (southwest) onto an obvious ledge below an sharp, short overhang (and above a 20 foot drop). One bolt low protects the first crux, moving over the overhang. Easy moves lead to a second bolt and a second crux. There are two bolts on the spacious summit, 40 feet from the start of the climb.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, Sonja Raub, David Foss, Deb Thompson.  FA Date:  April 13, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

203.62 Topsy Turvy  A1  Topsy Turvy is 40 feet to the northwest of The Toe (see description immediately above). It consists of a 15 foot diameter ball of rock balanced precariously on a pedestal made up of another large rock. There is one old, rusty bolt on top. Make a long rope toss and use ascenders to reach the summit. EDIT: Topsy Turvy was also freed by Adam Long on April 19, 2014, on toprope, using a weird belay scheme that involved the whole rope passed over the summit and pulled in as he climbed. He thought the climbing was 5.11.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown.  Source(s):  Self, observed an old, rusty bolt on top of the formation and inspected its entire base and sides to determine that no other possible means of ascent exists other than the "rope chuck and prusik," up-the-rope method; ascent of route on April 19, 2014.

203.7  Mug Shot  5.7 *  This route is on a rock face that is 300 feet straight uphill (northwest) from The Toe (the route faces right at The Toe and the reservoir). Look for two 50 to 60 foot high formations with a shorter rock between them. Start at the base of the left formation at the bottom of a steep down-and-left ramp which descends from the middle/shorter rock.  Move straight up past two bolts, then up and right past two more bolts, before moving up and left past two more (six bolts total in 50 feet). There are three bolts on top for an anchor. Eight feet of class four lead off the formation's north side; from there walk around to the west and south back to the base of the route.  FA Parties: (toprope) mudworm Xi, Dennis Erik Mr Mud; (lead) John Cook, Brad Young, Jon Cochran, Bob Walton, Kathy Cook.  FA Dates: (toprope) April 20, 2014; (lead) December 29, 2014.  Source(s):  Discussions about the route with the toprope first ascent party (and an OK from them to bolt the climb on lead); self, part of group that made the first lead of the route.

204.3  The Knight’s Watch  5.8  This route is on the south (the reservoir) side of North Watchman.  Start at the formation’s lowest point.  Clip two bolts (both are shared with the next route on the list, The White Walker) then diverge slightly left.  Four more bolts protect the rest of the climb (six bolts total in 90 feet).  There is a two-bolt anchor on top of North Watchman; this allows an 80 foot rappel to the ground.  FA Party:  John Cook, Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 3, 2014.  Source(s):  Email of May 3, 2014, from John Cook confirming that the route was finished; self, present for most of the route’s bolting on April 20, 2014; ascent of route with Bob Walton, May 7, 2014.

204.4  The White Walker  5.10a  This route is also on the south side of North Watchman.  Clip the first two bolts of The Knight’s Watch before diverging right.   Continue past two more bolts to lower angle rock.  A long run-out (possible 2 ½ inch cam) leads to a ledge below a headwall.  Move right to one more bolt.  Crux moves over a steep bulge lead to easier climbing and the two-bolt anchor, 95 feet from the start (fun climbing, but moving right on the ledge to the crux is contrived).  FA Party: Brad Young, Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  April 20, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

205.1  Watch Those Jams  5.8  An alternate way to summit South Watchman.  Start the regular route (the 5.3), but from the shoulder of rock (where the regular route traverses left), move slightly right (west).  Climb a loose crack (nice hands at the top) to the base of the summit boulder.  Gear: two each, two to four inches.  FA Party:  Adam Long.  FA Date:  April 19, 2014.  Source(s):  Report that day by Adam Long and also by John Cook who was climbing the regular South Watchman route at the same time; ascent of route with Bob Walton, May 7, 2014.

219.8  Muffin Top  5.9 *  Like the route The Love Handles, Muffin Top is on the north side of The Love Handles’ formation (the side facing at The Upper Crust).  Muffin Top is located just left (east) of the chimney that splits this pinnacle (see page 91 of the 2007 guidebook for a topo that shows the formation and this chimney).  Four protection bolts lead to lower angle climbing and a fifth (directional) bolt.  Continue a total of 70 feet from the start to the two-bolt anchor on top.  Make a class three descent down the formation’s south side.  FA Party:  Julius De La Pena, John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  November 1, 2015.  Source(s): Email from John Cook, November 2, 2015; ascent of route, November 14, 2015.

226.5  Twisted Sister  5.9 *  This route ascends the far right side of the west face of The First Sister.  What is now the first bolt on this route is shown on the topo on page 94 of the guidebook (the bolt was a 3/8 inch Star Dryvin and has now been replaced).   Five bolts protect climbing over four obvious bulges.  Each bulge presents slightly easier climbing than the one before (in other words, the first bulge is the crux of the route).  After the fourth bulge, 50 more feet of unprotected 5.0 leads to the right-most (south) First Sister summit anchor.  FA Party:  Jim McConachie, Alan Nilsson, Brad Young, Robert Behrens, Josh Mucci, Bill McConachie.  FA Date:  April 24, 2011.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

235.1  Pleiades  5.9 *  This reachy route climbs Third Sister’s west face to the notch in its summit and then joins the East Face route to the formation's high point.  Start at the top of the chimney between the Second and Third Sisters (the same place that Third Sister Approach - Northwest Face starts). An anchor can be made here for a belayer using a big loop of rope over the pillar that is to the west (this pillar is to one's back when starting Pleiades).  Five bolts and one fixed piton protect climbing up and right and then up to the notch.  The East Face route’s third bolt makes up Pleiades sixth (and last) bolt.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  January 7, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

236.2 Your Sister... 5.5 This route and the next one listed below (Kid Sister) are both located on the "large shoulder of rock" described in the 2007 guidebook under route number 236, "Third Sister Approach - Northeast Gully." Both routes start from the ground and end about 45 feet higher, at a two bolt anchor near a large pine. Both climbs are found between the chimney start of route number 235 "Third Sister Approach - Northwest Face," and the water streak shown to that start's left in the topo on page 92 of the 2007 book. Both climbs are nice, additional "approach pitches" to get to the base of the east face of the Third Sister and the routes that start there. This is the right route (the two are listed right to left, consistent with the routes on either side of them). Climb past three bolts on the blunt arete to the left of the chimney between the Second and Third Sisters. The crux is low. The name is intended to be short for a longer but undefined phrase, such as "Your Sister Wears Army Boots." FA Party: Bruce Hildenbrand, Clint Cummins. FA Date: February, 2013. Source(s): Mungeclimber's April 14, 2013 posting to the Mud'nCrud thread "Newly Established and Found routes (Since the 2007 Guidebook);" further discussion about that route on that thread; ascent of route May 9, 2013.

236.3 Kid Sister 5.6 This route starts ten feet left of Your Sister.... It is steeper than that route. Climb past two bolts before moving up and slightly right to join Your Sister at its third bolt. FA Party: Clint Cummins, Bruce Hildenbrand. FA Date: February, 2013. Source(s): Mungeclimber's April 14, 2013 posting to the Mud'nCrud thread "Newly Established and Found routes (Since the 2007 Guidebook);" further discussion about that route on that thread; ascent of route May 9, 2013.

240.9 One For the Bambinos 5.2  This short route is located on the slender north face of a small rock which abuts the north side of Fifth Sister (a climber about to do the exposed crux of the route Fifth Sister - West Face is standing on the top of this small rock, having moved there, class three, from its east side). Two protection bolts in 25 feet lead to the top of the small rock and a two-bolt belay. FA party: Mark Fletcher. FA date: November 30, 2015. Source(s): Correspondence about the route from Mark Fletcher, December 3, 2015; ascent of the route with John Cook on December 19, 2015.

253.1 Maid in the Shade 5.4 This short route ascends a small, separate pinnacle, starting eight feet right of On a Pale Horse (the rightmost route on Marmot Wall). Move up and slightly right on good rock until it becomes possible to tie off a sturdy tree branch, ten feet up the route. Two very closely spaced bolts then protect the route crux. Ten more feet of dirty climbing lead to the summit and a two bolt anchor 30 feet from the start of the climb. FA party: Mark Fletcher. FA date: December 12, 2015. Source(s): Correspondence about the route from Mark Fletcher, December 13, 2015; ascent of the route with Tricia Young, John and Kathy Cook on December 27, 2015.

259.12  Trifecta  5.8  This long slab route is the first of several routes on this list which is located at The Northeast Frontier. This previously unreported area is located northeast of Marmot Rocks (and is partially visible from there). A description of the whole area is given first.
The Northeast Frontier:  The Northeast Frontier is located one-third of a mile northeast of Marmot Rocks.  Two of the Northeast Frontier formations are easy to see from near the Marmot Rocks route Marauder; they are on a ridge, silhouetted against the skyline. These two formations are Weathertop (the obvious, steep-sided, pyramid-shaped pinnacle on the right) and Violet Pinnacle (the bread-loaf shaped rock which is to the immediate left/north of Weathertop).  Although Weathertop and Violet Pinnacle can be seen from near Marauder, other routes at The Northeast Frontier are not visible from there (most other routes are on formations that are on the other side of the ridge and face east).  The easiest-to-find approach to The Northeast Frontier is from The Marmot Rocks.  Walk north from there, along the ridge-line before traversing east directly toward Violet Pinnacle.  A quicker, heavily used, but harder-to-find approach has also been made directly up from the middle section of the East Side parking area.  This second approach is steep but is more direct and can be done completely brush-free (it takes about 45 minutes). The more direct approach is definitely harder to find though and so it is probably better to learn this approach by hiking down it when returning to parking from the crag (before trying to go up it). When taking this more direct route back to parking, move uphill/north from Violet Pinnacle to the top of the ridge, then continue north along the crest for about 200 yards before moving down through open, blue-oak woodland, avoiding concentrations of brush, directly to the middle part of East Side parking.  Explanatory Note: All of the routes at The Northeast Frontier are figuratively located “between” routes 259 (Peaches and Cream at Marmot Wall) and route 260 (The High Chair, below the Yaks Wall), and so they all bear the number 259 followed by decimal numbers appropriate to their location compared to the other routes there. Unlike other, similar situations where a route or two is found “between” other routes and then receives a number, there are more than a dozen climbs in this area and as a result some of the decimal numbers are long.
This Route:  The route Trifecta is found on The South Downs, which is the long cliff/slab located immediately south of Weathertop.  Trifecta is located about one-quarter of the way right/uphill from the formation’s south (left/downhill) end (the end away from Weathertop).  Two bolts lead into a square-cut slot.  This slot protects with two more bolts.  Finish the slot, clip a fifth bolt and then move right to join Soap Box Slab at its fourth bolt (about halfway up).  Finish up that route.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  February 24, 2018.  Source(s):  Witnessed first ascent as it was being finished.

259.13  Soap Box Slab  5.7  Soap Box Slab starts 15 feet up and right from Trifecta.  The route’s first two bolts can be seen from the ground.  A one-to-three foot deep, right-facing corner helps in locating the route; this extends from just above the first bolt to above the second bolt.  Six bolts total protect 95 feet of climbing.  Cross over the top of the cliff to make a body-position belay.  Scramble off right (north).  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  March 22, 2015.  Source(s):  First ascentionist John Cook pointed out the climb immediately after the route’s first ascent; ascent of route minutes later with Aaron McDonald.

259.3  Strider  5.9 *  Strider is on Weathertop, the only large, separate pinnacle at The Northeast Frontier (it is 45 feet high).  The route Strider climbs the northeast side of Weathertop.  Three bolts protect 45 feet of climbing to a wonderful summit and a two bolt anchor (set up to rappel off the south side of the formation).  The climbing on this route is merely OK; the star is given for the pinnacle’s location and for the cool summit.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 12, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

259.4  Violets Aren’t Blue  5.8  Violets Aren’t Blue is on the east side of Violet Pinnacle (stage in a pretty, viewful, flat spot just east of the pinnacle itself).  Crux moves off the ground lead to a stance, one bolt and then the top, just over 20 feet up.  There is a single-bolt top anchor.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Brad Young, John Cook, Bob Walton, Tricia Young, Rachel Cochran.  FA Date:  February 17, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

259.911  Black Snake  5.7 *  This route and several that follow (those that have numbers starting with 259.9) are located on an east-facing cliff/slab called The North Downs. The North Downs faces southeast (into Frog Canyon).  It is about 100 yards north of Violet Pinnacle.  Most of the cliff face is visible (in side-view) from near Violet Pinnacle.  Also, by way of further identifying features, the left side of this cliff is noticeably undercut.  Routes here are listed from left to right.  Black Snake climbs the thin, very black water streak in the left side of the face.  Start by moving over the overhang.  Continue past two bolts before moving up and right, across a crack (one to two inch gear) to a two-bolt anchor, 70 feet up (the anchor is also shared with the next three routes).  FA Party:  John Cook, Bob Walton, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  February 17, 2014.  Source(s):  Discussion about and view of route with Jon Cochran before it was established; discussion about route with John Cook and Bob Walton after it was led; ascent of route March 16, 2014.

259.912  Snake Eyes  5.8  Most of this route is in a water chute 15 feet right of Black Snake (the chute doesn’t reach the ground).  The crux is the start - up a very short, vertical headwall.  Once into the chute, pass a fixed pin, and use gear (small to two inches) in a crack.  A second bulge (5.7) leads to easier climbing.  Use an extra long sling over a mini-pinnacle before moving up and right to the shared two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Brad Young.  FA Date:  March 15, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

259.913  Snake Charmer  5.6  Start five feet right of Snake Eyes.  Slab moves lead 15 feet to a bolt.  Continue past two more bolts, joining Snake Eyes to finish at the common, two-bolt anchor. Note that the first lead of this route was made by Cook, without what is now the third bolt; the first ascent party then agreed that a third bolt was needed to prevent ground fall on subsequent ascents; they added it the same day.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  March 15, 2014.  Source(s):  Self (watched the first ascent while it was in progress and then did the second ascent).

259.914  Pain in the Asp  5.4  A large, left-facing corner divides The North Downs into a left third and a right two-thirds.  Pain in the Asp climbs this corner.  It is 65 feet from the start of the route to the shared two-bolt anchor.  Pro: two to four inches.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  March 15, 2014.  Source(s):  Self (watched the first ascent while it was in progress and then did the second ascent).

259.915  Hood of the Cobra  5.7 *  Start Pain in the Asp, but after 25 feet move up-and-right into a prominent water chute and the first bolt.  Continue on fun stemming past two more bolts to a flat spot above the chute.  Easy fifth class (and one more bolt) leads to the true summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Gear: a few large cams (for the first part of the route).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Jon Cochran, Brad Young.  FA Date:  May 10, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party; email from John Cook, May 10, 2014, detailing the route’s first lead; subsequent ascent of route with them, December 14, 2014.

259.931  Reticulated  5.9  Climb the blunt arete right of Pain in the Asp (begin 10 feet down and right from the start of that route).  Five bolts protect 70 feet of climbing.  A two-bolt anchor 25 feet back serves this route and Pit Viper (walk off from here or move to the Pain in the Asp anchor to rappel). Note that the first lead of this route was made by McDonald without what are now the second and third bolts; recognizing that the route was "X" rated in that state, McDonald asked the second ascent party to add bolts so that the climb wasn't a "death route."  FA Party:  Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran, John Cook, Gavin Emmons, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  April 18, 2014.  Source(s):  Description of the route from route authors on the day of their ascent; subsequent ascent of route with them, December 14, 2014.

259.935  Holy Snakebite (Batman)  5.10a *  Start thirty feet right of Reticulated and 10 feet left of Pit Viper.  Move into a very shallow chute (just right of a steeper, deeper chute).  Three closely spaced bolts protect climbing on a hole-filled face, over a bulge to a slab.  Move up and right to the routes’ fourth bolt.  Continue straight up past two more bolts (six lead bolts total) to top out just left of Pit Viper.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, Brian Hamilton, Caleb Rightmyer, Layton Rightmyer, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  February 24, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

259.936  Pit Viper  5.10c ***  Pit Viper ascends a deep water chute 40 feet right of Reticulated. It is a well protected route that requires intense stemming.  Seven bolts and one fixed piton protect 70 feet of climbing.  Walk back 20 feet from the end of the climb to the two-bolt anchor shared with Reticulated.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Brad Young, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  December 22, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

259.937  Danger Noodle  5.10b  Start 35 feet right/uphill from Pit Viper.  Look for a bolt eight feet up on a short overhang, just below a U-shaped notch.  Height dependent moves through the notch lead to a wide bowl and a second bolt.  Move left and up past a third  bolt to a fourth, now on the face left of the water chute that makes up Pit Viper.  Continue up past two more bolts (six lead bolts total) before topping out and moving back to the Pit Viper anchor.  FA Party:  Brian Hamilton, Brad Young, Whitney Reynier, Jon Cochran, Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  February 17, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

259.942  Sidewinder  5.6  Sidewinder is located on the north-most, slabby part of The North Downs.  It starts 25 feet right of a low angle, broken chimney/gully which is around and right from Pit Viper (this broken chimney divides the left two-thirds of The North Downs from the right one-third).  Climb straight up past three bolts to an overlap/roof (optional three to four inch cam here).  Crux moves lead into a shallow water chute.  One more bolt protects progressively easier climbing to the summit and a two-bolt anchor 75 feet up.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  December 22, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, watched route being established and made a second ascent of it minutes later.

259.945  Inchworm  5.7  This route starts 60 feet right of Sidewinder (although it isn’t actually possible to walk directly from the base of one to the other - go down and out from the base first).  To get to this route’s start, walk onto a very large boulder from the right.  Three bolts protect slab climbing to the start of a wide crack.  Finish up the crack (gear from three to five inches).  FA Party:  Caleb Rightmyer, Jon Cochran, John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  January 1, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, watched route being established and made a second ascent of it minutes later.

264.4  Bruce’s Escape  5.6  There are three routes located on the wall across the corridor from (west of) The Yaks Pinnacles (only one of these, Beast of Burden, is in the 2007 guidebook).  Bruce’s Escape is the left-most of these routes; it is directly across that corridor from the route South Yak-West Face.  Climb a 35 foot high, right-facing corner protected by two bolts.  Move around and on to the top of a block before continuing on easier terrain (with trees to tie-off) 35 more feet to the rim at another tree.  FA Party:  Bruce Hildenbrand, Clint Cummins.  FA Date:  April 5, 2016.  Source(s):  Posting by Hildenbrand to Mud‘nCrud thread “Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the ‘07 Guidebook)” April 6, 2016; ascent of route with John Cook, April 15, 2016.

264.7  Clint’s Escape  5.6 R  Clint’s Escape is located 40 feet right of Bruce’s Escape and 60 feet left (south) of Beast of Burden.  Start on a large boulder.  Clip a bolt before moving slightly left into a clean water streak.  Two more bolts protect moves to the top of the streak, 35 feet from the start (all three bolts on this route are just to the right of the streak).  Exiting the streak is the route crux.  Another 30 feet of climbing follows:  move up a grassy gully past a small tree to a pillar of stacked blocks.  Climb over this before moving left to easy ground.  FA Party:  Clint Cummins, Lynn Murphy.  FA Date: 1996 (note that Cummins on-sight free soloed this route in 1996; he subsequently added bolts to it in 2016).  Source(s):  Posting by Hildenbrand to Mud‘nCrud thread “Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the ‘07 Guidebook)” April 6, 2016; ascent of route with Matt Ellis, April 15, 2016.

273.2  Cheeso Pani  5.9 ***  Climb the streak/scoop just right of Tato Pani’s first pitch, ending at the same belay as that pitch (this belay has a second bolt now - it was placed by Cheeso Pani/Tato Pani first ascent author Jon McConachie).  The route  protects well, with two bolts, a slung "ear" of rock (amazingly solid) and gear (take cams from one to three inches, with extra two inch pieces).  FA Party:  Jim and Jon McConachie.  FA Date:  November 23, 2012.  Source(s):  Email dated November 24, 2012 from Jim McConachie; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons, January 16, 2013.

286.5  Boulder on the Shoulder  5.1  This 25 foot high pinnacle is located just north of the small stream which is followed when hiking to Hanging Valley.  It is 150 yards upstream from The Sisters (and The Sisters are easily visible from it).  Look for a 10 foot high boulder perched on a larger pinnacle’s northwest side.  Climb the squeeze chimney between the boulder and the main formation before stepping over and moving to the summit.  Descend by downclimbing (or do a Pinnacles rappel).  Note: although this pinnacle is only 25 feet high, it is located all by itself, it is free-standing and it is as tall as nearby Pinky Pinnacle, which has long been considered a route.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  February 17, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook regarding this (and other routes in the area) shortly after his ascent; solo ascent of route April 15, 2016.

287.2  Sweet Caroline  5.8 *  This route and the two that follow are on a previously unclimbed formation called Kat Pinnacle. Kat Pinnacle is 250 feet west of Kasparek's Pinnacle, and 250 feet north (uphill) of Pinky Pinnacle. It is a fairly large, independent pinnacle with a north-to-south split through the summit (a noticeable manzanita grows in the split). Sweet Caroline and Kentucky Woman both ascend the apron of clean rock on the pinnacle's southeast side (the normal approach to Hanging Valley goes right under these two routes). Sweet Caroline starts with easy moves, up and left, to the top of a rounded, ten foot high shoulder of rock (protection crack on the right). Twenty feet of easy slab climbing then lead past one bolt to an up-and-right crack. Odd, fun, and well protected moves up this crack lead to a large ledge at the top of the apron. There is a two-bolt anchor on the face above the widest part of this ledge, 55 feet from the start of the route (the anchor is just below the start of the route Cracklin' Rosie, which climbs above the ledge to the pinnacle's summit). Descend along the ledge, to the right (exposed class three). Gear: from one to 2 1/2 inches for the lower crack, and from 1 1/4 to four inches for the upper crack. FA Party: Brad Young, John Cook. FA Date: January 25, 2016. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

287.4  Kentucky Woman  5.7 **  The most noticeable part of Kat Pinnacle's southeast apron is a clean, rounded arete. Kentucky Woman climbs this arete past four bolts in 50 feet. Finish at the same ledge and anchor as for Sweet Caroline. Note: the first bolt on this route was placed relatively low so that it actually protects the route's first crux. FA Party: Brad Young, John Cook. FA Date: January 25, 2016. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

287.8 Cracklin' Rosie 5.9  Cracklin' Rosie climbs above the ledge that extends along Kat Pinnacle's east side (the same ledge where Sweet Caroline and Kentucky Woman end). Approach the route's start from the north (uphill) side of the pinnacle by way of exposed class three along the ledge to the two-bolt, Kentucky Woman top anchor (the ledge is 50 feet off the ground at this point, so these bolts also serve as a start belay for Cracklin' Rosie). Two closely spaced bolts protect the 15 foot high face above the anchor. Finish in a low-angle water chute to another two-bolt belay, 30 feet from the start (and then summit Kat Pinnacle by way of an easy 20 foot scramble from this upper anchor). FA Party: Brad Young, John Cook, Noal Elkins. FA Date: January 3, 2016. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

294.4  Step Down Regimen  5.2  This is one of two routes on the uphill side of Prednisone Pinnacle.  Prednisone is located 100 feet uphill (southeast) from Hidden Pinnacle, near the top of the ridge separating Hanging Valley from Frog Canyon. Its downhill side is quite tall (about 65 feet). Step Down Regimen ascends the left (southwest) side of the 20 foot high, uphill face of the pinnacle.  Move left on a ledge several feet before moving up over a series of small “steps” to the summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Gear:  1 ½ to 2 ½ inches.  FA Party:  John Cook.   FA Date:  February 17, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook regarding this (and other routes in the area) shortly after his ascent; solo ascent of route April 15, 2016.  

294.5  All Jacked Up  5.5  Climb Prednisone Pinnacle’s 20 foot high uphill face.  A short, class four groove leads to a shoulder.  One bolt protects moves from there to the summit and a two-bolt anchor (shared with Step Down Regimen).  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.   FA Date:  February 21, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook regarding this (and other routes in the area) shortly after his ascent; ascent of route April 15, 2016.

298.3  The Overlook  Class Four *  The Overlook is the end point in a series of summits that extend 250 feet southwest from The Wad.  Of these summits, The Wad is highest and farthest to the northeast.  The Overlook is a lower summit, but situated as it is at the end point, it has a very nice, 320 degree view.  Reach The Overlook’s summit by intricate and fun class two, three, and four.  From the base of the starting slab on The Wad, move down and left 100 feet.  Just where this downhill turns into a drop-off, step over a low wall onto a ramp.  The ramp leads slightly down, 60 feet to brush and trees (and a drop-off below).  Class four leads across a slab, above the brush, to a gully.  The gully leads up (to the northwest) toward the series of summits.  Move along and among them to a notch on the northeast side of the last summit, The Overlook.  Twenty-five feet of class three leads to its top.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of route March 7, 2018.

299.9  Extra Point  5.9 (TR)  Climb the steep, loose northeast face of South Goal Post (just left of the class four route on that formation; join that route to top out).  FA Party:  Bruce Hildenbrand.  FA Date:  March 3, 2015.  Source(s):  From Mud‘nCrud Forum, “Rebolting” thread March 10, 2015; ascent of route, April 19, 2015.

300.5  North Goal Post - Shortcut  5.6  Move onto a long, low shoulder of rock that extends southeast from North Goal Post to near South Goal Post.  Walk 40 feet to a point below North Goal Post’s short northeast face.  Step around onto the north face and the second lead bolt of North Goal Post - Original.  Finish on that route to the top and the two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of route March 7, 2018.

301.1 East Wizard Pinnacle - Regular Route  Class Four   West and East Wizard Pinnacles are located on top of Kasperek’s Ridge about 150 feet north of the Goal Posts and 100 feet south of the route Sorcerer of Slab.  There is a large chimney between the two (the chimney is called a "chasm" in the 2007 guidebook’s description of Sorcerer of Slab; a climber walks through the chimney on the way to routes farther north, including Sorcerer of Slab and The Yaks). East Wizard is much larger and somewhat taller than its “twin” (East Wizard is especially tall on its east and southeast sides). East Wizard Pinnacle - Regular Route is the only easy way to this pinnacle's summit. Start on the right side of the formation’s southwest side. Move up a low angle chimney for 20 feet before stemming up and out of the chimney onto a large flat area. Move north along a six foot high rock face to where it can be climbed with a few class four moves. Walk from here to the highest of the several East Wizard Pinnacle summits. FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery and ascent of route with John Cook, February 1, 2016 (the rock had enough evidence of prior ascents/wear marks in the rock that this didn't seem to be a first ascent).

301.5  The Chamber of Secrets  5.5  This short climb starts in the chasm/chimney between the two Wizard Pinnacles. Ascend two squeeze chimneys, one above the other, on the northeast face of West Wizard (the left formation when walking north). From the top of the second squeeze step north, onto the highest part of this pinnacle.  Move another ten feet north to the two-bolt anchor for Wizard’s Wall (next on this list).  Gear: two medium cams provide very nice protection in the (more difficult) upper squeeze chimney.  FA Party:  Brian Hamilton, Brad Young, Matt Ellis.  FA Date:  April 19, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

301.6  Wizard’s Wall  5.10a **  This route is on West Wizard Pinnacle’s north face (start in the northwest end of the chimney/chasm which is between the two Wizard Pinnacles).  Climb 40 feet past five bolts.  A two-bolt anchor allows a rappel descent.  FA Party:  Clint Cummins, Bruce Hildenbrand.  FA Date:  March 17, 2015.  Source(s):  From Mud‘nCrud Forum, “Rebolting” thread March 30, 2015; ascent of route, April 19, 2015.

302.1  The Turtle  5.3  This small formation sits on a ridge top all by itself.  It is 350 feet northeast of the north end of The Old Man and 600 feet south-southeast of Gertie’s Pinnacle (which is along the same ridge top).  Approach The Turtle from the Chalone Peak Trail at a point well above the reservoir but not quite to the saddle where a use-trail leads left to The Driver and The Yaks.  Look for a sharp right turn in the trail at a point nearly level with The Driver.  Exit right up a small wash just after the sharp right turn but before a very sharp left turn.  A mostly brush-free passage can be made 100 yards to the top of the ridge.  Move another hundred yards due north along the ridge, through scattered brush to The Turtle’s south side.  Begin climbing on the formation’s northwest side.  A 20 foot class four ramp leads around the east side of the summit to the base of a short, undercut upper southeast face.  Ten more feet of climbing lead to the top.  Descend by an exposed downclimb or by a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Explored the formation with John Cook, January, 2016 (backed off from halfway up due to wet conditions); Email from Cook on May 2, 2016, regarding his and Kathy Cook’s ascent.

302.21  Excursion Time Continuum  5.4  Excursion Time Continuum is located on Excursion Club Pinnacle, a small formation located on the ridgetop uphill (west) from the top of Cortadura Wall.  This and other tiny-to-small pinnacles are encountered while walking to The Old Man (described below).  Reach the area by hiking up Chalone Peak Trail from the reservoir.  Continue to and past the saddle near The Driver, heading toward Cortadura Wall.  Leave the trail 150 feet beyond the saddle, still well before Cortadura Wall (about 100 feet before a solitary pinnacle that sits just above the right side of the trail).  Move right/uphill/due west through clear areas (with one or two brushy passages) to the mostly brush-free ridge top near two tiny pinnacles.  Turn left/south (still on the ridge top) and move 50 yards to two 30 to 35 foot high pinnacles.  Of these two, Excursion Club Pinnacle is to the left (east) and Bat Pinnacle to the right (west).  The route Excursion Time Continuum climbs past two bolts on the blunt arete closest to Bat Pinnacle (that is, on the right side of this formation’s west face).  There is a two-bolt anchor on the slender top, 30 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Sam Steuart, Ryan Walker, Bryson Smith, Bob Walton, Tricia Young, Bill Flaherty, Kim Ullrich.  FA Date:  April 29, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.22  Bat Pinnacle  5.3 R  Bat Pinnacle is the right-most of two 30 to 35 foot high pinnacles encountered on the approach to The Old Man (it is southwest of Excursion Club Pinnacle).  Bat is 35 feet high at its highest point (on its northeast side, toward  Excursion Club Pinnacle).  It is 25 feet high on its uphill (southwest) side.  When viewed from the west, the formation resembles a bat.  Start climbing on Bat’s southeast side.  A ramp leads to a stance below a low-angle arete which extends south from the summit.  Move onto this arete and then to the summit, 30 feet from the start.  Descend using a Pinnacles rappel.  There is no protection on this route and its crux is high enough to justify the “R” rating.  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 14, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on May 16, 2016; ascent of route with Cook on May 20, 2016.

302.25  Hillbilly Hoedown  5.2  Hillbilly Hoedown ascends the largest of several pinnacles located in an open area of ridgetop, 300 feet southwest (slightly uphill) from Bat Pinnacle.  The pinnacle has a distinct, 60 foot high northwest face.  The only easy way to the summit is by way of its long, low-angle southwest arete (on the uphill side of the formation).  Climb on the east side of this arete, 25 feet to the base of a slab.  The slab leads 20 more feet to the summit.  There is no protection on this route, and it is fairly exposed.  Descend by downclimbing or by a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on May 16, 2016; ascent of route with Cook on May 20, 2016.

302.31  Widow’s Peak - West Ridge  5.2  Widow’s Peak is by far the largest formation on the ridge above (west of) Cortadura Wall.  It is located 100 yards south of the group of pinnacles that contains Hillbilly Hoedown.  Widow’s Peak’s east/downhill side is 70 feet high and sits about 200 feet above the Chalone Peak Trail.  It also has large north and south faces.  Its 80 foot long, low-angle west ridge is the formation’s only obvious weakness.  Start in the gap between a large boulder and the west end of the ridge.  Move toward the summit over a series of northeast/southwest oriented sub-ridges (some fifth class).  The route crux appears after 50 feet.  Move left (northeast) on a ledge below a short but steep headwall.  Big knobs allow exposed moves over a gap (possible to lasso a very large knob here for protection).  Easier climbing then leads to a broad summit.  Descend by downclimbing, by way of a long Pinnacles rappel from the summit, or by using a shorter Pinnacles rappel from the sub-summit above the crux.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery and ascent of route with John Cook on May 20, 2016.

302.41  Hey Kid  5.8 *  This route is on the east side of a previously unclimbed formation called The Old Man.
The Old Man:  The Old Man is located 200 yards west of the Chalone Peak Trail where that trail comes closest to The Driver.  The formation is quite large, but is also hard to see from most places in the Park (it’s probably easiest to see from Kasparek’s Ridge, up above the Goal Posts).  The Old Man is a fun crag that seems to have a greater-than-average amount of good rock and solid knobs.
The Approach:  Approach The Old Man by hiking the Chalone Peak Trail up to and past the saddle near The Driver. Continue on the trail south, toward Cortadura Wall, but leave it after just 150 more feet (leave the trail about 100 feet before a solitary pinnacle that sits just above the right side of the trail, still well before Cortadura Wall).  Move right/uphill/due west through clear areas (with one or two brushy passages) to the ridge top near two tiny pinnacles.  Turn left/south (still on the ridge top) and move 50 yards to two 30 foot high pinnacles (the one farthest to the right/southwest is Bat Pinnacle). The Old Man can be seen from near these 30 foot high formations; it is 150 yards to the west (across a very shallow valley, through brush).  Move northwest, now moving slightly downhill, through clear areas and some slight brush.  Stay right/north of a solitary pine, moving into a slight drainage.  The drainage fades out in brush after 150 feet, but gaps allow a mostly brush-free passage to The Old Man’s east side.  Routes on the east side are described first, left to right, followed by climbs on other parts of the formation.
This Route:  The east side of The Old Man contains a prominent, deep chute on its left (south) side.  Hey Kid starts just outside the chute, to its left (the next two routes in order, Get Offa’ My Lawn and Glory Days start in the chute).  Climb 10 feet to a stance on top of a small fin of hard rock (a nice, two inch piece in a horizontal crack protects the last of these moves). Continue past two crux bulges (each protected by a bolt).  Join the route Get Offa’ My Lawn (listed next) at its last bolt.  These two routes then share a two-bolt summit anchor on a semi-separate summit 50 feet off the ground.  FA Party:  John Cook, Bob Walton, David Harden.  FA Date:  February 28, 2016. Source(s):  Watched the route being established.  Did the route’s second lead minutes after its first lead, February 27, 2016.

302.42  Get Offa’ My Lawn  5.6 *  This route starts on the left wall of the prominent deep chute on the left part of The Old Man’s east side (the route Glory Days climbs the clean water streak in the back of the chute).  Climb 12 feet to a bolt.  Move onto an up-and-left ramp and a second bolt 20 feet off the ground.  A third bolt protects moves over a headwall.  Two more bolts protect easier climbing to the anchor shared with Hey Kid.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Brad Young, David Harden.  FA Date:  February 21, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.51  Glory Days  5.6 ***  This steep route is fun and well protected.  Climb the water streak in the back of the deep chute on The Old Man’s east side.  Six bolts in 50 feet lead to the top of the chute.  One more bolt protects the last 20 feet of climbing, up and to the right, in a secondary water streak.  The two-bolt anchor is equipped for rappel, but it is also possible to walk/scramble off to the west and around the south side of the formation (there is a short section of class three just back from the anchor).  FA Party:  Brad Young, David Harden, Joel Primrose, Jon Cochran, Bob Walton, John Cook.  FA Date:  February 22, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.515  Coronary Bypass  5.10b **  This route starts 10 feet right of Glory Days.  Climb a shallow, steep chute past two bolts.  Move up and right to a third bolt and then around an arete to a second water streak.  Bolts four and five protect the route crux, over a bulge in this second streak.  Thin face climbing leads straight up past three more bolts (eight lead bolts total).  Finish on top of The Old Man at a two-bolt anchor, 95 feet from the start.  Walk off or move to the anchor for Glory Days to rappel back to the start. FA Party:  Brian Hamilton, Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  February 8, 2020.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on February 17, 2020.  

302.52  Talkin’ Smack  5.6  This route is located on a blunt arete 60 feet right (north) of Glory Days and just left of a low angle trough.  Three bolts protect 50 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor above a ledge (to the left).  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  March, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched Jon Cochran install first bolt; both first ascent authors later described the route after its completion; ascent of route with John Cook on April 15, 2016.

302.53  When I Was Your Age  5.10b **  Start in a low angle trough five feet right of Talkin’ Smack.  A fixed piton 30 feet up protects easy moves up-and-right to a bolt.  Move up-and-left to a stance below the crux bulge.  Six more bolts protect the bulge and then more steep, clean climbing to the formation’s summit 90 feet from the start.  A two-bolt anchor allows a descent by rappel (or walk off past the Glory Days anchor and around The Old Man’s south side).  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher, Steve Dawson, Jon Cochran, Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  April 24, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.54  Dementia  5.11b **  Dementia starts 30 feet right of When I Was Your Age, on the right side of an arete that separates both lines.  Thin 5.10 face on very good rock leads past one bolt to a stance at a fixed piton in a horizontal crack.  Six more bolts lead past the (steep) crux to easier climbing on now-excellent rock.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor on the edge of the summit 75 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Jon Cochran, Caleb Rightmeyer.  FA Date:  May 1, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched the route being established on two separate days, April 17 and 24, 2016.  Conversations and emails about the route with Emmons and Cochran after its completion.

302.58  Wheelchair Access  5.3  The Old Man’s east side has a very large, tree-filled alcove which starts 80 feet right of Glory Days.  Wheelchair Access climbs the prominent ramp/left-facing corner where the alcove’s right (north) side meets The Old Man’s east face.  Easy fifth class leads up the ramp to a crux just before its end, 50 feet up.  Fifteen more feet of class four slab lead to the top of the rock and a two-bolt anchor.  Walk off.  Gear: to three inches.  FA Party:  John and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 24, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched first ascent from the top of When I Was Your Age and then immediately did the route’s second ascent.

302.61  Back In the Day  5.2 *  The Old Man has two high points; both are 20 foot high pillars on top of the main mass of the formation.  Back In the Day ascends the north side of the south high point.  Reach the start of the route by moving along the south side of The Old Man, up-and-around to a point 50 feet past where dirt is highest on the formation’s west side.  A distinct three-foot high step of rock requires almost-technical moves.  Low angle/class two slabs then lead 50 feet to a large flat area on the west side of and between the two high points.  Back In the Day ascends the south high point’s north side; big, solid knobs lead quickly to a narrow summit.  A two-bolt anchor allows a 30 foot rappel to the west (back to the flat area).  The only protection on this climb consists of multiple slung knobs.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, John Cook.  FA Date:  February 26, 2016.  Source(s):  Description of route by Cook while standing at the base and subsequent ascent on February 27, 2016.

302.62  Not for Sissies  5.9 *  Climb the 20 foot high south side of The Old Man’s north high point.  Two closely spaced bolts protect exciting, slightly overhanging moves on big knobs.  There is a two-bolt anchor at the top.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  February 27, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.63  Yer In Trouble  5.9  This route is a bolt-protected boulder problem (it is bolt protected due to the 60 feet of exposure below its start).  A ledge leads from the south to the north side of The Old Man’s north summit.  One bolt protects a short section of steep (and loose) moves onto the summit.  Continue to the two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook.  FA Date:  February 27, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

302.93  Tastes Like Chicken  5.0  Tastes Like Chicken is one of several routes at Granny’s Kitchen, a collection of pinnacles located south/uphill from The Old Man’s uphill side.
Granny’s Kitchen:  A use-trail leads from The Old Man’s uphill (southwest) side, past and over several small rocks and slabs to the three formations that make up Granny’s Kitchen.  These formations are (from north to south) Chicken Wings Pinnacle, See Alice Pinnacle and Swayback Granny.  
Chicken Wings Pinnacle:  Chicken Wings Pinnacle is the largest formation at Granny’s Kitchen and is closest to The Old Man.  The formation has a steep, continuous west side and two distinct summits which are aligned north-south.  There are two routes on the south/uphill side of the formation.  When approaching from The Old Man, reach Chicken Wing’s north end, then stay to the right (west) moving steeply uphill to the pinnacle’s uphill (south) end.
This Route:  Tastes Like Chicken is the low-angle, 35 foot slot on the left (west) side of Chicken Wings Pinnacle’s uphill side.  The slot leads directly to the formation’s north summit.  Downclimbing this slot is the easiest way off the formation.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  April 24, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched John Cook make the first ascent and then immediately followed him to the summit.

302.94  No Spring Chicken  5.3  No Spring Chicken is also on the south side of Chicken Wings Pinnacle.  Start just right (east) from Tastes Like Chicken.  Move up a low-angle chute 20 feet to a shoulder on Chicken Wing’s east side.  Ten feet of climbing leads into a notch between the two summits.  Finish by stepping onto the (higher) north summit.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  March 18, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on March 21, 2016; solo ascent of route on April 24, 2016.

302.95  Over Easy or Scrambled  Class Four  This route is the only easy way to summit the slender ridge-like formation located 35 feet southeast of Chicken Wings Pinnacle.  Start on an eight foot high lump of rock 10 feet southeast from the start of No Spring Chicken.  There is a five inch gap between this lump and the southwest end of the main formation.  Exposed moves over this gap lead to a thin, low-angle ridge.  Follow this 25 more feet to the summit.  Although short, this route has serious exposure on its east side.  Also, there is no protection, but a belayer on the west side of the formation can effectively prevent a fall off its high, east side.  Descend by downclimbing or by a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Laura Rosensteel.  FA Date:  May 8, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook on May 16, 2016; ascent of route with John Cook on May 20, 2016.

302.96  Short Stack  5.3  Short Stack is the shorter, separate pinnacle between Over Easy or Scrambled and See Alice Pinnacle.  Start on its south side (the side facing See Alice).  A slight ramp leads 15 feet to a shoulder.  Continue 10 feet more to a stance and a bolt.  Crux moves lead to a narrow summit 30 feet from the start of the climb.  There is no top anchor.  Descend by a Pinnacles rappel to the west (it is possible to reach down and unclip the bolt before rappelling).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Laura Rosensteel.  FA Date:  May 8, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook on May 16, 2016; ascent of route with John Cook on May 20, 2016.

302.97  See Alice Pinnacle  5.7 *  See Alice Pinnacle is 85 feet southeast from the south side of Chicken Wings Pinnacle.  It is steep on its east, south and west sides, but not so steep at its north arete.  Start right of this arete, moving leftward on a ledge to a bolt.  Continue up several feet to a horizontal crack which takes small gear.  A second bolt three feet above the crack protects an awkward crux.  Move to an up-and-left crack (gear from two to four inches) and then to a third bolt that protects moves to the summit and a two-bolt anchor 50 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date:  April 17, 2016.  Source(s):  Discussion with John Cook about this and other routes the day of the first ascent; ascent of route with Mark Fletcher on April 24, 2016.

302.98  Swayback Granny  5.4 *  Swayback Granny is the next pinnacle south from See Alice Pinnacle (they’re 50 feet apart).  It is a smaller formation than See Alice Pinnacle and is easy to identify by the unique arch low on its south side.  Start the route by moving across the arch, slightly down to a bolt.  Continue up and right to an exposed ledge.  One more bolt protects crux moves to the summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Descend by way of an overhanging 25 foot rappel.  A star is given to this route due to its unique start and, up higher, surprising exposure.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  March 18, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on March 21, 2016; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons on April 24, 2016.

305.4  Formic Acid Bath  5.5  This very short route is located on the hillside above Chalone Peak Trail, beyond (south of) Cortadura Wall.  Approach by hiking the Chalone Peak Trail to a point 75 yards past Cortadura Wall.  Continue through a 100 yard long, very straight section of trail (a 15 foot high boulder on the right side of the trail 50 yards along helps identify the straight stretch).  Leave the trail just before it makes a slight leftward bend.  Move straight uphill (west) on slabs and dirt.  Formic Acid Bath is on the uphill (northwest) side of a formation that is 250 feet above the trail.  Climb the rightmost boulder of two that make up that face.  Two bolts lead 20 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  Note, this formation is 100 yards due south of Widow’s Peak and is also easy to approach from there; the summits of the two formations are at about the same elevation and a mostly brush-free passage can be made from one to the other.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  May 8, 2016.  Source(s):  Email report of route from John Cook on May 16, 2016 (who’d been told of the route by Fletcher); ascent of route on May 20, 2016.

305.63  Disposable Income  5.8  Disposable Income is located immediately below The Bachelor, a large formation near Chalone Peak Trail.
The Bachelor:  The Bachelor is the south-most large pinnacle within the huge bend where Chalone Peak Trail transitions from travelling generally southbound (past Cortadura Wall) to generally westbound (toward Rubble Wall).  It is above the trail where it is southbound, but below it where it heads west.  The Bachelor’s downhill sides are steep to overhanging, over 100 feet high, and somewhat rotten.  A jumble of shorter, but still significant bumps and spires is found just below its east/downhill side.  Approach The Bachelor, mostly brush-free, from the trail directly below.  Move uphill/west to the jumble of bumps and spires, staying to their east, and then to the east and north of the main pinnacle.
This Route:  This route climbs a shallow, east-facing water chute located in the jumble of bumps and spires below The Bachelor’s east side.  The chute is located above a grassy alcove, 250 feet from Chalone Peak Trail (the alcove is about halfway from the trail to The Bachelor’s uphill side, and about two-thirds of the way from the left side of the bumps and spires to their right side).  Five closely spaced bolts lead to and then over a bulge.  Easier climbing leads to a huge ledge.  Move left to make a belay with one bolt and a tied-off, torpedo-shaped nose of rock, 60 feet from the start.  Scramble off left south).  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 8, 2018.  Source(s):  Description of route from John Cook while hiking to its base on April 9, 2018; ascent of route minutes later.

305.64  Young and Single  5.6 R  From the west/uphill side of The Bachelor, move down to a large, fairly level, grassy alcove on its northwest side (a 15-foot high, squat, separate pinnacle makes up this alcove’s south-facing north wall).  Begin climbing on a knobby, west face at the back of the alcove (left of a 40-foot high groove where this west face joins the alcove’s north face).  Climb to a bolt 20 feet up.  This protects the route’s first crux and further climbing to a long shoulder of rock 45 feet from the start (consider using long runners over a large plate of rock on top of the shoulder to protect the follower).  From the shoulder, clip a second bolt on the north side of a subsidiary summit.  This bolt protects a second crux.  Continue to the top of the subsidiary summit and a two-bolt rappel anchor.  The anchor protects curving, exposed class four to the true summit, 90 feet from the start.  There is no anchor on the true summit, return to the subsidiary summit to rappel 50 feet back to the start of the route.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Hitch Young and Phoebe Young.  FA Date:  March 19, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

305.65  Love ‘Em and Leave ‘Em  5.7 *  Begin this route in the 40-foot high groove just right of Young and Single.  Move up-and-right and then up, past three bolts directly to the second bolt of Things Not Rings.  Finish on that route to the two-bolt anchor, 50 feet from the start.
FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 1, 2018.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud Forums “Quest for Mud (Special Edition)," April 1, 2018; ascent of route on April 9, 2018.

305.66  Things Not Rings  5.3  Start on The Bachelor’s uphill/west side.  Class two and three lead 50 feet over humps and through an almost level, low rock gully to a wide, deep slot which extends south to north across The Bachelor’s west side.  Move into the far left/north end of the deep slot, below a short, low-angle section of west face.  A bolt protects exposed moves up and left over this face.  Continue to the top of a hump and then down to a second slot below another short face and another bolt.  This bolt protects moves onto a subsidiary summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Join the route Young and Single here, continuing to the summit and then returning to the anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  March 25, 2018.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud Forums “Quest for Mud (Special Edition)," March 25, 2018; ascent of route on April 9, 2018.

305.72  Tick Talk  5.4  Tick Talk is one of several routes located in one of the most remote climbing areas at Pinnacles, The New World.
The New World:  The New World consists of a separate, shallow, pinnacle-filled valley located south and east of a huge curve in the Chalone Peak Trail, well past Cortadura Wall but still well north of North Chalone Peak.  The area is due south from Rubble Wall, but is on the other side of a ridge from that formation (the two are on opposite sides of the Chalone Peak Trail too).  The New World can’t be seen from the Chalone Peak Trail or from any other climbing area in the park.  Here’s a place where solitude and beauty are guaranteed.
Approaching The New World:  It is a two mile, brush-free hike from Bear Gulch parking to The New World.  
The Trail Portion of the Approach:  Walk past the reservoir to the Chalone Peak Trail and hike that to the saddle on Kasparek’s Ridge (near The Driver).  Continue south on the trail toward North Chalone Peak.  Pass the exit point to The Old Man, pass Cortadura Wall, and pass the exit point for the route Formic Acid Bath.  Reach a very sharp right switchback followed two hundred yards later by two 25 to 30 foot high rock formations just off the right side of the trail.  Two more sharp switchbacks (left and then right) follow.  Look for a series of three evenly-spaced, man-made rock steps across the trail 250 feet past the last switchback.  Continue about 200 yards past the steps before exiting the trail to the left (uphill/southwest).  
The Cross Country Portion of the Approach:  It is about one quarter mile from the Chalone Peak Trail to the climbing routes in The New World.  Although the hiking is up then down and then up again, it is brush-free. Leave Chalone Peak Trail to the left, moving through brush-free areas, straight up, then up and left, then straight up again.  A six to ten-foot high, east-facing rock bluff comes into sight at a point 100 yards from the trail. Walk south along the top of this bluff for almost 100 yards (passing a very visible U.S.G.S. marker on a short pole).  The rock and pinnacles of The New World start to come into view near the end of the bluff.  Seen from this perspective are, from right/uphill to left/downhill: a large, slabby mass of rock, Top Knot and Tick Talk pinnacles (together appearing from this point as a large jumbled rock mass), Behemoth (a significant free standing spire), Goliath (identifiable as a separate formation, but smaller than Behemoth and behind it to the left), The Glob (a large but lower-angle formation; its summit is lower than Quadruple Decker’s), Quadruple Decker (another significant, separate pinnacle), and The Flask (the biggest and lowest formation on the south side of the main west-to-east drainage).
Finding Tick Talk:  After sighting the climbing formations, move downhill through clear areas 400 feet, passing to the right (uphill) of multiple 10 to 25 foot high pinnacles.  Cross a slight north-to-south drainage and move a short way uphill to and into a wide slot between the large, slabby mass of rock (on the right) and the large mass of Top Knot Pinnacle (on the left).  Finish up the slot to a nice flat staging area that serves the climbs on Tick Talk and Top Knot.  Tick Talk is on the south side of this staging area and Top Knot is to the east (the two formations’ summits are 100 feet apart).  
This Climbing Route:  Start on the north/uphill side of the formation.  Move over a four foot high overhang into a short chute.  Continue onto a shoulder 15 feet up.  A bolt protects another 20 feet of climbing from the shoulder to the summit.  Use the one-bolt summit anchor to back up a body position belay.  Use it also as a safety point to descend using a Pinnacles rappel (run the rope through the chain so it can’t roll off the top).  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 13, 2017.  Source(s):  Route list/descriptions provided by John Cook, autumn 2017; ascent of route with Jennifer Wang, February 19, 2018.                                                                                                                              
305.73  Top Knot  5.3 R  An unusual, mountaineering-type climb to the top of a short but exposed, separate spire protruding from the mass of a larger formation.  
Finding Top Knot:  Top Knot pinnacle is due east of the staging area that serves it and Tick Talk.  From that point it is easy to see the short, separate spire that is this route’s end point.  
Climbing Top Knot:  Two small, low summits must be passed to gain access to a slot on the separate spire’s north side.  Belay at a fixed piton on the west side of the first low summit (the piton is about 50 feet northeast of the route Tick Talk).  Move east, over the initial low summit and then down 15 feet to a shallow slot.  Climb to the next summit and a bolt.  Downclimb a low angle slab for 20 feet to reach a short, crumbly pillar located in a slot between the separate spire and the main bulk of the formation.  Climb to the top of the crumbly pillar and then onto a shoulder below the spire.  A two-bolt anchor protects moves onto the spire’s summit.  To descend, rappel back to the base of the crumbly pillar and reverse the route.  As a further note: to understand the formation’s name, view it from a grassy area just above/northwest of Behemoth.  From there, looking northeast, the short, separate spire looks quite like a girl looking to the right, her hair’s top knot clearly visible.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 27, 2017.  Source(s):  Route list/descriptions provided by John Cook, autumn 2017; ascent of route with Jennifer Wang, February 19, 2018.

305.75  Behemoth  5.7 R  Behemoth is one of the larger formations in The New World.  It is due south of Tick Talk (the two formations’ summits are 150 feet apart).  Approach Behemoth from the staging area on the north side of Tick Talk.  Move around Tick Talk’s uphill (northwest) side and then down to a grassy area on Behemoth’s uphill (west) side.  From the grassy area, move to the west/uphill end of the Behemoth formation’s north face (two smaller pinnacles sit against Behemoth’s northwest side).  Move east from a large pine, along a ledge system and over the tops of boulders, 60 feet to the start of the climb, an obvious up-and-right slot/chimney. Two bolts protect the chimney (the route crux).  A lower angle section above leads to a high shoulder/pedestal below a slab.  Move slightly down and then onto the slab, continuing to the summit 75 feet from the start.  A two-bolt anchor on the summit allows an airy, 55 foot rappel back to the start of the climb.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  June 4, 2017.  Source(s):  Route list/descriptions provided by John Cook, autumn 2017; ascent of route with Jennifer Wang, February 19, 2018.

305.76  Goliath  5.6 *  Goliath is the next pinnacle downhill/southwest from Behemoth.  Goliath is above The Glob and has a much higher summit.  Much of Goliath’s north side is undercut at about two-thirds height.  Start climbing at an up-and-left ramp located in the center of that north side.  This leads 35 feet past a class four gap to a flat area on Goliath’s northeast shoulder.  Move over a five foot wall onto a ledge, now on the pinnacle’s east side.  One bolt above this ledge protects exposed moves up and left.  The climbing then eases off, becoming class four in the last 15 feet to the summit.  The route curves significantly in the 85 feet from start to finish.  A two-bolt anchor on top allows a 50 foot rappel directly back to the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jim McConachie, John Cook, Joel Primrose.  FA Date:  March 8, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.  

305.77  The Glob  Class Four The Glob is a large but relatively low pinnacle located just uphill (northwest) of Quadruple Decker and downhill from Goliath.  Climb a ten-foot high slab on the right side of the formation’s north face.  Continue, class two, 40 more feet to the summit.  To descend, downclimb the route.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 19, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

305.79  Quadruple Decker  5.8 *  Quadruple Decker is the lowest/south-most pinnacle of those located north of The New World’s main west-to-east drainage.  It is directly across that drainage from The Flask (described below).  The formation can be readily identified from near The Flask, where all four of its “layers” are easy to see.  The climbing route’s first pitch ascends the lowest up-and-right ramp on the formation’s south side.  Three bolts in 70 feet lead to a large, perched ledge and a two-bolt belay (5.6).  The second pitch starts with the route crux and continues past three bolts and lots of wonderful holes in 50 feet.  There are three bolts on the summit, one for a directional and two that allow an 80 foot rappel directly back to the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Jim McConachie.  FA Date:  March 9, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

305.82  Uncorked  5.8 *  Uncorked is located on a separate formation called The Flask.
The Flask:  The Flask is the only large formation in The New World that is on the south side of the shallow valley’s main west-to-east drainage.  It is directly across that creek (due south) from Quadruple Decker.  To approach The Flask, move into the brush-free drainage just east of Top Knot and Behemoth.  This drainage flows south, into the main west-to-east drainage.  Cross the west-to-east drainage, then move up slope 100 feet to the northeast base of the formation.
Uncorked:  Start left of center on the formation’s east face.  Move over an easy bulge into a wide water chute to the first bolt 15 feet up.  Continue up and right past three more bolts and the route’s first crux.  The fifth bolt is in the back of a shallow bowl.  Easy climbing leads right to an arete and a sixth bolt, which protects the exposed second crux.  There is a two-bolt anchor on the summit, 65 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  May 26, 2017.  Source(s):  Route list/descriptions provided by John Cook, autumn 2017; ascent of route with Jennifer Wang, February 19, 2018.

305.83  The Flask - Back Side  5.2 R  Start on the south/uphill side of The Flask, below two rock masses that are connected to, but left of and shorter than, the formation’s summit.  Move up a low-angle slot between these two masses, ending 25 feet from the start, on top of the middle mass, below the overhanging west face of The Flask’s high point.  Climb the right side of the overhanging face, continuing ten more feet to the formation’s summit anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 19, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

310.2  Hammer in My Heart  5.4 *  Hammer in My Heart is the first of six new routes at Rubble Wall.  All six are northeast and east of the ridge on which the three Teeth are located.  These six routes use a different approach than the five that appear in the 2007 book (they are approached from around the wall’s east side).  They are listed here in the order in which they appear when approaching them that way.
Heart of Pinnacles:  It is possible that the word “obvious” is over-used in climbing route descriptions.  Over-used or not, it applies to the separate, small formation called “Heart of Pinnacles” on which this route is located.  Heart of Pinnacles is a ridge of rock that is oriented from southeast (uphill) to northwest (downhill).  It parallels the larger ridge on which are The Teeth at Rubble Wall (Heart of Pinnacles is about 80 feet north of the larger ridge).  The standout feature of this formation is a slightly rotated, heart-shaped hole about midway down its length.  If the word obvious is used too frequently in descriptions, perhaps the phrase that applies here is “you’ll absolutely know it when you see it.”
Approaching Heart of Pinnacles:  To get to Hammer in My Heart, use the Rubble Wall approach directions and map from the 2007 guidebook.  Once through most of the open/meadow area, move north to and then around the east-most section of north-facing cliff.  Skirt the cliff (short sections of class three) until emerging onto grassy slopes directly above Heart of Pinnacles.
Hammer in My Heart:  Start climbing on the right side of the downhill/northwest end of the ridge.  Easy climbing on big knobs leads 30 feet to two huge lodestones below a short, overhanging notch.  One bolt protects this notch.  Continue along the top of the ridge to its uphill/southeast end (where the ridge meets the hillside), 90 feet from the start.  Use slung horns to make a belay.  The climbing on Hammer in My Heart is of average quality; the route gets a star for the formation’s unique character.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 29, 2017.  Source(s):  Report of route by John Cook on Mud’nCrud thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” February 9, 2018; ascent of route with Hitch and Phoebe Young, March 19, 2018.  [In.]

310.3  Molar  5.3  Molar is a slightly separate pinnacle located uphill/southeast of Heart of Pinnacles’ uphill end (Molar is separated from the adjacent cliff by a very narrow gap).  Start in the shallow corridor between Molar and the cliff.  Climb a clean, featured face 25 feet to where it is possible to stem across onto Molar (multiple slung horn/edges here).  Commit onto Molar, continuing to a two-bolt anchor and then a short distance more to its summit.  Descend by a 35 foot rappel to the start of the climb.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  February 10, 2018.  Source(s):  Report of route by John Cook on Mud’nCrud thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” February 12, 2018; ascent of route with Hitch and Phoebe Young, March 19, 2018.

310.4. Pebbles and Bam Bam  5.8 *  Pebbles and Bam Bam and its sister route Betty and Barney are located on the northeast side of the rock ridge on which the Teeth are located.  Approach them from the downhill/northwest end of Heart of Pinnacles by moving 100 feet downhill/west to the base of a north-facing sub-section of the ridge (because both routes face north, they can’t quite be seen from the downhill end of Heart of Pinnacles).  Look for a mix of large and huge knobs among twin, faint, mossy water streaks.  Pebbles and Bam Bam starts on the right side of the left streak.  Climb past three bolts before moving left and then up past two more bolts.  Crux moves lead up and right, out of the streak.  Finish with 15 feet of easy movement to a two-bolt anchor 65 feet from the start (note the unique rock below the anchor: “The Recliner”).  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  November 19, 2017.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition)," February 6, 2018; ascent of route with John Cook, April 10, 2018.

310.5  Betty and Barney  5.6 *  Betty and Barney starts in the right faint, mossy water streak 12 feet right of Pebbles and Bam Bam.  Big holds lead to the first bolt and then a large, slingable lodestone.  Stem past a second bolt to a steep exit.  Continue back 20 feet to a two-bolt anchor shared with Pebbles and Bam Bam.  FA Party:  John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  February 4, 2018.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition)," February 6, 2018; ascent of route with John Cook, April 10, 2018.

310.6.  Tooth Fairy  5.2 R  Climb a lower-angle, knobby face starting 15 feet right of Betty and Barney.  Move up and right and then up 50 feet to a point directly below the Middle Tooth/West Tooth notch.  Move right 15 feet to end at the two-bolt, first pitch anchor of Long in the Tooth (listed next).  Pro: many slung knobs and one 1½ inch piece (used right before the finishing traverse).  FA Party:  John Cook and Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  April 2, 2017.  Source(s):  Report of route from first ascentionist John Cook on April 10, 2018; ascent of route minutes later.

310.7  Long in the Tooth  5.8 **  This route climbs the northwest end of the ridge on which the Teeth are located.  Start 50 feet down and around (right/northwest) from Tooth Fairy.  Climb straight up past three bolts (5.7) before moving left toward a huge lodestone (sling this with a large-diameter runner).  Easier climbing then leads to a huge ledge and a two-bolt anchor, 75 feet from the start.  Start the second pitch by moving up and right to a stance.  Climb the steep face above, past three closely spaced bolts (5.8 on good rock).  An easy runout then leads to a fourth bolt right under a two-bolt anchor which is just below the summit of West Tooth.  A wildly exposed, 40 foot rappel leads directly to the first pitch anchor.  FA Party: John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  November 8, 2017.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition)," February 6, 2018; ascent of route with John Cook, April 10, 2018.

312.3 Skywalk  5.6 R  This route is on South Ridge Rock, the next pinnacle to the south of Ridge Rock (both formations are shown on the map on page 126 of the 2007 guidebook; the trail to Gertie's Pinnacle passes between the two). Climb the rock's slender north arete (the end nearest to Ridge Rock). Start behind a manzanita, in a shallow chute which leads to a low shoulder on the formation's east side. The chute leads to one bolt 30 feet up, which protects crux moves onto the arete. The climbing eases after the crux; reach the summit after 60 feet, but continue way back to use a large manzanita as a belay anchor. Walk off to the south. FA Party: Josh Mucci and Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  April, 2012.  Source(s):  Discussions about route with Mucci and Behrens; ascent of route with Tricia Young, March 16, 2014.

312.4  Sling the Jockstone  5.11b  This route is located on South Ridge Rock’s west face, 50 feet right (south) from Skywalk.  Start at the top of a class two slab.  Four bolts lead over a bulge onto easier but run-out climbing.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor 50 feet from the start.  The crux on this route (getting past the first bolt) is particularly reachy.  Walk off right (south).  FA Party: Brian Hamilton, Brad Young,Josh Mucci, Robert Behrens, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date: December 30, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

322.141  Endeavor to Persevere  5.7 *  Endeavor to Persevere is one of two routes on the north side of Crocodile Crag.
Crocodile Crag:  Crocodile Crag is a large, multi-summited massif located 200 feet east of Gertie’s Pinnacle.  The formation’s west/uphill side (the side toward Gertie’s) is noticeable, but not very high.  It is easy to scramble onto the crag’s main/highest summits from this side.  The crag’s east and north faces are tall and are both readily visible from Chalone Peak Trail.  The east face is steep-to-overhanging and mostly rotten.  The north side faces directly at The Sisters; it is tall, lower-angle, and divided by gullies and water grooves into semi-separate buttresses.  Previously, the only route on Crocodile Crag was Old Route, which is located on a separate sub-pinnacle on the formation’s northwest edge.
Endeavor to Persevere:  Reach the start of this route by moving around Crocodile Crag’s northwest side (significant brush and a class three gully) or by walking around to the south (twice as long, but no class three and little brush).  Reach a group of four spire-like boulders (the tallest is 20 feet high on its downhill side).  Look for a thin, mossy water chute on Crocodile Crag’s north face, behind these boulders.  Climb the chute to the route’s first bolt 15 feet up.  Stay left of the chute past three more bolts to a noticeable headwall, a fifth bolt, and the route’s well-protected crux.  A sixth bolt protects another headwall 20 feet higher.  Continue past two more bolts (eight total) to a two-bolt anchor on a sub-summit 103 feet from the start.  Descend by rappel or by class two and three to the southwest and then around to the base.  FA Party:  John Cook, Brad Young, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  May 10, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

322.142  Whistlin’ Dixie  5.7 *  A sister route to Endeavor to Persevere.  Climb past that route’s first three bolts before moving up and right into an alcove that is part of the thin, mossy water chute.  A bolt high on the right side of the alcove protects moves up and right.  Three more bolts (seven lead bolts total) protect additional climbing to a large ledge and a two-bolt anchor 95 feet from the start.  Walk off right and then around or climb 20 feet left (class four) to rappel from the Endeavor to Persevere anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 11, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

322.41  Squatter’s Rights  5.4  Squatter’s Rights is located on Pioneer Pinnacle, a relatively small formation that is 100 yards north of Crud and Mud.  Perceptions of poor rock and a nasty approach have deterred climbers from the Crud and Mud area for years.  It turns out though that there is good rock at Crud and Mud (and of course some bad rock too).  And the approach is much, much easier than previously thought.  Descriptions of the new routes in this area start with an updated approach description.  Pioneer Pinnacle is then described followed by new routes on Crud and Mud itself.
Approach to This Area:  When done properly, the walk to Crud and Mud is surprisingly easy.  Walk the Chalone Peak Trail to near The Sisters before exiting onto the climber-use trail that traverses the reservoir’s south side (as if making the approach to The Hand or other formations beyond the reservoir).  Stay on this trail to the up-stream end of the reservoir.  Where the normal trail to formations beyond moves down to cross the stream, continue levelly 75 more feet.  A slight use-trail then leads uphill, weaving through brush-free passages.  After 200 yards this path emerges into a large clear area on a ridgetop.  This clear area is 50 feet east of Pioneer Pinnacle.  Move through this area, toward Crud and Mud before circling around to Pioneer Pinnacle’s south side.  
Pioneer Pinnacle:  This formation is 25 feet high on its uphill/south side and 45 feet high on the north.  It has a broad summit that provides surprisingly nice views of the whole area.  There is a much smaller, sharper spire 20 feet to its east.  Since the approach to Pioneer leads to its south side (at the route Squatter’s Rights), route descriptions start there and continue to the right around the formation (from the south, to the east, north and then west).
This Route:  Squatter’s Rights climbs the 25 foot high, uphill (south) side of Pioneer Pinnacle.  There is a distinct and exposed crux about halfway up.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor above Cha-Sam (listed next).  Descend by downclimbing or by moving over to the Prairie Falcon anchor to rappel.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on May 16, 2016; solo ascent of route on May 21, 2016.

322.42  Cha-Sam  5.9  This short, steep route starts 20 feet right of Squatter’s Rights, on the left side of Pioneer Pinnacle’s east face.  Three bolts lead to the top and a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Sam Steuart, Chandler Richards, John Cook, Brad Young.  FA Date:  October 29, 2016.  Source(s):  John Cook and Brad Young assisted the first ascent from beginning to end and discussed the name and rating with the two route authors; ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville, Mathew Hopper, Ian Derrington on February 12, 2017.

322.43  Imprint 5.8 *  Imprint is on the east face of Pioneer Pinnacle.  It is toward the north/downhill side of the face, forty feet right from Squatter’s Rights.  Start immediately right of an unusually flat, blank, vertical slab.  Two bolts protect 35 feet of fun climbing up a knobby face to the Prairie Falcon anchor.  FA Party: John Cook, Jon Cochran. FA Date: September 14, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016; ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville, Mathew Hopper, Ian Derrington on February 12, 2017.

322.44  Prairie Falcon 5.7 *  Prairie Falcon climbs the north (downhill) end of Pioneer Pinnacle.  From Pioneer’s lowest toe, move up 15 feet to a bolt.  Move up and left to a second bolt.  Easier moves gain a rounded arete and a third bolt.  Continue to the summit and a two-bolt anchor 50 feet from the start.  FA Party: John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook. FA Date: July 17, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016; ascent of route October 29, 2016.

322.45  Fledgling 5.7  Fledgling climbs the uphill/right side of Pioneer Pinnacle’s west face (start thirty feet left of Squatter’s Rights).  Bouldery moves lead to a stance and the route’s only bolt).  Easier climbing leads to the summit (there are several slingable knobs above the bolt). FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  September 14, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016; ascent of route October 29, 2016.

322.46  Sod Buster  5.2  This short route starts 10 feet left of Squatter’s Rights.  Climb past knobs where a short headwall meets a less-than-vertical face.  A slung knob provides the only protection.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  October 28, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 30, 2018, describing this and other routes; solo ascent of route on November 13, 2018.

325.211  Squeaky Clean Mud  5.6 **   As described below, Squeaky Clean Mud is on the northwest side of Crud and Mud’s middle summit (it starts between Crud and Mud’s north and middle summits).
Approach to This Area:  When done properly, the walk to Crud and Mud is surprisingly easy.  Walk the Chalone Peak Trail to near The Sisters before exiting onto the climber-use trail that traverses the reservoir’s south side (as if making the approach to The Hand or other formations beyond the reservoir).  Stay on this trail to the up-stream end of the reservoir.  Where the normal trail to formations beyond moves down to cross the stream, continue levelly 75 more feet.  A slight use-trail then leads uphill, weaving through brush-free passages.  After 200 yards this path emerges into a large clear area on a ridgetop.  This clear area is 50 feet east of Pioneer Pinnacle.  Move through this area, toward Crud and Mud before circling around to Pioneer Pinnacle’s south side.  From this side of Pioneer, a 100 yard long, brush-free, and slightly uphill walk leads to the lowest point of Crud and Mud (on its north side; the side facing the reservoir).
Crud and Mud:  Crud and Mud has a series of summits, each separated by noticeable gullies which reach the ground.  The summits are aligned from northeast (lowest) to southwest (highest).  For ease of reference these summits are called “north,” “middle,” and “south.”  The older routes Solotero Pina Especial and Light and Shade are on the north summit’s northeast face and are somewhat visible from Pioneer Pinnacle (Solotero Pina Especial is behind a pine tree).  Other routes are described moving rightward (southwest) from there along the northwest side of the formation and continuing around to the southwest and south side of the formation (and the routes Just Chute Me and Crud and Mud - East Side).
This Route:  Squeaky Clean Mud starts in the gully between Crud and Mud’s north and middle summits (move up from just left of the route Bathing Beauty; this is the same gully that is used to descend Solotero Pina Especial).  Look for a clean water chute on the right, about 10 feet below the top of the gully.  Five bolts protect the chute, which starts out steep before easing somewhat after the third bolt.  From the fifth bolt, traverse right and then move up to a two-bolt anchor (which is about 20 feet above the Bathing Beauty anchor).  Descend by moving down to the Bathing Beauty anchor and rappelling from that.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date: September 17, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; watched and spoke to several parties who climbed the route on October 23, 2016.

325.212  Pay Dirt  5.7 ***  Pay Dirt starts 20 feet down and right from Squeaky Clean Mud.  Six bolts protect wonderfully featured and very solid rock straight up to a two-bolt anchor (this anchor is eight feet left/up from the Mud Bath anchor; use the Mud Bath anchor as a common rappel point for this and other routes that end nearby).  FA Party:  Jeremy Hadland, John Cook, Jon Cochran, King Humann.  FA Date:  April 29, 2017.  Source(s):  Description of route by John Cook and Jon Cochran hours after it was established; ascent of route with Kathy Cook on April 30, 2017.

325.213  Mud Bath  5.8 **  This eight bolt, 75 foot route starts 15 feet up and left from Bathing Beauty (which is the first Crud and Mud route reached when approaching by way of the normal use-trail from Pioneer Pinnacle).  The route’s crux is in the first 15 feet.  Consistently 5.6 and 5.7 sections follow to a two-bolt anchor shared with Bathing Beauty.  The rock on this climb is uniformly good to excellent.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jon Cochran, Scott Coughlin.  FA Date:  March 18, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

325.214  Bathing Beauty  5.9 **  Bathing Beauty starts 150 feet right of Solotero Pina Especial at  the lowest/left-most point of the middle summit (the rotten, overhanging northwest face of Crud and Mud’s north summit takes up most of the space between these two routes).  Start on a 20 foot high, steep section of rock protected by two bolts (this section includes the route’s short crux).  Good rock leads to a blunt arete on the right.  Move around this arete before continuing straight up to a two-bolt anchor 80 feet from the ground.  There are seven lead bolts total.  Unfortunately, the rock quality on this route diminishes on the right side of the arete.  Descend by rappel.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Brad Young.  FA Date:  May 21, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

325.216  Call of the Crud  5.5  Call of the Crud starts 45 feet right of Bathing Beauty (it starts at the same place as the three routes listed next in order).  An obvious up-and-left ramp leads 25 feet to a bolt.  Two more bolts protect climbing to and then along the left side of a low-angle chute.  Move into the chute, pass a fourth bolt (now 10 feet right of Bathing Beauty), finishing at a two-bolt anchor just right of the top of the chute (note that this route’s anchor cannot be seen from below).  Descend by moving left 15 feet to the Bathing Beauty anchor; rappel from that.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  August 19, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; ascent of route with Alacia Welch, October 23, 2016.

325.231  Top of the Mudding  5.9 (TR)  This toprope route climbs the steep, clean face six feet left of Here’s Mud in Your Eye.  A single bolt just above the lip of the cliff serves as a directional.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  June 19, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; watched and spoke to several parties who climbed the route on October 23, 2016; ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville, Mathew Hopper, Ian Derrington on February 12, 2017.

325.232  Here’s Mud in Your Eye  5.8 **  This reachy, fun route starts about 45 feet right of Bathing Beauty.  A low angle, mossy ramp leads to steep, clean rock and the first bolt 25 feet up.  Three more bolts protect steep and sustained climbing to the top of the cliff.  Lower angle climbing leads to a two-bolt anchor 70 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  June 12, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016 (and discussions with the several people who were climbing it that day); ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville, Mathew Hopper, Ian Derrington on February 12, 2017.

325.233  Mudster’s Ball  5.7 *  Start 10 feet right of Here’s Mud in Your Eye.  Climb a mossy slab to the top of a pedestal (there’s good rock under the moss).  Committing moves from the top of the pedestal lead to the first bolt, 30 feet from the ground (sling multiple knobs to protect these moves).  Continue up and slightly right onto a huge lodestone (the Mudster’s “ball”) and another bolt.  Finish at the anchor shared with Here’s Mud in Your Eye.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 1, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016 (and discussions with several people while they were climbing it that day); ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville on February 12, 2017.

325.31  Hollywood Stars  5.7  Start in a water streak 50 feet right of Mudster’s Ball (slightly uphill).  The first 15 feet of the route is the obvious crux (protected by one bolt).  Ten more feet of very easy climbing follow to a point where this route joins Access Hollywood (listed next), staying in the left chute with that route (past its second bolt) and ending at its anchor 60 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  October 22, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

325.32  Access Hollywood  5.0  Access Hollywood provides easy access to the multiple top anchors for the routes Squeaky Clean Mud through Mudster’s Ball (all of which start to the left of this route).  Start this route by starting Summer of Mud (listed next).  After 12 feet begin traversing left (class three).  Stay just above tree branches, continuing horizontally 35 feet to a bolt.  Move down and left across the wide, very low-angle, right branch of a water chute and into the steeper left branch.  One more bolt protects the crux of the route up this chute to a two-bolt anchor on the right wall, 80 feet from the start.  Rappel 60 feet to the ground.  The anchor for this route is 10 feet from the Here’s Mud in Your Eye anchor.  Other routes’ top anchors can also be accessed from here by way of class two and three, up and to the northeast.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  September 16, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 9, 2017; ascent of route with multiple partners, October 22, 2017.

325.33  Summer of Mud  5.1  An easy route with good length, the possibility of introducing beginners to multi-pitch climbing, and a nice ending summit.  Start in the middle of a tall, wide slab 100 feet right/uphill of Here’s Mud in Your Eye (still left from the high point of dirt on this side of Crud and Mud).  Move straight up 35 feet to the first bolt (it can be seen from the ground).  Continue up and left toward a faint water chute, 35 more feet to a second bolt (which cannot be seen until a climber is almost on it).  Continue into the chute before moving up 20 feet to a two-bolt midway anchor.  The route continues up the chute, 25 feet to a bolt on the right wall.  Move left and up, out of the chute and onto an exposed, narrow face.  Climb to a scoop at the base of a short headwall and the route’s last bolt.  Finish up and right at the one-bolt Shoo Fly Slab anchor, 150 feet from the start of the route (supplement this one bolt with slings around (solid) flakes, and body position).  Descend as for Shoo Fly Slab.  This route can be led as one 150 foot pitch, but runner every bolt to avoid rope drag.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  August 14, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; ascent of route on October 23, 2016, with John Cook.

325.34  It’s 4:20 Dude  5.5 *  Start as for Summer of Mud but after that route’s first bolt, continue up and slightly right past two more bolts to a 10 foot high headwall (the route crux).  From the top of the headwall, move up and slightly left past two more bolts (five bolts total) to a stance on top of a huge lodestone and a two-bolt anchor 95 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  September 16, 2017. Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 9, 2017; ascent of route with multiple partners, October 22, 2017.

325.36  Shoo Fly Slab  5.5 *  Shoo Fly Slab ascends the northwest side of Crud and Mud’s middle summit, starting 35 feet right of Summer of Mud (it starts just right of the high point of dirt on this side of Crud and Mud).  An easy to see first bolt is 15 feet up.  Move up and right past this bolt, over large, rectangular, white lodestones to a second bolt.  Two more widely spaced bolts (four bolts total) protect the remainder of the easy slab to the summit 135 feet from the route’s start.  There is a one bolt summit anchor; back this up with body position and with slings over (solid) flakes.  Descend using a two-bolt anchor that is visible down and toward the south summit, 45 feet from the end of the climb.  Reach it by scrambling down a low-angle water groove (southwest) 40 feet to a grassy slot.  Move left (east) into an obvious notch.  A 40 foot rappel reaches the gully between Crud and Mud’s middle and south summits.  Scramble down west to the ground.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, John Cook.  FA Date:  May 15, 2016.  Source(s):  Examined route from base with the first ascent party as they described it, May 21, 2016.  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville on February 12, 2017.

325.37  Mud, Sweat and Veers  5.0  Mud, Sweat and Veers is located in the corridor between Crud and Mud’s middle and south summits.  It climbs an easy-to-see, low-angle water chute on middle summit’s southwest corner, about 20 feet or so into the corridor (Mud, Sweat and Veers is directly across that corridor from Mud Diamond, which is listed below).  Easy climbing in the chute leads to a headwall and the route’s first bolt.  Continue in the chute to a point below a tree before moving up-and-left to a second bolt.  Climb straight up (staying left of the tree).  Prominent knobs then allow an easy traverse right back to the water streak, 110 feet from the start.  Belay here using body position, or move 35 feet east to the easily-visible, intermediate, two-bolt anchor of the route Bottoms Up (listed next).  Descend by rappelling from that Bottoms Up intermediate anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  June 3, 2018.  Source(s):  Emails from John Cook on June 4 and June 8, 2018; ascent of route with Kathy Cook on November 13, 2018.

325.38  Bottoms Up  5.7 *  This route starts near the top of the gully between Crud and Mud’s middle and south summits.  Two bolts and slung knobs protect climbing up and left and then up to a notch.  There is a two-bolt anchor in the notch which serves as a rappel point for routes (such as Shoo Fly Slab) that finish on top of Crud and Mud’s middle summit.  Bottoms Up continues past this “intermediate” anchor to the top of a separate spire and a second two-bolt anchor directly above.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 21, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook on May 23, 2016; additional Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016; ascent of route with Marc Siddens, Sean Neville on February 12, 2017.

325.39  Pie in the Sky  Class Four  Pie in the Sky climbs the southeast-most sub-summit of Crud and Mud’s middle formation.  Start 15 feet southeast (downhill) from the highest point in the corridor between the middle and south summits.  Climb over a mound of rock and then into a notch between the main part of middle summit and the lower-elevation, separate sub-summit.  Finish on the sub-summit, 60 feet from the start (note the odd, pie-shaped knob down to the southeast of this high point).  Descend by downclimbing to the notch and then walking a short distance north and then around to the intermediate Bottoms Up two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 29, 2018.  Source(s):  Post to Mud’nCrud forum thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” by John Cook on October 30, 2018; solo ascent of route on November 13, 2018.

325.51  Ashes the Mud and I  5.5 **  A fun beginner’s route with good length.  Start in the gully between Crud and Mud’s middle and south summits (across and about 20 feet uphill from Bottoms Up).  Five bolts protect fun climbing on excellent rock, up and over a bulge.  After the bulge, join the Crud and Mud - East Side route for its last 30 feet to a two-bolt anchor. Note that Crud and Mud - East Side is route #323 in the 2007 guidebook, but it isn’t described correctly there; for correct information about this route, see the Mud’nCrud discussion forum’s Pinnacles section thread:  “Author’s official corrections to the new guidebook,” correction number 35.  This link leads to that thread: http://www.mudncrud.com/forums/index.php?topic=1599.0http://www.mudncrud.com/forums/index.php?topic=1599.0
FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  August 27, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016, and discussions with Steve, Laura and Alex Dawson, who had climbed the route minutes before; ascent of route with Jon Cochran on March 18, 2017.

325.52  Mud Brother  5.7 **  This steep route climbs fun knobs on great rock, starting 40 feet right of Ashes the Mud and I.  Five bolts in a slight water chute lead to a two-bolt anchor, 55 feet from the start.  A 45 foot rappel leads directly back to the highest point in the middle/south corridor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook, Dave Stahl.  FA Date:  June 16, 2018.  Source(s): Post to Mud’nCrud forum thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” by John Cook on June 17, 2018; ascent of route with Kathy Cook on November 13, 2018.

325.54  Mud Diamond 5.7 ***  Mud Diamond is located on the northwest side of Crud and Mud’s south summit (it starts just outside the gully that separates that summit from the middle summit).  Climb mossy but excellent rock 15 feet to the first bolt. Five more bolts lead to and over an unlikely-looking bulge, to a two-bolt anchor 80 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, John Cook.  FA Date:  August 6, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; inspection of route from the base on October 23, 2016, and discussions with Steve, Laura and Alex Dawson, who had climbed the route minutes before.

325.55  The Walking Mud  Class Four This route provides an easy way to summit Crud and Mud from the Mud Diamond top anchor.  Move up and left from that anchor toward a hard-to-see bolt, 20 feet away.  A series of small scoops then lead up and over a lip (multiple possible sling knobs).  The angle eases above the lip.  Continue 75 feet to the true summit of Crud and Mud (115 feet from the start).  There is no summit anchor for this route but a good belay can be made using body position.  Descend by way of a short downclimb to a broad shoulder of rock and the rappel anchor for the route East Side.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 22, 2017.  Source(s):  Watched the Cooks do the first ascent; ascent with Brian Hamilton 20 minutes later.

325.63  Just Chute Me 5.6 *  This well-protected route climbs the south summit's east face.  Approach by walking around the south/uphill end of Crud and Mud to a brush-free flat area at the base of the south summit’s east side.  Look for the middle of three short, shallow chutes.  Twenty feet of class three leads to a depression at the base of the chute (a good place to belay).   Easy but committing moves lead up into a concave area below a bulge and the first bolt.  Moves over the bulge are protected by a second bolt.  Finish up the chute past two more bolts to the Crud and Mud south summit anchor, 50 feet from the depression.  FA Party: John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  August 6, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 3, 2016; ascent of route with Kathy Cook on October 29, 2016.  Note also that the 2007 guidebook describes what is now this route, Just Chute Me, as route number 323, Crud and Mud - East Side.  The book is mistaken.  The route Crud and Mud - East Side is actually to the right of Just Chute Me.  Details about this error and about the true location of Crud and Mud - East Side are found on the Mud’nCrud discussion forum, in the Pinnacles section, under the title “Author’s official corrections to the new guidebook,” correction number 35.  This link leads to the thread:   http://www.mudncrud.com/forums/index.php?topic=1599.0

335.4  Escargot  5.10d  Escargot climbs partway up the west side of The Snail (the side facing The Hand).  Start over a low roof/overlap into a shallow, left-facing corner.  Sections of crack take gear to 1¼ inches.  A bolt 20 feet up leads to a fixed piton.  Continue past four more bolts, staying left of a larger, left-facing corner, and then curving left with it as it becomes a headwall. Finish at a two-bolt anchor, 60 feet from the start.
Note:  To date, Escargot has the longest time-span between the dates it was started and finished:  Jim and Jon McConachie started it in 1985, Jim then worked on the route on four other occasions over 34 years and it was finally completed in 2019.  FA Party:  Jim McConachie, Gavin Emmons, Bill McConachie, Brad Young, Jon McConachie, John Cook.  FA Date:  January 19, 2019.  Source(s):   Self, part of the first ascent party.

336.9  The Frog - True Summit  5.5   The Frog’s actual summit appears to have been climbed (probably years ago, to reach the high point).  Move 75 feet up South Side Shuffle to an oak tree.  Twenty feet farther look for a slot on the left.  Walk up this slot 20 feet to the base of a bulge.  A few moves of fifth class up and left across the bulge and into an obvious, watermelon size hole lead to easy ground.  Gear: one 3 1/2 inch piece. There is no summit anchor.  FA Party: Unknown.   FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Brad Young, Bob Walton, Josh Mucci, Jennifer Wang, inspection and ascent of route, November 15, 2008.

351.1  The Great Escape  5.7 R  Climb Lonesome Dove on The Frog to its third bolt (often called the “off-route” bolt; some Lonesome Dove climbers skip this clip).  Move right and up past three more bolts to a low-angle, shallow water chute.  Climb this (easy but unprotected) 50 feet to The Frog’s summit, staying left near the top.  Move south (right) 20 feet to a two-bolt anchor (positioned here to best protect a follower). FA Party: John Cook and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 8, 2019.  Source(s):  Watched the first ascent being made and did the second ascent minutes later with Mark Fletcher.

351.3  Spoof Proof Roof  5.9 ** (Not shown on topo.)  The upper half of Spoof Proof Roof is easy to see from the normal approach to The Frog.  View it from a point just above The Snail.  Look for a prominent, gray water chute in the left half of The Frog’s west face.  Although it isn’t apparent from a distance, this chute does not reach the ground but instead drops over a large roof, 35 feet up.  Start the route on an apron of rock below the chute.  Two bolts protect easy climbing to the roof.  Continue up and left, past two more bolts, over the roof and into the chute.  Three more bolts (seven lead bolts total) protect easier climbing in the chute to its end, at a two-bolt anchor, 95 feet up. FA Party: Brad Young, Mark Fletcher,  Larry Arthur, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date: April 8, 2019.  Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

351.6  Ribbet and Croak  5.6 R *  This two-pitch climb starts on a 30 inch high, flat-topped boulder, 200 feet right from the start of Lonesome Dove.  The easy-to-see first bolt is 12 feet up.  Climb straight up past this bolt, past a second and to a third bolt, located well below a large, rotten, up-and-right roof/overlap.  Continue up and right to a fourth bolt.  Climb more up than right to get to the fifth bolt.  Bolts six and seven are further right (the rock gets a little loose after seven).  Finish to the right and then up to a two-bolt anchor located just above the lip of the roof, 105 feet from the start.  The second pitch is 65 feet long.  Start by moving a short distance left to a bolt.  Continue left to a second bolt (not visible from the belay).  Easy but somewhat run-out climbing leads past a third bolt and then up and a little right, to the top of the face just north of The  Frog’s large, “true” summit block.  There is no top anchor, move down the opposite (east) side of the top ridge (onto the route South Side Shuffle, listed below).  Belay there using body position.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  November 4, 2018.  Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud’nCrud Forums “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” November 5, 2018; ascents of route with Bob Walton, December 12, 2018, and Mark Fletcher December 28, 2018.

352.11  Tadpole Rock - East Face  5.7 X  Tadpole Rock is the obvious formation 200 feet north of The Frog.  Its north face is steep to quite steep.  The lower angle, tall, east face has an “alluvial fan” shape (wider at the bottom, narrowing toward the top). Access this face by walking down along the gully-like south side of the formation. Start climbing on a clean section of slab, where that south side curves around to form the east face (this start point is left of an oak tree and well left of the remaining, steeper and very mossy, base of the east face).  Move up and right, on an easy but getting-harder slab (5.6). Continue unprotected to one hard-to-find bolt, 70 feet from the start. The bolt protects crux moves over a steeper bulge. Finish at a three-bolt anchor on top, 100 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Brad Young, Bob Walton, Jennifer Wang, Josh Mucci, inspection and ascent, November 15, 2008.

352.13  A Rock, a Hammer and a Black Eye  5.11a  This route is on the far right (west) end of the north face of Tadpole Rock. Eight bolts protect climbing straight up, then left and up, and then up and right. The crux is getting to and then past the second bolt. The traversing up and right near the top is 5.10. There is a two bolt anchor on top. Walk off. Although the rock on this route looks good (and much of it actually is), there is enough so-so rock that no stars are given. FA Party: Alan Nilsson, Brad Young, Steve Dawson. FA Date: December 12, 2010. Source: Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.15  Brown Rice and Boogers  5.7 *  This route is also on the far right (west) end of the north face of Tadpole Rock; it starts 20 feet right of A Rock, a Hammer and a Black Eye.  Four bolts protect 65 feet of climbing.  A few moves from the ground lead to an obvious hole in the rock.  The first bolt can be clipped while standing in this hole.  Two more bolts protect climbing straight up.  After the third bolt the angle of the rock declines.  One more bolt protects climbing up and left to the two bolt anchor for A Rock, a Hammer and a Black Eye.  Walk off to the southeast.  FA Party: Brad and Tricia Young, Alan Nilsson.  FA Date:  December 9, 2009.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.33  Fixtures  5.6 *  This slabby route is located in the most distant part of The Outback.  
The Outback:  The Outback is the large, rock-filled area to the west and southwest of The Hand.  It is divided into The Near Outback (the peninsula-shaped set of slabs just west of The Hand and small pinnacles to their immediate south and west), The Central Outback (the next grouping of pinnacles to the south; separated from The Near Outback by 250 feet of grassy, brushy, sloped ground), and The Way Outback (the south-most formation, the one closest to Rubble Wall and Chalone Peak Trail; separated from The Central Outback by 300 feet of grassy, brushy, sloped ground).  The many formations that make up The Outback are described, along with all the formations that are southwest of the reservoir, in clockwise order (this is in keeping with the pattern set in the 2007 guidebook).  So, descriptions start with The Hand and The Snail, The Frog and Tadpole Rock, then move to The Way and Central Outbacks, and finish with The Near Outback.
The Way Outback:  The Way Outback consists of a jumble of bumps, ramps and faces oriented from west (uphill) to east (downhill).  The Way and Central Outbacks are similar in appearance, although The Way Outback does not have quite as many bumps and summits as The Central Outback.  The Way Outback is also notable for cliffs that make a huge, almost exactly 90 degree alcove/corner on its northeast/downhill side (this alcove faces at The Frog, although it is filled with trees and not visible from there).  
Approaches to The Way Outback:  There are two relatively brush-free ways to approach The Way Outback; one by way of The Hand (going past The Near and then Central Outbacks), and a second by way of The Frog and then the creek above The Hand and The Frog.
Approaching from The Hand:  This approach leads past both other areas of The Outback (and can be used to approach them as well).  Start from the base of the route Back of the Hand.  Move west (slightly uphill) 200 feet, through light brush to the base of a long, south-north oriented slab (the slab is part of The Near Outback).  There are two ways to move south (left) from the base of this slab:  1.)  Continue south (left) 250 feet along the base (heavy brush) to a gap which allows a move west (right) and into relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback.  2.)  Climb to the top of the slab (very easy fifth class up and left; there is a two-bolt anchor directly above the start of this ascent, 20 feet further right from where it ends).  From the top of the slab, turn left (south), continuing along the slab’s top (which is mostly rock) to the same relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback.  From the clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback, the north side of The Central Outback becomes visible as does Outback Buttress above it.  Move through light brush to Outback Buttress, pass below (west) of it to its northeast side and grassy slopes.   Move down/across these slopes directly to The Way Outback (go to the north-facing/downhill toe of The Way Outback in order to find the route Fixtures).  
Approaching from The Frog:  Walk to The Frog and then move south along its west face to its southwest corner.  Continue southwest (downhill) through brush, toward the creek that flows between The Frog and The Outback.  Once in the creek, move upstream, aiming for a wide, brush-free area above the creek and directly below the north/downhill toe of The Way Outback (this approach past The Frog and up the creek also works to get to the lower sections of The Central Outback).  One hundred yards of gentle uphill through this wide, brush-free area leads directly to the north/downhill toe of The Way Outback at The Inverted Jug.  
This Route:  Find the route Fixtures by first approaching the north/lowest downhill toe of the Way Outback. Once there it is easy to locate The Inverted Jug.  This feature is an odd, undercut, 40 foot high, separate pinnacle.  It is separated by a three-foot gap from the main, north-facing slab that makes up The Way Outback’s lowest toe.  Fixtures climbs this slab past five bolts, 65 feet to a two-bolt anchor on top of the cliff.  Of note are two six foot long, steel fence posts laying on top of the cliff top, 20 feet from this anchor.  These posts are at least one half mile from the nearest trail or fence line (new or old).  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  October 23, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

352.33  Inverted Jug  5.9 *  This undercut, 45 foot-high pinnacle is located next to the slab that makes up the lowest downhill toe of The Way Outback.  The route Fixtures, which is on that slab, is located three feet from Inverted Jug’s west side.  Start climbing Inverted Jug at the base of its south face.  Move up 10 feet onto a thin ledge.  Three closely-spaced bolts lead up and right to an awkward stance at the base of a short, right-facing corner (now on the pinnacle’s east face).  A fourth bolt protects moves to a broad ledge and a fifth bolt, which protects easy moves onto the summit.  A two-bolt anchor allows a 45 foot rappel to the ground.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 28, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.431  The Central Outback - East Summit  5.3  This 30 foot route is the only easy way to The Central Outback’s east summit.
The Central Outback:  The main part of The Central Outback has many lumps, bumps and small ridges.  These are oriented southwest (uphill) to northeast (downhill - toward the creek that flows between The Hand and The Frog).  Among these bumps and lumps are two low but distinct summits which are both inaccessible except by technical climbing. Outback Buttress is part of The Central Outback and should be noted too. This separate formation stands apart and above the rest of the descending lumps, bumps, and small ridges that make up the main part of that area.  Outback Buttress is 50 feet high on its downhill side, and can be walked onto on its uphill side.  
Approaches to The Central Outback:  There are two relatively brush-free ways to approach The Central Outback; one by way of The Hand and The Near Outback, the other by way of The Frog and the creek between The Hand and The Frog.
Approaching from The Hand:  This approach leads past both other areas of The Outback (and can be used to approach them as well).  Start from the base of the route Back of the Hand.  Move west (slightly uphill) 200 feet, through light brush to the base of a long, south-north oriented slab (the slab is part of The Near Outback).  There are two ways to move south (left) from the base of this slab:  1.)  Continue south (left) 250 feet along the base (heavy brush) to a gap which allows a move west (right) and into relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback.  2.)  Climb to the top of the slab (very easy fifth class up and left; there is a two-bolt anchor directly above the start of this ascent, 20 feet further right from where it ends).  From the top of the slab, turn left (south), continuing along the slab’s top (which is mostly rock) to the same relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback.  From the clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback, the north side of The Central Outback becomes visible as does Outback Buttress above it.  Move through light brush uphill to Outback Buttress, pass below (west) of it to its northeast side and grassy slopes.  These slopes lead gently downhill to the upper reaches of The Central Outback, 200 feet below Outback Buttress.  Continue more steeply downhill among descending ramps, bumps and summits to a flat area just behind/west of The Central Outback - East Summit (between it and The Central Outback - North Summit).  Note, it is also possible to cross from The Near Outback directly to the northwest side of The Central Outback.  A slot between The Central Outback - West Summit and the rock to its right (southwest/uphill) allows access to a flat area between The Central Outback - East and West Summits.  This approach is shorter and involves less elevation change, but it is also much brushier.  
Approaching from The Frog:  Walk to The Frog and then move south along its west face to its southwest corner.  Continue southwest (downhill) through brush, toward the creek that flows between The Frog and The Outback.  Once in the creek, move upstream, aiming for a wide, brush-free area above the creek and directly below the north/downhill toe of The Way Outback (yes, this is upstream from a point directly below The Central Outback).  Move up and right (northwest) through the wide brush-free area 200 yards to non-descript slabs that make up the southeast extent of The Central Outback.  From these non-descript slabs move north (over the slabs and through low notches between them) 150 yards to the flat area between The Central Outback - East and West Summits.    
The Central Outback’s East and West Summits:  Below Outback Buttress, The Central Outback descends in a series of bumps, ramps and summits (these make up most of The Central Outback).  Most of these bumps and summits are tiny, accessible by walking, or both.  The two lowest summits, however, have fifth class uphill sides.  The tops of the two formations are about 125 feet from each other. Viewed from above, West Summit is to the left and East Summit is to the right (from about 200 feet above, East Summit is easy to see and very blunt - much wider on top than it is tall - while West Summit is hidden behind another, easy-to-walk-onto rock).
This Route:  Climb The Central Outback - East Summit in the center of its wide, 30 foot high, southwest face.  The crux (and only fifth class) is the start, a six foot high headwall.  A two-bolt anchor on top allows a descent by rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  January 18, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.
 
352.432  The Central Outback - West Summit  5.4  This route is located on a separate summit 125 feet west of The Central Outback - East Summit.  Start from a point between the two formations.  Move west, almost into the 15 foot gap between this summit and the wall to its south (left).  Climb 15 feet to the top of a slab on West Summit’s southeast side.  From the top of the slab, move right, over a short headwall onto a ramp (optional four inch piece).  Follow the ramp to a wide shoulder southeast of the summit.  Steep moves on good rock (sling a large knob) lead to the top, 45 feet from the start.  A two-bolt anchor allows a rappel back to the start of the route.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  January 18, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

352.51  Didgeridoo  5.3  This route is on the east face of Outback Buttress.  Look for a low-angle chute that narrows significantly 25 feet up (a very large, narrow, and unmistakably-shaped knob on the left side of the chute 35 feet up helps with route identification).  A bolt protects the squeeze.  A second bolt protects climbing up the last, fading-away portion of the chute.  Traverse right to finish at the two-bolt anchor for Lonesome Me (listed next).  Walk off the top.  FA Party:  John Cook, Brad Young, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  November 12, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.52  Lonesome Me  5.5 *  This route is on the east face of Outback Buttress.  Start in a prominent, steep stem-box/chimney to the left of the center of the face.  Five bolts protect 45 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor.  Walk off the top.  The first half of this climb is slightly overhanging (it’s about as steep as 5.5 can get) but allows easy stemming.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  December 21, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

352.54  Off With Her Hands  5.5 *  Climb the steep and very featured north face of Outback Buttress.  Four bolts lead to a two-bolt anchor 45 feet from the start.   FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  December 22, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.  

352.88  Primrose Pinnacle  5.3  Primrose Pinnacle is part of a northwest-facing, curving cliff band that defines the north edge of the western half of The Near Outback (Primrose stands 20 feet above the rest of the cliff).  This same cliff band makes up the head of a valley (it’s the next valley west of the valley between The Frog and The Hand).  Although Primrose Pinnacle is at the head of this other valley, heavy brush and the cliff itself make it very hard to approach up that feature. Instead, approach from near the start of the route Back of the Hand.  Move west (slightly uphill) 200 feet, through light brush to the base of a long, south-north oriented slab. From the base of the slab continue in one of two ways.   1.)  Continue south (left) 250 feet along the base of the slab (heavy brush) to a gap which allows a move west and into relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback.  Continue west through brush to the cliff edge and Primrose Pinnacle (as described below).  2.)  Climb 40 feet to the top of the slab (easy fifth class up and left; there is a two-bolt anchor directly above the start of this ascent, 20 feet right of where it ends).  From the top of the slab, turn left (south), continuing along its top (which is mostly rock) to relatively clear areas in the middle of The Near Outback (this second approach allows a climber to view Primrose from a distance more quickly and might be worth the fifth class effort).  Once in the clear areas in the middle of The Central Outback, look into the next canyon to the west; this canyon ends among slabs (on the near side) and cliffs and small pinnacles (at its head, to the left/southwest).  Primrose Pinnacle is among these cliffs and is the largest of the small pinnacles.  Its lower (north) face is 60 feet high and its upper (south/southeast) face is 20 feet high.  Approach from the relatively brush free area through thicker brush to its upper side. Almost all of the formation is seriously undercut - the exception is a face/ramp that starts on the southeast part of the pinnacle and crosses its east face before finishing on the pinnacle's north side.  The start moves are extremely exposed (a belay anchored to stout bushes was used on the first ascent).  These moves lead to a shoulder of rock and a hidden bolt. Another crux is followed by climbing to the top.  A two bolt anchor allows an overhanging rappel back to the start.  FA Party:  Jim McConachie, Brad Young, Joel Primrose.  FA Date:  February 23, 2013.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.914  A Grand Adventure  5.6 *  This route is on Junction Rock, the largest of several formations located one quarter mile upstream from the reservoir, very close to Bear Gulch Creek.
The Junction Rock Area:  Three different “Junction” formations are named for the nearby streams that flow into Bear Gulch Creek.  Multiple climber use-trails branch off from the “main” trail in the same vicinity (the main trail is the old, dirt, CCC road).  Junction Rock and Junction Slab are located on the south side of the creek and face north and west.  Junction Boulder is across the creek from Junction Slab; it is the only large rock among a group of mostly small pinnacles (it can also be identified by the pine tree on its top).
Approach:  Find this area by crossing the dam at the reservoir, continuing on the use-trail on the reservoir’s south side and then at its upper reaches crossing to the old, dirt CCC road that makes up the trail to back country areas like The Frog, The Gargoyle, Knuckle Ridge and Chimney Sweep.  Junction Rock is located 250 feet beyond the side creek that leads to The Hand (keep on the main trail).  It stands barely past the side creek that leads up toward Chimney Sweep.
This Route:  A Grand Adventure climbs the center of Junction Rock’s west face (the route faces the creek).  Low angle climbing leads to a bolt 15 feet up.  Move past a horizontal crack (optional gear from one to two inches) to a second bolt on a headwall.  Crux moves lead to a nice slung lodestone and then two more bolts on easier terrain.  Continue up and a little right, over another headwall (and a second slung knob) to even easier ground and the route’s fifth bolt.  Another 15 feet of climbing lead to a ledge and a two-bolt anchor 70 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jim McConachie, David Harden, Bill McConachie, Mark Fletcher, Lisa Lee, Aaron McDonald, King Humann, Caitlyn Rich, Alexandra Barbella, Scott Ward, Kathy Cook, Robert Behrens, Noal Elkins, Brian Hamilton, Bob Walton, Shane Hill, Whitney Reynier, Jon Cochran, Bill Flaherty, Laura Dawson, Gretchen Huston, Andrew Schwartz, John Cook, Chloe Siegel, Henry Maguire, Steve Dawson, Alex Dawson, Tricia Young.  FA Date:  February 25, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.915  Party Crasher  5.5  R  Start on a low-angle apron, 20 feet right of A Grand Adventure.  Move up a shallow, short, wide trough to a headwall (a horizontal crack at the base of the headwall takes gear from ½ to two inches).  Sling knobs to protect moves over the headwall.  Easy climbing leads to the fourth bolt of A Grand Adventure.  Move up that route’s second headwall (use the same slung knob) before moving up and a little left on run-out but easier terrain to a separate small summit.  Use body position to belay.  Descend by walking off the formation’s backside or by moving over 30 feet to A Grand Adventure’s top anchor.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery of route’s one bolt (now replaced) while climbing A Grand Adventure.

352.923  Celebration Slab  5.3 *  Junction Slab is located 200 feet upstream (south) from Junction Rock.  Like Junction Rock, Junction Slab faces west-northwest, directly at Bear Gulch Creek.  Celebration Slab is a very featured, fun climb up the center of Junction Slab’s west face.  Five bolts (and possible slung knobs) lead to a two-bolt anchor 95 feet up.  The anchor allows a rappel back to the base; it is also possible to walk off to the right (south).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Brad Young, Dave Harden, Jon Cochran, Jim McConachie.  FA Date:  February 25, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

352.926  Geezer Pleezer  5.0 *  Start partway up the right edge of Junction Slab’s west face.  An up-and-left ramp leads past one bolt and a slung knob to join Celebration Slab at its last bolt.  FA Party:  John Cook (free solo, he placed the bolts later the same day).  FA Date:  February 24, 2017.  Source(s):  Discussion with Cook moments after he finished the climb; discussion with Bill McConachie and Kathy Cook after they led the route the same day; ascent of route on February 25, 2017.

352.941  Junction Boulder - Summit Route  5.4  Junction Boulder is the largest of several boulders located on the hillside across the creek from Junction Rock (a pine grows out of the top of the rock).  Gain the spacious summit by climbing the 25 foot high west/uphill side of the rock.  Descend by down climbing or by making a pinnacles rappel (don't rappel from the tree; it has a shallow root base and using it as an anchor will eventually kill it).  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of route with Robert Behrens on February 25, 2017.

352.943. Conjunction Junction  5.10d  Climb the steep northeast side of Junction Boulder past five bolts.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor 55 feet from the start. FA Party:  Steve Dawson, Brian Hamilton, Brad Young.  FA Date:  April 7, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.  

352.962  Ghost Town  5.5  Ghost Town is on the Ghost Slabs, which are upstream from Junction Rocks.  
The Ghost Slabs:  The Ghost Slabs are a series of three formations (East, Middle and West) located on the north bank of Bear Creek a few hundred feet north of the creek.  East Ghost Slab is 250 yards upstream from Junction Slab, Middle is 275 yards up, and West Ghost Slab is at 300 yards (the fourth formation in the area, Spasm Block, route 353 in the 2007 guidebook, is 350 yards from Junction Slab, west of the Ghost Slabs, on the same side of the creek).  All three Ghost Slabs face south, toward the creek.  The Ghost Slabs are easy to see from below.  When viewed from the use-trail just above Bear Creek, East is to the right and West to the left.  However, a thick band of brush below the crags prevents access from that trail.  Approach instead through clear areas on the north bank, starting east of East Ghost Slab.  Continue across these clear areas levelly directly to the base of the slabs.  Routes are described formation by formation in the order they are encountered on the approach upstream.  So, East Ghost Slab is listed first, then Middle and West, with Spasm Block last.
Ghost Town:  Climb the very visible groove and crack toward the left side of its south face.  The route protects with gear from small to four inches and one bolt.  Awkward moves lead to a ledge.  More awkward moves above the ledge are protected by the bolt.  Finish through a slot onto the hillside behind the formation, 45 feet from the start.  Belay using body position.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date: January 20, 2019.  Source(s):  Watched first ascent being made; ascent of route with Ron Skelton minutes later.

352.964  Ghost Pepper  5.7 *  Ghost Pepper climbs Middle Ghost Slab.  The right side of that formation’s south face includes a series of small to medium, right-and-slightly-up ledges.  Start just left of the left end of these ledges.  Four bolts protect 55 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor on top.  Descend by making a six foot, class three downclimb off the back.  FA Party:  Alan Nilsson, Jim McConachie, Ron Skelton.  FA Date:  January 20, 2019.  Source(s):  Watched first ascent being made; ascent of route with Kathy Cook minutes later.

352.966  Ghost Writer  5.6 *  West Ghost Slab is as big as East and Middle combined.  Most of the rock on its south face is of poor quality.  The exception is a prominent, gray-colored water streak very near the slab’s right edge.  Start Ghost Writer just right of this streak, moving up and left to a bolt in the streak, 30 feet above its lowest point.  Three more bolts protect climbing in and then right of the streak.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor 60 feet from the start.  Walk off.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  February 24, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

359.5  Mister Mud Goes to Washington  5.10c  This 60 foot route is located near the far left (south) end of Piedras Bonitas Cliff, 100 yards southwest (uphill) of Twin Boulders.  It climbs a shorter section of cliff that isn’t as steep or high as the vertical-to-overhanging middle.  Look to the left of Piedras Bonitas’s leftmost, huge chimney (that chimney is split into two by a thin buttress that is half as high as the cliff to its right).  A large roof extends to the left of this chimney.  It is 20 feet above the ground and, at first, mostly horizontal.  As it extends left, the roof changes to slightly up-and-left, and then continues up-and-left at a 45 degree angle.  Mister Mud Goes to Washington climbs a wide, faint black streak with a seam, directly below the steeper, far left end of this roof.  A crux bulge leads to the route’s first bolt, 12 feet up.  Lower-angle climbing past two more bolts leads to a short section of squeeze chimney (one to four inch gear).  Finish up and left to a ledge and a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Geoff Norris, Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, John Cook.  FA Date:  November 9, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

363.21  Coffee Can Pinnacle - Your Ad Goes Here 5.8  Coffee Can Pinnacle is located 100 yards east of Piedras Bonitas Cliff, on a north-south oriented ridge that makes up the west rim of Forgotten Valley.
Forgotten Valley:  Forgotten Valley is the drainage system to the east of Coffee Can Pinnacle, south of Goat Rock (and its small satellites), southwest of Scout Peak and The Shaft, and west of Knuckle Ridge.  Several formations are located in or on the rim of the valley, including Coffee Can Pinnacle, Paleface and Whaleback.
Coffee Can Pinnacle:  Coffee Can Pinnacle is the south-most pinnacle on a north-south oriented ridge 100 yards east of Piedras Bonitas Cliff’s north end (it is 100 yards northeast/uphill from The Gargoyle).  Coffee Can looks like two “blobs” of rock, one sitting on top of the other, with a noticeable “waist” of deeply indented rock between the two blobs.  It is 65 feet high measured from its low end, and 25 feet high where the ground is highest on the pinnacle’s north side.  There is a slightly smaller formation (which consists of one “blob”) on the same ridge, 15 feet due north.  
This Route:  Your Ad Goes Here starts on the north side of the rock.  A few class three moves lead onto a large ledge.   Move right (south) along the west side of the formation 20 feet to where the ledge narrows.  A bolt here protects very bouldery, exposed moves over a low overhang.  Fifteen feet of easy movement lead to a large summit and a two-bolt anchor.  It is possible to use two-inch gear in a crack down and left from the protection bolt as a belay anchor.  Although the rock on this climb is very good, there isn’t enough fifth class movement to merit a star.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  Note too that the formation had been summited before, almost certainly by way of a rope-toss and prusik; an old coffee can was discovered on top of the pinnacle, under a rock, all as detailed in this Mudn’Crud thread: http://www.mudncrud.com/forums/index.php?topic=2529.0  FA Date:  December 11, 2016.  Source(s): Self, the first ascentionist.

363.22  The Best Part of Waking Up  5.7  Climb the southwest corner of Coffee Can Pinnacle (the corner toward The Gargoyle).  Four bolts lead 70 feet to the summit; move 20 feet north to the two-bolt anchor for Your Ad Goes Here.  FA Party:  Steve Dawson, Laura Dawson, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  December 18, 2016.  Source(s):  Witnessed first ascent; ascent of route with John Cook and Tricia Young on December 19, 2016; Ascent of route with Tricia Young and John Cook, December 19, 2016.

363.41 Into the Labyrinth 5.5 This route is on a small pinnacle that is 100 yards south of the formation Paleface (described next below). Several even smaller pinnacles are located on a low ridge northwest (uphill) from this climb. Into the Labyrinth ascends the uphill (north) side of the pinnacle. Fifteen feet of climbing (with 50 feet of exposure to the left) leads to the summit and a two-bolt anchor. The rock is good on this climb and at least one nice knob can be tied off for protection. FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 27, 2016.  Source(s):  Discussion about/description of the route with Mark Fletcher on December 28, 2016; solo ascent of route on January 15, 2017.

363.51  How Fortunate the Man With None 5.6  This route is located on the formation known as Paleface.  Paleface is located in Forgotten Valley, just over 200 yards south from Nanny Goat Rock, and 250 feet southwest (gently downhill) of its larger neighbor, Whaleback.  Paleface is fairly long and thin, oriented due east to due west.  It has a distinctive, taller, light-colored south face. This route starts at the far right edge of that face (at a belay bolt one foot off the ground). Move up and left past five bolts, 75 feet to the anchor for the route Give Me Sixty Nine Years (listed below). Rappel Paleface's north side (down Give Me Sixty Nine Years) 25 feet to the ground. FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  January 1, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from Mark Fletcher on January, 2017; ascent of route with Kathy Cook on January 15, 2017.

363.52  On a Pale Face  5.6  This route is on the right edge of Paleface's south face. Start in the same place as for the route How Fortunate the Man With None, but climb straight up (the two route's first bolts are at the same height, seven feet apart).  Five bolts lead to a flat shoulder and a two-bolt anchor 45 feet up.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.   FA Date:  December 11, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched Fletcher from near Coffee Can Pinnacle while he was making the ascent; email from him detailing this and other nearby routes December 12, 2016; ascents of route on December 17, 2016 by Brad Young, Brian Hamilton, John Cook, Kathy Cook and Whitney Reynier.

363.53  Chaos in Motion  5.7 R  Climb the flared slot just right of On a Pale Face.  The rock in the slot is terrible and, although it is possible to place gear, it is unlikely that any of it would hold even body weight.  Join On a Pale Face at its fourth bolt (which is 20 feet up this route), finishing at that route’s anchor 30 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 11, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Mark Fletcher on December 12, 2016; ascent of route with Brian Hamilton on December 17, 2016.

363.54  Give Me Sixty Nine Years  5.3 *  This route is on the shorter, north side of Paleface.  Look for a water groove to the right (west) of center.  Two bolts protect the first part of the route (the first is in a huge, deeply imbedded lodestone).  A sling over a knob protects the top out to a two-bolt anchor 25 feet from the start.  The rock on this climb is very good.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 9, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Mark Fletcher on December 12, 2016; ascent of route with Brian Hamilton on December 17, 2016.

363.61  Whaleback - Stairway to the Sun  5.0 *  The formation Whaleback is 250 feet northeast (slightly uphill) from Paleface.  Whaleback is the bigger of the two formations; its south (downhill) side is tall, steep, and rotten, and its north (uphill) side much shorter.  Stairway to the Sun climbs the striking, exposed west ridge of this formation.  Thirty feet of easy class five leads to a long length of class three and then a class four finish.  At least 10 knobs and lodestones can be slung for protection (three of these are really good).  It is 140 feet from start to summit.  There is no summit anchor; use body position behind a hump.  Descend by downclimbing a short distance east and then north to the ground.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 9, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Mark Fletcher on December 12, 2016; solo ascent of route on December 17, 2016.

364.1  Flue Fire  5.11a *  This bolted line is 60 feet right of/around a corner from Chimney Sweep.  Three bolts Protect an initial scoop/water chute (the third bolt is hard to see - it is up and left from second bolt).  The route crux is passing the obvious bulge.  A fourth bolt then protects easier climbing to the top of the formation (move left and then up from that fourth bolt).  End at a two-bolt top anchor that is shared with Chimney Sweep (the two routes merge toward the top; a second bolt was added to this anchor on May 1, 2010, by Jim McConachie, a first ascent author of both routes).  FA Party:  John Barbella, Jim McConachie, Bill McConachie, Dennis Erik S (FA party called the route "5.10+").  FA Date:  May 4, 2008.  Source(s):  Discussion with Jim McConachie; also Brad Young, Joe Denicola, Erik Bratton ascents and attempted ascents of route.

364.13  Merry Poppins  5.11a *  This short crack climb is located on the Chimney Sweep formation, 175 feet right of Flue Fire.  Look for a shallow, left-facing corner on the south-facing side of a buttress which protrudes to the east from the main rock.  Small to medium gear protect 30 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor (the route ends here because the rock deteriorates above).  FA Party:  King Humann, Jon Cochran, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date:  February 25, 2017.  Source(s):  Several discussions with Jon Cochran spanning the time from when the route was a just-started project until a discussion a few minutes after it was redpointed.

364.71 Tutor Rock - Middle Summit  Class Three  Tutor Rock is located 100 yards west (gentle uphill) from the north end of Chimney Sweep (there is one intervening cliff face between the two). Tutor is long and slender and oriented south (downhill) to north (uphill). Its highest summit (a brushy walk-on from the northwest) is separated from its middle summit by a 25 foot wide corridor. Walk into this corridor to a groove on this summit's northwest side. The groove leads 45 feet to the top (the two bolt anchor for the route Private Lessons is located on a secondary summit, 10 feet to the southwest). FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown. Source(s):  Solo ascent of route on January 15, 2017.

364.72 Private Lessons 5.1 (TR) A (newly replaced) two-bolt anchor is located 10 feet to the southwest of Tutor Rock's middle summit. This anchor is oriented toward the formation's west face. Toprope (or free solo) the left side of this face, 50 feet to the anchor (pass over a prominent ledge 20 feet up). FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery of ancient, unbelievably bad, two quarter-inch bolt anchor at the top of the face, followed by inspection and exploration of that and surrounding areas and a free solo ascent of route on January 15, 2017.

364.8  The Outpost  5.8  The Outpost stands all by itself on a ridge-top, 200 yards due south of The Outcast and Knuckle Ridge (100 yards southwest The Mollusk).  The pinnacle is 40 feet high on its uphill (east) side.  Climb that side by moving class three up onto a broad, grassy ledge.  Boulder up the obvious weakness (almost a water streak) to a large, flat summit.  Descend by making a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of route with John Cook on December 19, 2016.

364.92  Bare Bones  5.1  Bare Bones is the left-most of three routes located on the tall west and south sides of The Way Station.  
The Way Station:  The Way Station is a fairly large, slabby formation located 200 feet southwest of the southern tip of The Outpost.  Walk to it from The Outpost or from the creek that makes up the approach to The Gargoyle and Piedras Bonitas Cliff.  Routes on The Way Station are listed from left-to-right starting with the formation’s northwest side.
Bare Bones:  Bare Bones climbs the blunt but distinct north/left edge of the formation’s west face.  Start below the edge, about 30 feet above the bottom of the rock/top of the brush.  Class three leads to a small hanging meadow. Pass to the left (north) of the meadow, staying near the (exposed) left side of the west face.  Slung knobs protect climbing to a bolt 50 feet from the start.  More knobs protect moves to a flat spot 20 feet above the bolt.  Continue 30 more feet to the summit.  Belay using body position.  Descend, class three, down the east side of the formation.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  May 3, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 9, 2017; solo ascent of route on October 23, 2017.

364.94  Johnnycake  5.0  Johnnycake climbs to and then along the blunt but distinct south/right edge of The Way Station’s west face.  Start in a wide gray streak, 60 feet down (left) from the start of Two Bits (listed next).  Climb the streak 25 feet to a slight up-and-right ramp (just before a small, hanging meadow).  The ramp leads to two shallow scoops, one directly above the other.  A bolt protects moves out of the second scoop (this bolt is very difficult to see from the ground).  Continue along the right (south) edge of this face, passing another bolt 30 feet above the first.  Belay at the Two Bits anchor, 120 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 6, 2017.  Source(s):   Email from John Cook on October 9, 2017; solo ascent of route on October 23, 2017.

364.96  Two Bits  5.3  Two Bits climbs a distinct gray water streak on the south side of The Way Station.  The bottom of the streak is 100 feet downhill (west) from the formation’s uphill toe.  Climb up and right between two huge lodestones to a bolt 40 feet from the start.  Continue in the streak to a second bolt, which protects steeper climbing and the route crux.  A bolt and a sling knob provide a belay on the summit, 80 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  May 3, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on October 9, 2017; solo ascent of route on October 23, 2017.

370.41  False Alarm  5.4  False Flatiron is a large formation located halfway between Toadstool and Ridge Crest Rock (and on a direct line between the two).  Its east side is large, the west not quite as much.  False Alarm climbs the uphill/northwest corner of the formation.  Start just left of Falsetto Slab (listed below; identify it by its lead bolt).  Move up and left to a bolt on a blunt arete 15 feet off the ground.  Traverse left around the arete to a ramp; move up this to the top of a shoulder (gear from ½ to 1½ inch).  A second bolt protects moves onto the top, 40 feet from the start and five feet from the two-bolt summit anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Laura Rosensteel.  FA Date:  April 9, 2017.  Source(s):  Multiple April 2017 emails from John Cook regarding several new routes on False Flatiron; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.42  Falsetto Slab  5.2 R  Falsetto Slab ascends the far left side of False Flatiron’s uphill/west face.  Start in a slight groove (as for Pity the Fool and Original Route).  Quickly move up-and-left, heading for a protection bolt about three quarters of the way to the top. Finish just left (north) of a two-bolt summit anchor.  Rappel from the anchor or downclimb the class four Original Route (listed below).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.   FA Date:  March 25, 2017.  Source(s):  Posting by John Cook to Mud'nCrud thread “Quest for Mud,” March 26, 2017; telephone  conversation about the route with John Cook on April 4, 2017; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.43  Pity the Fool  5.2 R  Start in the same slight groove as for Falsetto Slab and Original Route. Move up and a little left with the groove where it gets shallow and a little steeper, reaching the top of False Flatiron right at the two-bolt summit anchor. There is no significant protection available on this route; it is essentially a short free solo.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  April 9, 2017.  Source(s):  Multiple April 2017 emails from John Cook regarding several new routes on False Flatiron; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.44  False Flatiron - Original Route  Class Four  Start in the same slight groove as for Falsetto Slab and Pity the Fool, but exit the groove up-and-right where it fades and gets steeper.  Reach the summit 40 feet from the start. Descend using the two-bolt summit anchor or by downclimbing.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown.  Source(s):  Solo ascent of route on January 15, 2017.

370.47  Foolish Pleasure  5.3 *  This route is located on the southwest side of False Flatiron, almost 100 feet down and right of Original Route.  The start is about 40 feet into the narrowing corridor between False Flatiron and the smaller formation to its southwest.  An up-and-left crack leads to a shoulder 25 feet up (gear from ½ to three inches).  Climb the face/blunt arete above the shoulder (sling knobs) to a bolt, which is 70 feet from the start of the route.  Continue 15 more feet to the summit.  Belay near the end of the route using body position and sling knobs or walk the ridge another 35 feet to the two-bolt anchor at the top of the formation.  This route gets a star for its length and exposure.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.   FA Date:  April 1, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on April 3, 2017; telephone conversation with John Cook on April 4, 2017; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.48  Monkey Business  5.3  Move 50 feet further down-gully from the start of  Foolish Pleasure.  Begin at a very low angle, left-facing corner, 25 feet above the point where the gully drops off at a cliff.  Move over the right/upper wall of the corner onto a low-angle ridge and instant exposure.  Easy climbing leads left, up the ridge, 30 feet to a bolt at the base of a headwall.  Move over the headwall to join Foolish Pleasure at a flat area, finishing on that route.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  April 21, 2017.  Source(s):  Multiple April 2017 emails from John Cook regarding several new routes on False Flatiron; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.55  Balance Beam  Class Three  This route follows the line-of-least-resistance to the top of the independent formation that is just southwest of False Flatiron (the two formations are separated by a 25 foot wide - but narrowing - corridor).  Begin on the west side of the formation’s north summit (the side away from False Flatiron, about 20 feet right of this rock’s 15 foot high, undercut, highest point).  Move 35 feet to the north summit; continue south along a narrow ridge to the south summit.  Descend by reversing the route.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  April 9, 2017.  Source(s):  Multiple April 2017 emails from John Cook regarding several new routes on False Flatiron; solo ascent of route on May 2, 2017.

370.9. Yellowflower Pinnacle  Class Four  Yellowflower Pinnacle is located 400 feet downhill/southeast from the downhill side of False Flatiron.  It is the lowest-on-the-hill rock of a series below that large formation.  Yellowflower Pinnacle is steep to undercut on all but its north corner.  A wide, right-curving ramp there leads 45 feet to a broad summit.  There is no top anchor. FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown. Source(s):  Discovery and ascent of route with Mark Fletcher, April 7, 2019.

381.1  Welcome Respite  5.6 R  This hard to protect route starts 25 feet right of Catatonic Stupor.  Climb a ramp on decent rock to a headwall 30 feet up.  One bolt protects the headwall.  Continue on somewhat lower angle rock, near the right-facing corner, through loose sections, to finish at one anchor bolt (to the left of the chimney between the second and third knuckles).  Descend, by downclimbing that same chimney, to the west (toward the opposite side from where the route comes up), or move 35 feet left (south) to the Catatonic Stupor anchor and make a 115 foot rappel.  Gear:  small to 3 ½ inches, slings for knobs and one bolt.  Although the first ascent of this route was made free solo, the first ascent author recommended that any future climbers place a bolt or two for protection (which was done on the route’s second ascent).  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  February 15, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, watched Emmons make the first ascent; watched John Cook make the route’s second ascent; climbed the route October, 2015.

381.4  Witch’s Broomstick  5.8  Witch’s Broomstick climbs a dark streak in lighter colored rock, 70 feet right of The Agony of Defeat (the streak really stands out, even from a quarter mile away; it’s a double streak up high and a single streak lower).  Six bolts protect 75 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Gavin Emmons, Kyle Queener.  FA Date:  March 21, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

382.1  O Brother Where Art Thou  5.6  This route climbs the northwest-facing, far north end of fourth knuckle’s west side.  Five bolts lead up-and-slightly-right to a two-bolt anchor, 60 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Caleb Rightmeyer, Kathy Cook, Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 2, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

383.6  Endless Summer  5.1  This route ascends the west side of the third knuckle on Knuckle Ridge.  Start left of center.  Climb to a bolt about 15 feet up.  Move up and right to a stance on a very large lodestone and a second bolt.  Continue up a slight groove to a third bolt on the right.  The crux headwall is right above.  Easy terrain leads to the top and a two-bolt anchor.  Most of this 70-foot route is class four.  Descend by a 65 foot rappel.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 9, 2017.  Source(s):  Email from Mark Fletcher, December 9, 2017; ascents of route with Kathy Cook, Caleb Rightmeyer and John Cook, December 17, 2017.

385.2  Shadows of Madness 5.10c **  Shadows of Madness is on the west pinnacle of Maniac’s Delight. Start at the formation’s lowest/north toe (right near a tiny stream bed). Six bolts protect 60 feet of good rock to a two-bolt anchor. The route crux is obvious from the ground - it comes between the second and fourth bolts where serious bulges force a climber up and left and then up and over. Of note: the route’s top anchor can be reached from the south side of the formation, up through a short chimney (to set the route up as a toprope for example). FA Party: Gavin Emmons, Jon Cochran, Kris Vanesky, Noal Elkins. FA Date: September 4, 2016. Source(s): Email from Emmons on September 4, 2016; inspection of route from the base January 17, 2017.

388.21 Dunce Cap - Southwest Arete  Class Four  Dunce Cap is a separate pinnacle located immediately southeast of Nit-Wit Knob (there is only a 10 foot gap between the two formation's bases). The relatively low-angle southwest arete of this formation leads 50 feet, directly to the summit. The first 15 feet of the arete are class four; the climbing is easier after that, but gets quite exposed. There is a two-bolt anchor on top (allowing a 50 foot rappel to the pinnacle's west base). FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s): Self; while participating in the first ascent of Class Clown (immediately below) this arete was climbed to determine if any previous climbers had left a summit anchor on Dunce Cap (they hadn't).  It seemed that this arete had been climbed before, since there were places where rocks had been broken off and the rock surface had a slightly used look in general.

388.26 Class Clown 5.7 *  This fun and well protected route is located on the left side of Dunce Cap's north face. Eight bolts protect climbing to a good stance below the summit block. Avoid poor rock on this block by traversing around right to a two bolt anchor. The route is 65 feet long, but the rappel down the formation's west side is only 50 feet. FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Noal Elkins, Brad Young, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  January 1, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

388.31  Tuff Chix  5.7  Tuff Chix is the left-most route on Deep Groove Wall, which is the name given to the wide, northeast face of Byzantium.  Byzantium is a large formation (not just a pinnacle) located just south of Nit-Wit Knob and The Knee and 150 yards north of Chimney Sweep.  Deep Groove Wall itself is 150 feet wide and 50 feet high; its left (southeast) end is 30 feet from Nit-Wit Knob (there are large boulders between the two).  Its right (northwest) end is 60 feet from Regular Route on The Knee.  Tuff Chix starts in a lower-angle water chute.  Three bolts protect climbing to an up-and-left ramp.  Awkward climbing here can be protected by two to four inch cams.  A fourth bolt at the end of the ramp protects moves up another water chute, past a fifth bolt and the route crux.  It is 65 feet to the end of the route and a two-bolt anchor.  Descend, class three to the northwest (toward the High Peaks).  Note:  This route’s anchor can now serve as a top anchor for the route No Country For Old Men, which ascends the opposite side of Byzantium.  FA Party:  Kathy Cook, Alacia Welch, Tricia Young, Lisa Lee.  Special note:  Tuff Chix was the first (and to date only) first ascent made at Pinnacles by a female-only climbing party.  No male climbers were allowed to participate in creating this route (with pride and in fun; men weren’t even allowed to belay or to do anything other than watch the ascent).  FA Date:  November 14, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, watched the first ascent and then made the route’s second lead.

388.33  Square Meal  5.8  Climb the next groove to the right of Tuff Chix.  Seven bolts lead 65 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  Descend, class three, to the northwest.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Laura Dawson, Steve Dawson, Mark Fletcher, Matt Ellis, Andrew Buckless.  FA Date:  April 30, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

388.34  Out to Lunch  5.9  Out to Lunch is also on Deep Groove Wall.  It climbs the water chute that is second from the right (the route is 20 feet left of No Room for Squares, which ascends the right-most chute on the face; see this list, immediately below).  Five bolts protect 55 feet of climbing to a separate two-bolt anchor.  The route has multiple cruxes.  Walk off to the right (northwest).  FA Party:  John Cook, Alexandra Barbella, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  October 25, 2015.  Source(s):  Brad Young arrived at Deep Groove Wall shortly after this route’s first lead; he made the route’s second lead and watched/belayed/discussed as Kathy Cook and Noal Elkins also did ascents.

388.35  No Room for Squares  5.8 *  This route climbs the right-most water chute on Deep Groove Wall (the first half of this chute is actually a shallow, left-facing corner).  Five bolts protect 50 feet of sustained 5.8 to a separate two-bolt anchor.  It is also possible to place small to medium gear before the first bolt.  Walk off to the right (northwest).  FA Party:  Noal Elkins, John Cook.  FA Date:  August 2, 2015.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook with details of the route; ascent of route (with both Cooks and Elkins) October 25, 2015.

388.4  Perne in a Gyre  5.6  Perne in a Gyre is on Byzantium’s small northwest face (it is not on the much larger, water streak filled northeast face; that side of Byzantium, which faces The Knee, is called Deep Groove Wall).  Climb a slabby, faint water streak, past three bolts in 45 feet.  There is a one bolt summit anchor.  A 30 second walk-off leads back to the base.  FA Party:  Jeff Stroh.  FA Date:  March 20, 2014.  Source(s):  Mud‘nCrud Forum:  “New Route,” from March 21, 2014, also ascent by Brad Young and Jennifer Wang, April 12, 2014.

388.5  No Country For Old Men  5.7 R This route is on the southwest face of Byzantium, on a shallow buttress which faces directly toward the Chimney Sweep formation.  From the south, look for an easy-to-see, slabby face just right of a third class water streak which is itself just right of a pine.  Three bolts lead to an anchorless summit (although it is possible to continue just past that summit a short distance to the top of Deep Groove Wall and the two-bolt anchor for Tuff Chix).  Descend, class three to the northwest (toward the High Peaks).  FA Party:  Jeff Stroh, Steve Imai.  FA Date:  May 13, 2010.  Source(s):  Mud‘nCrud Forum:  “First FA at Pinns,” from May 13, 2010, also ascent by Brad Young and Bob Walton, November 12, 2010.

388.91  Pow!  5.3  This route is located on the south end of Onomatopoeia Pinnacle.  Onomatopoeia Pinnacle is 100 yards northwest of Byzantium (toward the High Peaks, slightly uphill, very little brush).  It’s a noticeable, blunt pinnacle directly atop a significant, northeast-facing cliff.  Pow! is easy to see from the south; look for a short, up-and-right trending crack that ends about halfway up the formation.  Walk to the start (above the northeast-facing cliff) from the southwest.  Climb the crack to its top (pro from one to three inches).  A bolt protects moves onto an easy slab which leads to the summit (multiple slung knobs).  There is a two-bolt anchor on top of the pinnacle, 35 feet from the start.  FA Party:  John and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  March 18, 2017.  Source(s):  Verbal report by John Cook an hour after the first ascent; ascent of route with Laura Dawson on March 19, 2017.

388.92  Boom!  5.3  This short route’s only redeeming feature is the tremendous exposure a climber experiences in its first half.  Boom! is on the opposite side of Onomatopoeia Pinnacle from Pow! (it is on the formation’s north side).  From Onomatopoeia’s west side, walk 30 feet northeast, up a slab to the top of a cliff at the pinnacle’s north side.  One bolt protects moves onto a ramp over 65 feet of exposure.  A few more moves on loose rock lead to the summit and a shared, two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young and Laura Dawson.  FA Date:  March 19, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

389.1  Peeling Away  5.11b  This route is 175 feet upstream from the route/formation Little Mustagh.  It is on the third pinnacle of four encountered heading upstream (these four are all 30 to 45 feet high on their downhill sides; they are set among boulders, short cliffs and a tiny spire).  The route faces east (right at Little Mustagh).  Start in the creek, move onto a pedestal, then climb straight up past six bolts.  There is a two-bolt summit anchor.  FA Party:  (Bolt installation, on lead, and subsequent toprope) Dennis Erik Mr Mud, mudworm Xi; (first lead) Adam Long.  FA Dates:  June, 2007 (toprope), February 6, 2011 (lead).  Source(s):  Discussions with first ascentionists; Mud‘nCrud Forum, “Mr Mud’s new route (June 30, 2007):  Peeling Away;” and “Superbowl Sunday (A Trip Report);” also, communications with/by Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Mudworm Xi and Adam Long, February, 2011; inspection of route, February 13, 2017.

397.9  Little Scrapper  5.4 R  This route is located six feet left of the route Little Pipper (it is on the same formation, a very short, blunt buttress; Little Pipper climbs the right edge of the buttress and Little Scrapper climbs its left edge).  An easy ramp leads to steeper climbing above.  No pro.  Walk off.  FA Party:  John Cook (free solo).  FA Date:  October 27, 2012.  Source(s):  November 3, 2012, posting to Mud'nCrud Forum Thread:  “Newly Established and Found Routes (since the ’07 Guidebook),” follow-up email from Cook.

400.1 Puny Legs 5.4  This route shares a start with the route Grey Cleft. From the north side of Pipsqueak Pinnacle move east past an oak tree, to the northeast side of the formation behind (east of) Pipsqueak. Move down to the top of a slot, step over it and climb a mossy, class four ramp, 15 feet to a ledge. For Puny Legs continue straight up, past one bolt, to the top of the formation (the second part of Grey Cleft starts from this same ledge, ten feet left of Puny Legs). There is no summit anchor (there is a good place to use body position). FA: John Cook, Kathy Cook. FA Date: October 24, 2014. Source(s): Email report of route by John Cook, November 16, 2014, ascent of route with Roger Putnam, November 24, 2014.

401.5  Back Track  5.4  Back Track and Hat Trick (listed next) are on The Shako, a separate pinnacle located between Pipsqueak Pinnacle and The Snout.
The Shako:  The Shako is the largest of the several formations on the rock ridge to the northwest of Pipsqueak Pinnacle.  Identify The Shako most easily by the large, twin-trunked pine growing from near its summit.  It is 75 feet southeast of The Snout (when hiking outbound from Pipsqueak one reaches The Shako before reaching The Snout).  
Back Track:  This route ascends The Shako’s south side.  Reach this side by walking between The Shako and a smaller formation to its immediate west (toward Pipsqueak).  Climb a low-angle slot to a shoulder.  Continue up a short, loose slot to a platform and the pine tree.  Use the tree and rock to climb to the summit and a two-bolt anchor 75 feet from the start.  Descend by way of a 50-foot rappel off the formation’s west side.  Gear: one to three inches, plus extra slings.  FA Party:  Brad Young and Tricia Young.  FA Date:  February 11, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

401.6  Hat Trick  5.5  This route starts on The Shako’s northeast corner (on the ridge-top, where The Shako is closest to The Snout).  Move onto a five-foot high flake/block and then up five more feet onto a ledge and a fixed piton 15 feet from the start (the piton is a long Lost Arrow, buried to its eye).  Move up and left to a ledge and a bolt, then up and right on a ramp, and up and left on another.  A second bolt protects another up-and-right ramp.  Finish with an up-and-left traverse along the summit boulders to the formation’s high point and a two-bolt anchor 75 feet from the start.  Gear: from one to three inches and many slings.  FA Party:  Brad Young and Tricia Young.  FA Date:  February 11, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.  

405.4  Pea Break  5.5 R  This route leads to the top of the highest pinnacle in a group of four pinnacles which together, are called The Rest Stop.  The group is 60 feet above (north of) the High Peaks Trail just beyond the turn-off point for The Unmentionable (It is about halfway from parking to The High Peaks and is frequented by hikers and scramblers).  The tallest pinnacle is on the northeast side of the group.  Climb the short right edge of its southwest side (starting in a corridor between it and the second highest pinnacle in the group).  The rock on this route is very clean and hard.  It is possible to get a so-so 1 ½ inch cam in a horizontal crack halfway up.  There is no summit anchor (downclimb or use a pinnacles rappel).  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Dates:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery and solo ascents of route by Robert Behrens and self, March 13, 2011.

407.2  Fifi Wears Lycra  5.9 *  Start in a deep, 25-foot high water chute 40 feet up and right of Poodle With a Mohawk.  Three bolts protect climbing to a ledge at the top of the chute.  A bolt above protects moves right, to the start of a steep, up-and-right groove.  Climb this past two bolts and two fixed pitons.  Continue past the route’s seventh bolt up and left to a slab.  Finish up and right past an eighth bolt to a two-bolt anchor on a headwall.  Rappel 70 feet. FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, Mark Fletcher, Jon McConachie, Kurt Schab, Sonja Raub.  FA Date:  April 7, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

409.5  Pet Rock Syndrome  5.10a *  This long climb is hard to place in order on this list.  It is above and behind (southwest of) Voyeur Wall, but east of The High Peaks’ formations Ridge Crest and Fels Rocks (Shades of Jade is located on the second of these).  It is placed on the list here due to the way it is approached, by way of a chimney system that leads through Pinch or Lynch Wall.  Get to this chimney by hiking to the base of Pinch or Lynch Wall, 30 feet left of the route Pinched and Lynched.  Start the chimney with six feet of fourth class stemming.  This leads to easy upward movement into the feature’s left branch.  Emerge from this chimney into a large hanging meadow.  Move gently uphill in the meadow (west), staying near its bottom edge.  At a high point below tall north-facing slabs (which are up and left) move downhill just out from the slab and then up and left into a shallow alcove near the north-facing slab’s right/west side.  Pet Rock Syndrome starts here.  Nine bolts lead up this slab, and over a headwall 140 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  The first bolt is 20 feet up, and the crux of the route comes before the fourth bolt.  Walk off right (west) and around.  The upper half of this route is on well featured, amazingly solid rock.  By way of further information, the top anchor of Pet Rock syndrome is 150 feet northeast of Ridge Crest Rock’s north toe and it is possible to approach the route from the High Peaks, along Ridge Crest Rock’s north side, and then down and around to the base.  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  March 2017.  Source(s):  Posting by Elkins to Mud’nCrud thread “Pinnacles Climbing: 30 Years and Counting,” March 21, 2017; ascent of route with Mr Mud and Elkins, February 25, 2018.

410.21  Rug Burn  5.11b **  Rug Burn is one of several routes on a previously undeveloped cliff called Voyeur Wall.
Voyeur Wall:   Voyeur Wall is a tall, north-facing cliff located 50 feet above the High Peaks Trail near Sew What Needles.  It was named after the dramatic and easy view that passing hikers have of climbers on its routes.  Find Voyeur by hiking toward the High Peaks on the High Peaks Trail.  Voyeur Wall is on the left (south) just before the man-made tunnel above Sew What Needles.  A short use-trail leads directly to the base of the cliff. Voyeur Wall is unusual in that it has an interesting pattern of up-and-left seams, cracks and ramps that are very visible from the use-trail.  The route Sticky Monkey (listed below) is also very visible from this use-trail; it is up and slightly to the right.  
This Route:  Rug Burn is well right of the blunt arete/outside corner that makes up Voyeur’s left edge.  Start 20 feet left of easy-to-find Cutting the Rug (listed next). Sustained climbing through five bolts is followed by a brief rest, and then sustained, wide, overhanging stemming. The difficulties ease off right at the top. Ten bolts in 70 feet to a two-bolt anchor which is shared with Cutting the Rug. FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  July 6, 2019.  Source(s):  Inspection of the route over several visits, report of completed first ascent by Gavin Emmons on Mud’nCrud Forum, “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” posting, July 6, 2019.

410.22  Cutting the Rug  5.11a **  Cutting the Rug is located 20 feet right of Rug Burn, and 45 feet left (east) of O.C.D.  Overdrive (listed next).  It starts on an easy looking, up-and-left ramp, left of a large left-facing corner (the ramp climbs harder than it looks).  The ramp leads to a headwall that also looks easy (but also isn’t).  Eight bolts lead 70 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  November 30, 2015.  Source(s):  Several conversations about the route with Emmons, Mr Mud and others; rappel over route (down from the second pitch of O.C.D. Overdrive) for bolt count and description, April 25, 2016.  

410.24  O.C.D. Overdrive  5.8 *  This two-pitch route climbs to the top of Voyeur Wall (and to a nice, viewful summit).  The first pitch is very good.  
Pitch One 5.8 (98 feet, eight bolts and gear):  Start left of the approach trail.  Move up 15 feet to a bolt and then up-and-right to a second bolt.  Continue up past six more bolts and gear to a two-bolt, hanging belay.  Pro: two each 3/4 and 3½ inches.
Pitch Two 5.6 (100 feet, three bolts and one piece of gear):  Easy fifth class leads 25 feet to a bolt to the right of a small tree.  Another bolt 12 feet higher leads to the base of a squeeze chimney (use a 3½ inch piece here).  Continue to the top of the 25 foot high, unprotected squeeze chimney.  Step left into a short water streak and a third bolt 15 feet further up.  This bolt protects moves up a slab.  Easier ground leads to the summit and a two-bolt anchor.
Descent:  Rappel down and left in a deep chute to the Cutting the Rug top anchor.  Note that this anchor is hard to see from above; it is below a bulge, 90 feet down.  A second, 65 foot rappel leads to the ground.
FA Party:  Noal Elkins, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, John Cook, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  February 6, 2016.  Source(s):  Several conversations about the route with Emmons, Mr Mud and others; ascent of route with John Cook, April 25, 2016.

410.26  Sticky Monkey  5.11b ***  Sticky Monkey starts 45 feet right of O.C.D. Overdrive, just right of the approach trail.  Climb past one bolt, then over an up-and-left crack to a second bolt.  Five more bolts lead over a steep, clean bulge to a two-bolt anchor 65 feet up, near the top of an up-and-left ramp.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Noal Elkins, Dennis Erik Mr Mud.  FA Date:  March 4, 2016.  Source(s):  Several conversations about the route with Emmons, Mr Mud and others; inspection of route from base April 25, 2016.

410.28  The Peep Hole  5.6  The Voyeur Wall feature called The Peep Hole is located just right of Sticky Monkey.  It is a deep chimney which starts above a 15 foot high water streak.  The route The Peep Hole gains the chimney by way of 5.6 face climbing to the right of the streak, past one bolt.  Three more bolts protect a total of 85 feet of climbing and one more crux (at the end) to a two-bolt anchor at the top/end of the chimney (the anchor can be seen from the ground).  FA Party: Gavin Emmons, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  March, 2017.  Source(s):  Discussion about the route with Gavin Emmons on May 2, 2017 followed by an ascent of it with him and Alacia Welch.

410.283  Peep Show  5.10c **  Peep Show and Lichen the View (listed next) start out of The Peep Hole chimney.  Both routes climb the chimney’s left (east) wall.  Of the two, Peep Show begins further out (closer to the chimney’s entrance).  Start its first pitch below bolts in a very shallow water chute, stemming as high as possible before committing to the face (note that, unlike the first bolt on Lichen the View, Peep Show’s first bolt is too high to use when climbing The Peep Hole).  The face becomes a shallow slot and then a lower-angle ramp.  Finish after eight bolts on a spacious and viewful ledge, 60 feet from the start.  Pitch two starts to the left.  Two bolts protect moves onto a shoulder.  Two more bolts protect climbing to an easy-to-see, up-and-left crack/flare.  Follow this left, using small to 2½ inch gear and two more bolts for protection.  The crack/flare ends at a broad ledge.  Continue left past a seventh bolt to an eighth, before moving up and right to a two-bolt anchor 85 feet from the start of the pitch.  Descend by way of two rappels (75 feet to the top of the first pitch and 85 feet to the ground).  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  May 12, 2019.  Source(s):  Ascent of route with Emmons, May 14, 2019.

410.285  Lichen the View  5.11b *  Start 12 feet right (further into the chimney) from Peep Show, just below The Peep Hole’s third bolt (which is this route’s first bolt).  Wide stemming leads to thin face climbing to a left-facing corner.  The corner becomes a low-angle ramp 35 feet from the start.  The route is protected by eight bolts and gear from small to one inch.  Finish after 65 feet at a two-bolt anchor (located six feet west of Peep Show’s second pitch).  Rappel from this anchor 95 feet to the ground.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Alacia Welch, Kris Vanesky.  FA Date:  May 12, 2019.  Source(s):  Description of route from Emmons while in The Peep Hole chimney and on the route Peep Show on May 14, 2019.

410.9  Sew What Slot  5.8  This route begins directly from the High Peaks Trail (and therefore should only be climbed on non-holiday weekdays).  The start is easy to find; when hiking up the High Peaks Trail, pass through the tunnel near the Sew What Needles.  Climb the second chimney on the left/uphill side of the trail, the one that is 35 feet from the end of the tunnel (the chimney might also be called a very deep water chute).  Forty feet of class four leads to a three foot high, oblong chockstone.  Move to its right where an easy class five slab/chimney leads to the bottom of a true chimney.  Climb this another 35 feet to the crux of the climb, a somewhat loose, 10 foot section of offwidth/squeeze chimney.  Ten more feet of slab then lead to a summit and a two-bolt anchor 110 feet from the start of the climb (there is also an old, third bolt on the summit; it was left in place for its historical value).   Gear: Two each one to six inches.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Description of the found top anchor from Dennis Erik Mr Mud by phone, November 2015; sighting from way above of the old slings on that top anchor, and subsequent approach almost to them from above, January 2016; ascent of the route (and replacement of the route’s top anchor) with John Cook, April 25, 2016.

417.1  Clinker  5.10b R *  Clinker climbs an independent pinnacle located 400 feet directly above (west of) Sew What Needles and 100 feet out from the base of Lower Scout Peak Bluff.  Although it is hard to see from below, this pinnacle is only 350 feet above the High Peaks Trail.  The easiest approach is from that trail; exit to the left (uphill) about 150 feet past the last tiny switchback near Sew What Needles (the switchback that turns to the right).  Move 30 feet into a brushy gap between big slabs to 20 feet of class three.  The class three exits onto grassy slopes which lead (steep uphill) to the base of the pinnacle’s north side.   Once there look for a belay bolt at the base of the climb (it’s in a hole and is critical in getting to the first bolt safely).  Six bolts start up that side before wrapping around to the east and then summiting.  The run-out between the fifth and sixth bolts justifies the “R” rating.  There is a two-bolt anchor on top, 60 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  December, 2015.  Source(s):  Posting about the route to Mud'nCrud Forum: “Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the ‘07 Guidebook),” January 3, 2016;  multiple conversations about the route with both Mr Mud and Cochran; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons on May 1, 2017.

417.8  The Barge  5.1  The Barge is a large, independent pinnacle located 250 feet north of the pinnacle on which the route Clinker is located.  Of the two formations, Clinker is out/east from Lower Scout Peak Bluff’s south end and The Barge is out/east from its north end.  The Barge is steep to overhanging and somewhat rotten on its north, east and south sides; its west/uphill side presents the only weakness. Climb a low-angle arete 25 feet into tree branches (tie these off for the route’s only protection).  Move through the branches into a small, flat area.  A class four slab leads to the summit and a two-bolt anchor 65 feet from the start.  Descend by way of a 70 foot rappel off the southwest side.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, David Knopp, Russ Pasley.  FA Date:  March 5, 2018.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

417.9  The Clipper  5.4  The Clipper is an independent pinnacle on the same hillside as, but 150 feet north of The Barge (there is a much smaller, multi-summited pinnacle between the two).  The Clipper is much bigger than The Barge but otherwise similar, with steep and rotten south and east sides and a more accessible uphill/west side.  Climb a nearly-horizontal, class three, mossy, rock ridge on that west side, toward a series of west-to-east oriented summits.  Pass and sling two sharp bumps.  Reach the first (and highest) summit and the route’s first bolt after 75 feet.  Descend east to a flat, grassy area (finishing with 10 feet of 5.4 downclimbing).  Easy movement leads to a second summit and a second bolt, 30 feet from the first.  Move down 20 feet to another flat area (the last eight feet are 5.3).  Continue to the third and last summit, 135 feet from the start.  Return 15 feet to a two-bolt anchor on the northeast side of the second summit.  Rappel off the north side, 60 feet to the ground.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  March 15, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

432.1  The Raven - North Side  5.10c  Included here for its historical value, this 15-foot boulder problem on Raven’s uphill side leads directly to the top anchor.  The 1966 guidebook called the route “5.9” at a time when 5.9 was literally the hardest grade in American climbing. FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Route is briefly mentioned in the Steve Roper 1966 guidebook; follow-up on this entry (climbing the route) with Brian Hamilton and Caleb Rightmeyer on April 6, 2019.

448.4  From Dawn to Tusk  5.10a *  From Dawn to Tusk and the following route, Hungry, Hungry Hippo are both on a separate rock face that is behind the pillar climbed by the second pitch of Lightning Bolt Crack.  Like Lightning Bolt Crack, these climbs face northeast.  Approach the base of Hungry, Hungry Hippo and From Dawn to Tusk by walking to the right and uphill from the base of Lightning Bolt Crack.  From Dawn to Tusk starts in a chimney/slot 50 feet to the left of the start of Hungry, Hungry Hippo.  Move into this slot and then down a little to a stance at a small, separate pillar.  Five bolts protect slab climbing in a water streak (the third bolt is on a large lodestone on the left, it faces toward a climbers rear-end and is hard to notice while leading). After this water streak the route nearly joins Hungry, Hungry Hippo at a flat “shoulder” of rock.  Continue up a streak past four more bolts, gear placements and the route crux.  Shares a two-bolt top anchor with Hungry, Hungry Hippo.  The route is 160 feet long.  Nine bolts total, and a few one to two inch cams (especially a brown Tri-Cam)  FA Party:  Jeff Lane, Robert Behrens, Josh Mucci, John Godar, Marc S.  FA Date:  Bolt installation finished April 10, 2010, first ascent May 2, 2010. Source(s):  Mud’nCrud Forum, “Pinns - 3/16/08 TR,” also, telephone discussion with Jeff Lane April 12, 2010, and ascent of route by Brad Young right after its first ascent.

448.5  Hungry, Hungry Hippo  5.9 R *  Located on a northeast facing rock face which is directly behind the pillar on which the second pitch of Lighting Bolt Crack is located.  Start at the base of a north-facing slab (the main wall here faces northeast).  Climb a mossy chute/groove in the middle of this face to a low angle “shoulder” of rock. A few 5.7 moves lead to the first bolt. Three more bolts lead to a two bolt (and chain) anchor.  It is 130 feet from this anchor back to the start of the route. FA Party:  Jeff Lane, Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  March 16, 2008.  Source(s):  Mud’nCrud Forum, “Pinns - 3-16-08 TR,” ascent of route by Brad Young, May 2, 2010.

452.3 Donna Gee  5.8 R This route is located on Don Genaro slab, to the right of the 5.10a route there. Start in the same location as for the 5.10a route, but climb straight up to a narrow ledge 20 feet from the start. Cams here protect moves right and then up onto a ledge. Clip a bolt from this ledge (the original, very poorly placed, 1/4" compression bolt was replaced with a long 3/8" stainless steel bolt on February 7, 2011 by Joel Primrose). From the bolt, move right to a left-facing corner. This leads quickly to a notch which allows an exit up and right. Belay (using body position) on the other side of a rock ridge. Walk off up a gully. Pro: one set of cams from 1/2 inch to four inches, plus two additional two inch cams. FA Party: Unknown. FA Date: Unknown. Source(s): Discovery and rebolting of route February, 2011; ascent of route, April 9, 2011.

454.9 The Royal Flush 5.10b **  This route is on Casino Rock. It starts left of Crap Chute in a steep and prominent water chute (this feature is shown on the topo in the book on page 181). Fifteen feet up the chute is a fixed pin on the right. Above that, medium cams can be placed in holes  leading up to the first bolt (take a few 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inch pieces).  A steep bulge (5.9) through pockets gains the second bolt. Three more bolts lead to the route crux, a difficult, but well protected bulge (5.10b). The chute becomes low angle above the crux, quickly dropping the climbing to class four. Continue to belay at trees at the top of the chute. Walk off. All bolts were placed with hooks and are 3/8 inch by 3 inch. This route is definitely one of the best in Condor Gulch. FA Party: Fabrizio Bittner, Josh Mucci. FA Date: March 17, 2010. Source(s): Emails and photos by Josh Mucci, March 18, 2010; ascent of route by Brad Young and Jim Lundeen, March 21, 2010. This is a link to a copy of the topo from page 181 of the book. It has been modified to show The Royal Flush

457.8  Blackjack  5.9  This route is on Casino Rock, 200 feet right of High Stakes Breaks. Start in an obvious, dark, water streak (the streak can be seen in the photo on page 180 of the guidebook). Climb in the water streak (5.7 and 5.8, with some wild stemming) which takes some good gear to just below a bolt which is 60 feet off the ground. Move right onto a loose shelf from which the bolt can be clipped. A well protected, but intimidating 5.9 mantle/bulge leads to easy climbing and then to very easy climbing. Pass under a large chockstone before reaching a tree (belay here). Walk off. Pro: Very small to four inch (the four inch piece is critical), including extra one and two inch. The one bolt was placed with aid. It is a stainless steel, 3/8 inch Rawl. FA Party: Fabrizio Bittner, Josh Mucci. FA Date: November 9, 2009. Source(s): Email describing route from Josh Mucci; also, Brad Young ascent of route, March 21, 2010.

459.3  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Middle Chute  5.1 R  Climb the middle chute to the top.  Poor quality one-half to one inch gear can be attempted partway up.  Move right to the two-bolt summit anchor to belay.   FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown. Source(s):  Field research, discovery and ascent of route on April 9, 2019; further checking and comment by John Cook shortly thereafter.

459.5  Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Right Chute  5.2 R  Start up the middle chute but veer right into a faint and very shallow chute that leads directly to the summit anchor.  One and three inch gear can be used in a horizontal crack a third of the way up.   FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown. Source(s):  Field research, discovery and ascent of route on April 9, 2019; further checking and comment by John Cook shortly thereafter.

459.7 Casino Rock’s Summit Ridge - Northeast Pillar  5.6 R  This short route leads to the top of the summit ridge’s separate northeast pillar.  Climb the right side of the pillar’s southeast face aiming for a shallow notch that allows access to the summit.  There is a two-bolt anchor on top, 25 feet from the start.   FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown. Source(s):  Field research, discovery and ascent of route on April 9, 2019; further checking and comment by John Cook shortly thereafter.

461.2  Doodlin’ Dody - Northeast Pinnacle  5.8  Climb the 45-foot high right side of this pinnacle’s west face.  Two protection bolts lead to a spacious summit and a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Brad Young, Kathy Cook, Mark Felthauser.  FA Date:  April 30, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

462.5  Uber the Goober  5.7 R  Start this 135-foot-long route at Forgotten Sister’s bottom left edge.  Very easy class five leads up and right, 30 feet to a bolt.  Move over a bulge (5.3) to more very easy class five, continuing to a second bolt, 45 feet above the first.  Move up and right toward a chute 10 feet to a third bolt (which is also the third bolt on Initiation Fees, listed next).  Finish on that route, climbing past its fourth bolt to its summit.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Robert Behrens, Jeff Lane.  FA Date:  April 28, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

462.6  Initiation Fees  5.8 R*  This route is on a tall, northwest facing slab called The Forgotten Sister (named because it bears a strong resemblance to The First Sister).  The Forgotten Sister is northwest of, and right below, The Peanuts.  Although it cannot be seen from the trail, the whole Forgotten Sister can be seen well from Jamcrack Rock.  Note also, many pinnacles and sub-pinnacles dominate the area to the right/south of this slab, extending all the way to Doodlin’ Dody.  Approach by walking from the Condor Gulch Trail around to the north of The Peanuts and then down along the base of the formation.  Initiation Fees climbs the most prominent chute in the middle of the face.  A fixed piton (painted yellow) very low protects climbing to the first bolt. A second bolt is up and left. This is followed by a long but easier section which is protected using a 1 1/2 inch cam in a pocket. Two bolts protect the rest of the route (including one right at the exit from the chute). Although there isn't a lot of protection on this climb, what there is is fairly evenly spaced and the run-outs are within reason. It is 165 feet to the top of the sub-pinnacle which makes up the top of The Forgotten Sister.  There is no summit anchor; an excellent body position belay is easily arranged (and an easy-to-arrange Pinnacles rappel is necessary to descend about 20 feet to the ground behind the top of Forgotten Sister). FA Party:  John Godar, Josh Mucci. FA Date:  March 27, 2011. Source(s):  Posting to Mud'nCrud Forum, “Initiation Fees,” March 28, 2011; subsequent emails with the first ascent authors; ascent of route, April 9, 2011. Click on this link for a Forgotten Sister photo/topo prepared by John Godar.

462.8  Chute the Moon  5.6 *  Chute the Moon, like Initiation Fees, is on the Forgotten Sister.  It climbs a crack/left facing corner on the far right side of the formation.  The crack/corner continues 60 feet before turning into a wide chimney.  From this point, stay left of the chimney in a clean, easy, but unprotected water chute.  This chute quickly becomes class four.  Continue to a two-bolt anchor on the left, 170 feet from the start (the last 30 feet are class three).  Walk off.  Gear: small to one four inch piece.  FA Party:  John and Sue Godar.  FA Date:  March, 2010.  Source(s):  Phone discussions with and emails from Josh Mucci and John Godar; photo-topo from John Godar; ascent of route, February, 2011. Click on this link for a Forgotten Sister photo/topo prepared by John Godar.


  
HIGH PEAKS

468.11  Up the Buttress  5.10a ***  This excellent route is located on Fels Rock, a separate formation located 50 feet northeast of the northeast end of Beak Peak.  Up the Buttress has a lot of really good rock in 105 feet.  It starts in the deep corridor between Fels’ northeast corner and the south end of Sunshine Pinnacle (on which is Dreaming of Sunshine, listed below).  Reach this start point by walking around to the corridor’s north end and moving up it 65 feet.  Begin climbing ten feet below a separate crack/squeeze chimney on Fels’ north side.  The route’s first bolt is eight feet up and easy to see.  The second bolt is directly left (consider reaching back to unclip the first bolt after clipping the second).  A third bolt protects moves into the crack/squeeze chimney.  Climb this to its top (gear from three to five inches).  A fourth bolt above protects moves straight left, around the buttress, to the fifth bolt (consider unclipping the fourth bolt after clipping the fifth).  Continue up the buttress past three more bolts to a slight shoulder (eight lead bolts total).  Twenty five feet of easy but unprotected climbing leads to a sub-summit and a two-bolt anchor (shared with Shades of Jade, listed next).  Great care is needed on this route to avoid rope drag; consider using multiple runners in addition to back-unclipping as described above.  FA Party:  Noal Elkins, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Tobias Unknown.  FA Date:  May 15, 2016.  Source(s):  May 16, 2016 post by Dennis Erik Mr Mud to Mud’nCrud thread “Hope Everyone Has a Good Weekend;” multiple correspondence from Noel Elkins, early December, 2019; toprope solo ascent of route on December 13, 2019 (not clean).

468.13  Shades of Jade  5.8 ***   Shades of Jade is to the right of Up the Buttress, in the left-middle of Fels Rock’s northwest face (the side that faces Humping Lizards Formation).  Look for an easy but mossy ramp near the lowest left edge of that face (it isn't possible to go any further left than this edge; the corridor between Fels and Sunshine Pinnacle stops leftward progress). Climb a mossy ramp 25 feet to the first bolt (optional gear to two inches in the middle of the ramp).  Two more bolts lead up and slightly right to a headwall.  Traverse right to the top of a mini-buttress.  Three more bolts (six lead bolts total) protect climbing to a sub-summit and a two-bolt anchor 75 feet up.  This route also has a lot of really good rock.  Its steep crux is after the fifth bolt.  It is possible to sling knobs for additional protection above the sixth bolt.  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  December 26, 2015.  Source(s):  Description of the route from John Cook (through Noal Elkins); ascent of route with Brian Hamilton and Whitney Reynier, January 2, 2016.

468.2  Dreaming of Sunshine  5.11b A0  This route is on Sunshine Pinnacle, which is located just northeast/downhill from Fels Rock (the two are separated by a narrow gully; note that Sunshine Pinnacle is significantly smaller and shorter than Fels Rock).  Dreaming of Sunshine starts on Sunshine Pinnacle’s northwest edge, 60 feet down (north) from the top of the gully that separates the two formations.  Move 20 feet up and left on a ramp to the first bolt.  Continue more or less straight up on a bolt protected face.  Getting to the fifth bolt requires 5.11b climbing; after that A0 moves (pulling on quick draws) interspersed with more free climbing leads to the top.  Nine bolts protect 80 feet of climbing to a two-bolt anchor.  (Note: do not mistake the abandoned project on this formation’s southwest side - facing Fels Rock and Shades of Jade - for this route).  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  May, 2016.  Source(s):  Mud'nCrud Forum thread: “Hope everyone has a good weekend,” posting of May 30, 2016, by Dennis Erik Mr Mud; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons on May 1, 2017.

468.3  Jeepers  5.11b  Jeepers is on the southeast side of the Humping Lizards formation (it faces directly at Fels Rock/Shades of Jade 250 feet away, although trees make it hard to see one from the other).  This side of Humping Lizards makes up part of a significant northeast-to-southwest oriented cliff that runs downhill, to a point below Lower Scout Peak Bluff.  This cliff makes up the north side of the steep, 80 to 100 foot wide gully that separates Sunshine Pinnacle and Fels Rock from Lower Scout Peak Bluff and the Humping Lizards formation (it also prevents easy access from Jeepers to the route Humping Lizards, which starts on the opposite side of the formation).  Jeepers starts in a right-facing corner 150 feet up-gully from the route Dreaming of Sunshine.  Eight bolts protect balancy climbing to a crux headwall (loose).  End at a two-bolt anchor on top of a north-south oriented shoulder 85 feet from the start (this anchor is located 10 feet out from/north of the first bolt on the route Humping Lizards).  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.   FA Date:  April, 2017.  Source(s):  Thread on Mud'nCrud Forum, “Jeepers” started just after the route’s first ascent; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons on May 1, 2017.

468.41 Humping Lizards  5.7 R  This route is located on the east (downhill) arete of a large pinnacle which is located slightly south of the south end of Middle Scout Peak Bluff. The top of this pinnacle is just east of Scout Peak (its west/uphill side is just visible between two small pinnacles from near Scout Peak, but it doesn't look very big from there). Humping Lizards starts on the north side of the pinnacle, just uphill from its lowest point. Easy fifth class leads up and slightly left 25 feet to a prominent hump low on the arete. A bolt on this first hump can be used as a belay anchor, or as a first protection point (the first ascent party belayed here without the bolt which was added later with their permission). Move from this bolt to a crack on the north side of the arete (gear from one half to three inches). Continue around a bush to a second bolt. A third bolt protects moves to a second prominent hump (80 feet from the route's start) and a two-bolt belay (without this intermediate belay, rope drag is terrible). Two additional bolts protect 85 more feet of climbing directly on the arete to the summit and an additional two bolt anchor. Descend by making a 25 foot rappel off the back (southwest) side of the formation. (Note that the first bolt on the first pitch and both bolts on the second pitch were added to this route with the permission of the first ascent authors, after the first ascent ).  FA party: Noal Elkins and Dennis Erik Mr Mud. FA date: November 28, 2015. Source(s): Photos and a description of the route by email from John Cook, December 8, 2015; partial ascent of the route (and addition of current first bolt to it) with John Cook; watched John and Kathy Cook make a complete ascent (and make the other bolt additions, while climbing nearby).

468.5 Katwalk 5.6  Katwalk is on Middle Scout Peak Bluff, which is below (east) of the approach trail between the southern High Peaks trail junction at the outhouse and Scout Peak and Beak Peak.
Scout Peak Bluffs: The Scout Peak Bluffs are three significant cliffs, each of which faces due east. Upper Scout Peak Bluff is the 40 to 60 foot high cliff which is immediately east and northeast of Scout Peak. It's south end is just below Scout Peak - Regular Route. The easiest approach to Scout Peak is made along the top of this cliff. Middle Scout Peak Bluff is lower than, and about 50 feet east of the upper cliff. This middle cliff is about 300 feet wide and varies in height from around 60 feet (on its left side) to about 120 feet (near its right side). Lower Scout Peak Bluff is also tall and wide; it's top is located 100 to 150 feet out from the base of the middle cliff.
Middle Scout Peak Bluff:  Approach the base of Middle Scout Peak Bluff by using the Scout Peak climber's approach trail (south from the outhouse, slightly uphill, staying mostly on rock, just left/east of the ridge top). Where the Scout Peak trail makes a short right (west) turn, and before Scout Peak has come into view, stay straight and level, now below/east of Upper Scout Peak Bluff. After about 100 feet descend a fairly steep gully located between the south end of Middle Scout Peak Bluff (climber's left) and a large pinnacle that is due east of Scout Peak (the route Humping Lizards is on the downhill/east side of this large pinnacle).
Finding Katwalk: Katwalk is located left-of-center on Scout Peak Bluff, about 200 feet north of the descent gully and about 300 feet south of the Scout Peak outhouse. The base of the climb is at about the same elevation as the outhouse (but the outhouse can't be seen from the base of the climb, go 50 feet out from the base and it becomes visible). Katwalk ends at the lowest of three pines (the pines are especially visible from the approach and can also be seen when standing out from the base of the cliff).
Climbing Katwalk: Start at the base of a low-angle, right-facing corner. Move up about 10 feet to a big lodestone (a six inch piece is needed here). Continue up the corner (a three inch piece provides very good pro) to a short groove and then the route's first bolt, 35 feet up. Follow the groove to a second bolt below a roof (use a long runner). Move right and around the roof to a third bolt.  Continue straight up past a fourth bolt and an easy runout to the top.  Belay from two bolts.  Descend by scrambling up and then off (the Scout Peak approach trail is only 50 feet above the anchor). FA party: John Cook, Kathy Cook, Bob Walton. FA date: December 5, 2015. Source(s): Email about the route from John Cook, December 7, 2015; ascent of the route with Katie Young on December 18, 2015.

468.7  Five Aces  5.8 *  Five Aces is located 300 feet right/north of Katwalk and 300 feet southeast (left/downhill) from the outhouse.  It is easy to approach from the outhouse; move downhill/south to and then past the lowest toe of the cliff (passing below the routes Can You Spare a Square? and Swing to the Right - both listed below).  Look for a right-facing corner below a tall, gray water streak.  A fixed piton in the corner protects moves to the first bolt, 10 feet off the ground.  Use a six inch piece getting to the second bolt and then step left to a ledge.  Seven more bolts lead to a small, grassy alcove.  The streak becomes an up-and right chute.  Follow this past one more bolt (10 lead bolts total) to a slab and then a two-bolt anchor at the top of the cliff, 135 feet from the start.  Walk off right.  FA Party:  Brad Young, David Knopp, Russ Pasley.  FA Date:  March 20, 2017.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

468.8 Swing to the Right  5.6  Swing to the Right is located on Middle Scout Peak Bluff, just under 125 yards right/north of Katwalk, and 250 feet southeast (downhill) from the outhouse. Approach directly from the outhouse by moving downhill/south to the lowest toe of the cliff. The route starts on top of a 10 foot high, class three slab, 15 feet up and left of that toe. The route's first bolt protects crux moves over a bulge. Two more bolts protect climbing to an up-and-right groove/ramp. A fourth bolt protects the beginning of the ramp. Runout but easy climbing then follows, up and right to a ledge system and a two-bolt anchor, 90 feet from the start. Rappel 65 feet to sloped ground up and right of the route's start. FA party: John Cook, Kathy Cook, Brad Young. FA date: March 12, 2018. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

468.9 Can You Spare a Square? 5.3 This route starts well up and right from the start of Swing to the Right, at the same elevation as that route's top anchor. This start point is 80 feet left and down from the outhouse. Begin with a 50 foot, class three, leftward traverse on a ledge (directly toward the Swing to the Right anchor). Move up slightly to the base of a bulge at a slight water-streak and the route's first bolt. Continue up the slight streak past two more bolts to the top of the cliff. There is no top anchor, but a good body-position belay can be made 100 feet from the start and an even better one exists 10 feet higher. FA party: John Cook, Kathy Cook. FA date: March 18, 2018. Source(s): Written route description from John Cook given December 30, 2018; ascent of route with Caitlyn Rich and Bob Walton, December 31, 2018.

471.2  Apostrophe  5.3 R  This route is located on Punctuation Pinnacle.  It parallels and then joins route 471 (to be called “Arete Route” in the next guidebook edition).  Start Apostrophe eight feet right (north) of Arete Route, on a wide, class three-to-four ramp.  Climb 40 feet (multiple sling knobs) to a bolt on the left.  The route crux follows, moving left/up onto Arete Route.  Finish up that route’s crux bulge to a two-bolt top anchor.  Rappel off Punctuation’s south side, 60 feet to the ground.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 14, 2019.  Source(s):  Report of the route by John Cook, in camp, the evening after the first ascent; ascent of route with him on May 15, 2019.

471.6  Dangling Participle  5.9  This 60-foot route begins on the north face of Punctuation Pinnacle, 80 feet downslope/west of Apostrophe.  The first bolt is easily visible 10 feet off the ground.  Four bolts protect committing climbing to a two-bolt anchor on the pinnacle’s summit ridge (this anchor is 20 feet above/east of the top anchor of Andy’s Sunset).  The route’s crux is getting past the first bolt.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  October 3, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons October 6, 2019; ascent of route with Laura Dawson, October 20, 2019.

472.4 Elf Pinnacle 5.6  As described below, Elf and Pulaski Pinnacles are large formations between Punctuation and Axe Pinnacles. Both have short uphill sides.
Elf and Pulaski Pinnacles: Both of these long, spread-out pinnacles have distinct summits that are on a line between the summits of Punctuation and Axe Pinnacles. Elf's summit is lower than and 175 feet northwest from the summit of Punctuation. Pulaski's summit is lower than and 50 feet north from the summit of Elf. Pulaski looms high above Axe, its close neighbor to the north. All four pinnacles can be seen from the Juniper Canyon Trail, a few hundred feet before reaching the Scout Peak junction.
This Route:  The only easy way up Elf is also the shortest. From a point between Punctuation and Possibility Pinnacles, walk down and then north, across slabs and onto a large, fairly level shoulder on Elf's east/uphill side. The way to the top is obvious from here; a 15 foot boulder problem leads to a narrow summit. Descend by a Pinnacles rappel. Although this route is short and unprotected, a large lodestone which points away from the climb can be slung to secure a belayer; the belayer can then keep a climber from a long, bouncing fall off the side of the shoulder. FA Party: Brad Young, Mark Fletcher, John Cook, and Kathy Cook. FA Date: December 28, 2016. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

472.5 Pulaski Pinnacle 5.1 R  There are two ways to move into a gully/slot on the southeast side of Pulaski Pinnacle (the side facing Elf): make a short descent from the shoulder east of Elf's summit (eight feet of class four at the end), or, walk up the gully/slot from the west (from toward Goat Rock). A short, easy fifth class groove in the middle of this face leads to class three and then to a saddle at the top of the pinnacle. The summit is to the left (west). Follow a narrow ridge of rock to a  second (and more exposed) crux. This crux deposits a climber onto the summit where there is a two-bolt anchor. Descend by a 30 foot rappel back to the base. Although there is no protection on this route, a belay would help a leader at the second/upper crux, preventing a long fall off the Axe Pinnacle side of this formation. FA Party: Brad Young, Mark Fletcher, John Cook, and Kathy Cook. FA Date: December 28, 2016. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

478.7 Jingle Bell Rock 5.7 *  This route climbs the apron on the lower southeast side of Scout Peak, ending on the broad ledge where the routes South Face and Leonard-Horsfall start. Begin just right of the right-most streak. A bolt protects moves up and left into the streak. Climb past three more bolts to an up-and-right ramp which leads to the upper part of the water streak. Four more bolts protect climbing up to a hummock; pass this on the right to a two-bolt anchor, 90 feet from the start of the climb. Walk off right. FA Party: John and Kathy Cook. FA Date: December 27, 2016. Source(s): Description of the route from John Cook; ascent of the route with both Cooks, December 28, 2016.

480.3  Jean Louise  5.4  Jean Louise climbs The Mockingbirds’ west pinnacle on its south side (the side toward Scout Peak).  
The Mockingbirds:  The Mockingbirds are located directly below Scout Peak’s north face.  Although of significant size and height, they are dwarfed by Scout.  Two sub-formations are oriented uphill to downhill (east to west).  The top of the east (uphill) formation is accessible by 10 feet of class four on its north side.  The west/downhill formation has two summits (west and middle).  Both require technical climbing.  Approach by moving directly downhill from the start of Scout Peak - Regular Route.
This Route:  Start Jean Louise in a slot behind a left-facing “ear” of rock.  A fixed pin 10 feet up provides the first protection.  A short section of chimney leads to a second piton 10 feet above the first.  Continue up and right in a shallow trough 25 feet to the summit (use a 2½ inch piece for protection).  A two-bolt anchor allows a rappel back to the start. FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  November 19, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

480.5  Boo Radley  5.4  Boo Radley starts 20 feet up and right of Jean Louise.  Climb a 20-foot high, flared chimney (one fixed piton, slung knobs, tiny to small and, optionally, one four inch piece).  Continue, class three, from the top of the chimney 20 feet to The Mockingbirds’ middle summit.  There is no top anchor.  Descend by returning to the notch between the middle and west pinnacles and then climbing an eight-foot high face onto the west pinnacle’s summit with its two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  November 19, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

484.1  Across the Great Divide  5.4 *  This route ascends Ridge Crest Rock to the right of the formation’s original route (that route, number 484 in the 2007 guidebook, will now be called “Original Route”).  Start near a pine, 30 feet down and right from Original Route.  Climb a low-angle, exposed rib of rock 25 feet to a stance and the climb’s first bolt.  Continue up a slab, right of a big, right-facing corner, to a second bolt, then to and past sling knobs to a third bolt.  Move up and left onto Original Route, finishing up that, using so-so quality sling knobs, and/or the highest scrub oak for additional protection.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor on the flat, spacious top of the formation, 85 feet from the start.  Descend by rappelling the route.  The first half of Across the Great Divide has surprisingly good rock and nice exposure.  FA Party:  John and Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  November 13, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook, November 14, 2016; ascent of route with him on December 2, 2016.

484.5  Summit Experience  5.6  Summit Experience is a unique route; just getting to the base takes more effort than doing the climb.  The route climbs a separate 30 foot high pinnacle located just north of Lunch Top Rock.  Both the separate pinnacle and Lunch Top Rock are located at the top of the wide chasm/chimney that splits Pinch or Lynch Wall (the chasm/chimney with the huge chockstone).  The chasm/chimney, Lunch Top Rock and the separate pinnacle can all be seen when hiking toward the High Peaks on the High Peaks Trail. The separate pinnacle looks small and sits atop the middle of the chimney. Lunch Top Rock makes up the chimney’s left, top edge (by way of further information, the top of Lunch Top Rock sits 25 feet higher and just north from the two-bolt top anchor for the route Assault and Battery).  Approach Summit Experience from the east end of Ridge Crest Rock.  Large boulders about 100 feet due east of Ridge Crest provide a starting view-point. Lunch Top Rock, the two-bolt top anchor for Summit Experience and the 150 foot, class four/easy class five, brushy approach can all be seen from here (Lunch Top is on the right and flat-topped, the separate pinnacle is to its left, taller than Lunch Top and sitting by itself).  Approach to the top of a large, low boulder jammed between Lunch Top Rock and the separate pinnacle.  Start climbing in an up-and-right, two to four inch crack on the pinnacle’s south side (facing Lunch Top Rock).  This crack leads 15 feet to a shoulder of rock on its east side.  One bolt protects crux moves to another bolt and then a two-bolt summit anchor.  FA Party:  Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  March 26, 2016.  Source(s):  Conversation about the route with Mr Mud; follow-up email by him (with photos); ascent of route with John Cook and Aaron McDonald, April 24, 2016.

484.91 Silence Has a Right to Be Heard  5.3  This route and Black Sun in a White World (listed next) are on Pisa Pinnacle, a noticeably leaning, 25 foot tall spire located just over 200 feet northeast (uphill) of The Shaft (it is 350 feet south of Scout Peak).  Pisa Pinnacle is easy to approach from between Scout and Beak Peaks; walk gently downhill through light brush.  Silence Has a Right to Be Heard climbs the blunt east arete of the formation past one bolt.  A two-bolt summit anchor allows a rappel off the south side (although one bolt is in a cracked lodestone, both bolts are over three inches in length).  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 4, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Fletcher on December 12, 2016; ascent of route with Brian Hamilton on December 17, 2016.

484.92  Black Sun in a White World  5.4 R  Climb the west face of Pisa Pinnacle, starting on its left (north) side.  One bolt almost halfway up provides the only good protection; a crack above the bolt will take gear to one inch but the rock quality is bad.  FA Party:  Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 4, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Fletcher on December 12, 2016; ascent of route with Brian Hamilton on December 17, 2016.

485.2  Hoof It  5.8 *  This route is in a water streak on the southwest face of Nanny Goat Rock.  
Nanny Goat Rock:  Nanny Goat Rock is south of the southwest-most portion of Goat Rock (the two are separated by a 30 foot wide corridor).  Nanny Goat is a significant formation, but much smaller than Goat (Nanny Goat's “footprint” is perhaps 100 by 250 feet and its summit is about 200 feet taller than its lowest/downhill side).  The highest/uphill end of Nanny Goat is about 150 feet west, across almost flat ground, from the start of the normal Goat Rock descent corridor.  It is possible to summit Nanny Goat by way of an eight foot high section of class four on its uphill (southeast) end.  
This Route:  Hoof It climbs a streak on the southwest face of Nanny Goat.  The streak reaches the ground just left of a left-facing alcove, about 90 feet downhill from the uphill/right side of this southwest face.  Seven bolts protect fairly steep climbing in the streak to a headwall and an eighth bolt left of a hummock.  Move up and left over a headwall (big holds and great exposure) to a ninth bolt.  Increasingly easy moves lead to a two-bolt anchor, 90 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  December 22, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.  
 
485.3  Faun Pinnacle  Class Four  Faun Pinnacle is the only technical summit in the jumbled formations that define the right (southwest) side of the normal, walk-off descent from Goat Rock’s summit.  These formations are 20 to 30 feet southwest of Goat’s southwest edge (the low-angle dirt corridor between them and Goat is the Goat Rock descent).  They run about 200 feet from downhill (southeast) to uphill (northwest).  All except Faun can be summited, class two, from various sides.  The furthest rock downhill (closest to The Shaft) is Faun.  Start in a slot between it and the next formation uphill (at its start, this slot is about 10 feet wide).  Move up to the high point of dirt (where the slot is 30 inches wide).  Continue downhill, 15 feet, to a narrow slot/water chute on the left.  This class four chute leads 25 feet to a slab which leads up a few feet to a shoulder.  Move left (toward Goat Rock) to finish on an exposed class four slab which leads to the pinnacle’s summit.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Description of the route by phone from John Cook, November 14, 2016; ascent of route with Cook on December 2, 2016.

485.51  The Hedonist  5.3 R *  This two-pitch route is located on the far left (uphill) side of Goat Rock’s east face. The Southeast End of Goat Rock:  This route is located about 250 feet left (uphill/south) of the route Embraceable You.  It is left of the large gash/chimney that splits this side of Goat Rock (this gash is visible in the photo on page 195 of the 2007 guidebook; Satyr Pinnacle, described below, is also visible in the photo).  
This Route:  The Hedonist begins in the corridor between Goat Rock and Satyr Pinnacle.  Satyr Pinnacle is a separate formation which sits almost on the southeast corner of Goat Rock, just out from the left/uphill end of Goat Rock’s east face.  At their closest, Goat and Satyr are separated by a five foot wide corridor which has a very steep, leaf-filled floor.  Start climbing just left (south) of the top of this steep, narrow corridor.  A very shallow, low-angle chute leads up and a little right 20 feet to a bolt.  Move right into another chute and continue up to a second bolt.  Bolts three and four protect more climbing up the same chute.  After the fourth bolt move up and right next to a grassy area to a two-bolt anchor 90 feet from the start.  The second pitch is short and unprotected, but quite worthwhile.  From the anchor, walk 15 feet right (to the edge of the huge gash described above).  Climb an arete straight up 25 feet to the top of Goat.  Descend from the top of the route by way of the standard walk-off; this leads down and around (southwest, south, then east) to the base.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 26, 2016.  Source(s):   Email from Cook reporting the route October 15, 2016; ascent of route with Laura Rosensteel November 5, 2016.

485.54  Four Goats’ Sake  5.6 *  Four Goats’ Sake climbs the wide chimney that dominates the left side of Goat Rock’s large, east face.  Approach from the corridor between the Goat Rock route The Hedonist and Satyr Pinnacle (Satyr Pinnacle is described with the route Scapegoat below).  A narrowing, leaf-littered section of the corridor leads steeply down (north) to the base of the chimney.  Climb the face on the right past two bolts.  Bolts three through five protect climbing in the chimney.  Move right onto the face below a very big lodestone.  Five more bolts protect the rest of the route up the face to the right of the chimney.  Finish on a ledge at a two-bolt anchor (shared with Sheep Sheer).  Descend by scrambling a few feet to the summit and walking south to the main Goat Rock descent gully.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, John Cook, Kathy Cook, Alacia Welch.  FA Date:  July 4, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Gavin Emmons, July 5, 2019; many ascents of route by PCAD climbers, October 20, 2019.

485.55  Sheep Sheer  5.10b **  Sheep Sheer is located in the first water chute to the right of Four Goats’ Sake.  Approach down the narrow, leaf-littered corridor to and past the start of Four Goats’ Sake.  Continue another 20 feet to a section of slab that allows a 25-foot traverse north, above the still-descending corridor, past the bottom of Sheep Sheer’s water chute, to a two-bolt bottom anchor (a bottom anchor because the route starts well above ground level).  Climb the wide chute past nine bolts in 155 feet to a two-bolt anchor at a ledge.  The route has three bulges; the first is the crux and the next two require 5.9 and 5.10a climbing.  Walk off.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  March 16, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Gavin Emmons, July 5, 2019; many ascents of route by PCAD climbers, October 20, 2019.

485.56  Goat Riddance  5.10a **  Goat Riddance climbs the next chute right of Sheep Sheer.  By way of reference to the 2007 guidebook, this is two chutes left of Embraceable You, route number 486.  Because they start above a mossy, class three and four slab, Goat Riddance and its sister route Forgive And Forgoat both begin from a two-bolt bottom anchor.  This anchor can be reached from above or below (from below is, overall, easier).  From above, move down the Satyr/Goat corridor to the Sheep Sheer bottom anchor.  A class four chute-to-shelf leads down and right, 25 feet to the start-anchor for the two lower routes.  The other approach, from below, starts from the ridge top on the east side of Satyr Pinnacle.  Move north/downhill to the base of Goat Rock at the start of Embraceable You (note this route’s deeper water chute, and as a further landmark, the poison oak-choked, very bottom reaches of the corridor between Goat and Satyr, 125 feet up and left).  Seventy feet of class three and four lead up and left to a flat area with two small pines.  The bottom anchor bolts are behind the trees.  The route’s first bolt is easily visible up and left.  A total of 10 lead bolts protect 180 feet of climbing, including a crux bulge about halfway up and a second, easier bulge near the end.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor on a big ledge, 10 feet below the summit.  To descend, traverse 12 feet left to the Sheep Sheer anchor (easy but very exposed).  Scramble from there to Goat Rock’s summit and walk off.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, Alacia Welch.  FA Date:  May 6, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Gavin Emmons, July 5, 2019; rappel over, and inspection of, the route on October 30, 2019, while discussing it with Emmons and John Cook.

485.57  Forgive And Forgoat  5.10a **  Forgive And Forgoat climbs one chute right of Goat Riddance (which is one chute left of Embraceable You, route number 486 in the 2007 guidebook).  Start from the two-bolt bottom anchor shared with Goat Riddance.  Move slightly right into the water chute.  The route stays in the chute past 11 bolts.  The lower half includes three bulges of increasing difficulty (eight bolts in the first 95 feet).  The upper half is easier (three more bolts in 85 feet).  The last bolt is hard to see from below, it is above a final, low headwall.  Move left to finish at a two-bolt top anchor shared with Goat Riddance.  Descend as for that route.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons, John Cook.  FA Date:  June 13, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Gavin Emmons, July 5, 2019; ascent of route with Emmons, October 30, 2019.

485.81  Scapegoat  5.7  Scapegoat climbs 70 feet to the main summit of Satyr Pinnacle.
Satyr Pinnacle:  Satyr Pinnacle sits five to 20 feet out from the southeast corner of Goat Rock (Satyr can be seen in the photo on page 195 of the 2007 guidebook).  Satyr has several separate summits divided by noticeable north-south oriented gaps.  The tallest, main summit is the one closest to Goat Rock.  Three routes on this main summit are listed from left to right, starting with Scapegoat, which is directly below that summit.
This Route:  Scapegoat starts from the level part of the Satyr/Goat corridor, 20 feet across from the Goat Rock route The Hedonist.  Climb an up-and-left ramp 15 feet to a scoop and the route’s first bolt.  Continue up and left to an alcove and a second bolt.  Finish the ramp to a shoulder at the base of a headwall.  Stretch right to clip bolt three.  Climb the headwall to a ledge and a fourth bolt.  Finish onto the final section of the route Satyr (listed below).  Pass Satyr Pinnacle’s rappel anchor, continuing past a separate, two-bolt summit anchor to Satyr’s highest point.  Move back down to the rappel anchor to descend by rappel to the west (toward Goat Rock).  FA Party:  John Cook, Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  June 19, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook regarding the route on June 22, 2019; ascent of route with several climbers during 2019 PCAD event.

485.83  Gruff  5.9  Gruff and the route Satyr (listed next) start at the same place, on the left (west) side of Satyr’s south toe 30 feet right of Scapegoat.  For Gruff, look for a relatively deep water chute that doesn’t quite reach the ground.  One bolt protects moves into the chute (the route crux).  Three more bolts protect the rest of the chute.  Exit onto the route Satyr (listed next), finishing at its lower anchor.  FA Party:  John Cook, Laura Dawson, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date:  November 6, 2016.  Source(s):  Watched the route’s first two bolts being placed by Cook and Dawson, November 5, 2016; spoke with Cook about the route’s completion on November 6, 2016.

485.84  Satyr  5.6 *  This unexpectedly easy route makes smart use of Satyr Pinnacle’s line-of-least-resistance to reach its highest summit (the summit closest to Goat Rock).  Start at the same place as for the route Gruff.  Move up and right on a low-angle ramp 20 feet to a shoulder of rock and the route’s first bolt.  Continue up and around to the right to a second bolt which protects moves up an exposed arete past several large knobs, to a third bolt (the knobs can be slung as additional protection and/or as directionals for the follower).  Gain a flat spot and the route’s fourth (and last) lead bolt. Continue across a gap and then up a short face past two two-bolt anchors to the formation’s high point (use the lower anchor as protection on the way to the summit).  Descend by downclimbing back to the lower anchor and making a 70 foot rappel to the northwest (toward Goat Rock).  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 9, 2016.  Source(s):  Email from Cook reporting the route October 15, 2016; ascent of route with Alex Dawson November 5, 2016.

486.5  Forgettable Ewe 5.5 This route starts from the belay at the top of the first pitch of the route Lonely Sheepherder (route number 487). From that belay traverse left 25 feet out of the water streak, past a bolt, and into the next water streak. Climb that streak to the top. Belay at a unique pine which is growing horizontally. Walk off.  FA Party: Bruce Hildenbrand, Clint Cummins. FA Date: January 15, 2014.  Source(s): Mud'nCrud Forum, "Newly Established and Found Routes (Since the '07 Guidebook)," posting by Hildenbrand, January 16, 2014.

487.8 Up a Crook Without a Paddle 5.9 R  Start by climbing the first two pitches of Piece of Ewe. Although the first ascent party traversed left about three quarters of the way up Piece of Ewe's second pitch, they ended up with essentially no belay (see history below); modern parties belay at the bolt anchor on top of Piece of Ewe's second pitch (this was replaced in January 2014 and upgraded to two bolts). From that second pitch belay, downclimb 20 feet to a lower angle section of rock. Traverse left here for 40 feet, moving up at the end of the traverse into a large, right-facing corner (first gear here). Continue up the corner which steepens at a bulge (route crux). The corner continues about 25 feet above the bulge to the walkoff ledge for the third pitch of Piece of Ewe. Gear: small to three inches. FA: Bruce Hildenbrand, Mike Quirk, Richard Bechtel and, according to Hildenbrand, a fourth person whose name has been lost over time. FA Date: December 1977. Source(s): Posting by Bruce Hildenbrand to Mud'nCrud Forum, January 2014; additional email from Hildenbrand; ascent of route with John Cook, November 8, 2014.
Route History: This route's history is fairly unique and hair-raising and in an unusual step, is repeated here. According to Hildenbrand: "We all thought we were on Piece of Ewe when we did our route (this is the reason this route went unreported for 35+ years. When we recently rebolted Piece of Ewe the off-route mistake became clear). On our ascent, someone else led the second pitch. He traversed too low, missing the belay bolt on Piece of Ewe. He then set up a poor belay in the crack, consisting of a tied off, fist-sized chockstone in a three inch crack. I wasn't concerned about the poor belay because the route was only rated 5.7 and Chuck Richards' guide stressed the fact that a good bolt protected the crux. As it turned out, there was no protection on the third pitch. If the leader had fallen there was a very good possibility that the belay and belayers would have followed the leader into the abyss.  With modern camming protection this pitch might actually be somewhat safe to lead."
Modern Comment: Climbers with modern gear - including cams - followed the original lead all the way to the corner, but modern gear allowed only a very marginal belay in the three inch crack. So the modern leader downclimbed from the corner and returned to Piece of Ewe's second pitch belay. He brought up his second and then led (as per the description above) back to the corner and continued up it to the walkoff ledge (modern cams did provide some protection in the on again/off again crack).


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507.8  Pinnacle Seventeen  A1  This “historic residual” climb is located in The Back Twenty.
The Back Twenty:  The Back Twenty is a group of boulders, bumps and small to medium pinnacles located 100 to 300 yards northeast of The Flatiron.  Reach them by walking slightly downhill, mostly brush-free from The Flatiron’s east side.  In making this walk, smaller bumps of rock in open, easy terrain give way after 500 feet to slightly thicker brush and a band of 20 to 30 foot high pinnacles aligned roughly northwest to southeast (left to right).  Larger pinnacles behind this band make up the bulk of The Back Twenty, but most of these are low-angle and/or have easy to reach summits.  The area’s only climbing route is an obscure residual, having no known way to the summit other than a rope toss and prusik.
This Route:  Pinnacle Seventeen is the rightmost rock in the band of 20 to 30 foot high pinnacles 500 feet northeast of The Flatiron.  The formation’s southwest side (toward The Flatiron) is 20 feet high on the left, 30 feet high on the right, and becomes progressively more undercut to the right.  The pinnacle’s most visible feature is its single summit bolt.  This can be seen from the top of a rock band 60 feet to the southwest (toward The Flatiron).  Look for one bolt on a somewhat triangular, white-rock summit.  Although not visible from here, Pinnacle Seventeen’s northeast face is 15 feet high, but vertical, loose and fairly featureless.  Its south side has a low-angle shoulder, but this leads to another short, steep, featureless face.  Climb Pinnacle Seventeen by throwing a rope over the top and ascending it to the top.  The toss is easiest to make from the back (northeast) side.
FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Careful, careful inspection of route with Jennifer Wang on December 14, 2019, and, after finding no other possibilities, an ascent by toss and prusik.

507.35  The Maze - High Point  5.0  An easy route to the highest point of a large but broken-up formation.
The Maze:  The Maze is a cliff-like series of buttresses, gullies, alcoves and small pinnacles located north of The Flatiron and east of the High Peaks Trail.  The area extends a little more than 100 yards south to north.  Its downhill side is to the east.  Its west/uphill side is notable for the many small pinnacles visible from the trail.  Most of The Maze is dirty and mossy; parts are rotten and other parts are overhanging.  One route reaches the highest point, at its southwest end.
This Route:  The highest point of The Maze is easy to see from the approach trail to The Flatiron.  Look north from about halfway out the trail.  The south end of The Maze is all visible, including to the left (west) the highest point of the whole mass (it has two similarly sized summits).  Walk to a short face that is right of the high point but to the left of two low notches.  Easy class five over a noticeable foot-deep ledge leads six feet onto a low part of the south end.  Turn left (northwest) and climb 50 feet to the high point (class three and four).  There is no protection on this route and no top anchor.  Descend by downclimbing.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Solo ascent of route on December 28, 2019.

507.42  The Right Honourable Robert  5.4  this route summits Peel Pinnacle, a complex formation in The South Platte.
The South Platte:  The South Platte consists of a large number of boulders, pinnacles and rock-jumbles on the ridge crest, north of Photographer’s Delight, but south of Long’s Folly (listed below).  The whole area is west of the High Peaks Trail.  There is a huge amount of rock here; routes exist on three large pinnacles and three that are smaller.  Also of note, although these rocks are just east/uphill from the Juniper Canyon Trail formation Pyramid Pinnacle, all of the pinnacles in The South Platte are steep to undercut on their west sides.  It isn’t practical to move from Pyramid to The South Platte (or vice versa).
Peel Pinnacle:  Peel Pinnacle is the southmost large formation in The South Platte (“large” in that, unlike rocks to its south, it is more than 25 feet high and requires more than a scramble to reach its top).  Peel is located on the High Peaks ridge crest.  It is 100 yards north of the High Peaks Trail switchback located 200 feet north of Photographer’s Delight.  It is very easy to see Peel from that switchback and from other parts of the trail further south; the south side of its summit has large, easily visible patches of lichen (mostly orange, interspersed with bits of lime green).  Although the pinnacle is easy to see from the south, it is best approached from the southeast.  Make the right turn at the switchback north of Photographer’s (turn to the southeast).  Continue past the next (left) switchback (and the exit to The Flatiron).  After another 100 yards, immediately before two very closely spaced switchbacks, exit up and left, over a waist high rock step, to and then along the northeast sides of multiple small pinnacles.  Angle northwest, gently uphill, to Peel Pinnacle’s south side, 250 feet from the trail.  This side of the formation features a prominent two-foot thick, up-and-right band of slightly redder rock, and below that a wide up-and-right ramp.  Two features are noticeable above the bottom of this ramp: a slab below a chute and a left-facing squeeze chimney.  
This Route:  The Right Honourable Robert starts below the chute on the south side of Peel Pinnacle.  Climb a slab to the chute.  Continue up the chute to the first bolt 30 feet above the ground.  Reach a saddle of rock between summits before moving up and right to a sub-summit and a second bolt.  Make a step-across onto Peel’s highest summit and a two-bolt anchor, 55 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 27, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.43  Scurvy  5.4  Climb the left-facing squeeze chimney to the right of The Right Honourable Robert.  The chimney leads to the sub-summit on that route and its second bolt.  Finish on the summit.  Protection consists of a one inch piece and the bolt.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 27, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.5 Glad Stone  5.4  Glad Stone is a separate, prominent pinnacle located in the jumble of rock north of Peel Pinnacle.  It is 60 feet north-northwest from Peel’s main (orange-lichened) summit, on a straight line between Peel and Sweet Marie Pinnacle (listed below).  Glad Stone is slightly lower in elevation than Peel or Sweet Marie, but taller than anything else in between.  Reach its summit in two short pitches.  For pitch one, climb The Right Honourable Robert to its second bolt.  Continue east from there, 20 feet down a small, class two ridge of rock.  Turn left (west) to descend another class two ramp 30 feet to a mostly flat, grassy area.  Belay from trees.  Move to and up an east-facing slot (gear: small to 1½ inch) onto a shoulder of rock that is just below (southwest) of Glad Stone’s summit.  Walk a few feet to the pinnacle’s upper west face and a two-bolt anchor six feet below its summit.  Climb past the anchor to that summit.  Descend by moving down to the anchor, rappelling 40 feet to the grassy area and then reversing to the top of Peel Pinnacle.  Rappel again from there.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, Kathy Cook, John Cook, Amber Fipps.  FA Date:  January 12, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.61  Half Platte  5.4  This mountaineering-style route reaches the top of Sweet Marie Pinnacle from far to the south.  
Sweet Marie Pinnacle:  Sweet Marie Pinnacle is a large, multi-multi-facetted formation located about midway south-to-north through The South Platte.  It has one distinct high point and several subsidiary and maybe-subsidiary summits.  The formation is complex and, from some directions, hard to access.  Its west and east ends are overhanging to very overhanging.  Sweet Marie’s north face is also steep to overhanging.  Three routes reach Sweet Marie’s highest summit.  One reaches it from the south by way of Peel Pinnacle and Glad Stone.  A second starts on the High Peaks Trail and climbs along the south side of the formation’s east end.  The other climbs the only real weakness in Sweet Marie’s north side.  The south side route is listed first.
This Route:  Start on the south side of Peel Pinnacle.  Climb the route Glad Stone to its two-bolt end anchor.  Move north and down 15 feet (a four inch piece is critical to protect the follower here).  Continue north another 50 feet to the top of Sweet Marie Pinnacle, finishing at its two-bolt anchor.  Descend by reversing the route or by rappelling off Sweet Marie’s north side (60 feet to the ground).  FA Party:  Brad Young, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  January 31, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.64  Slip’n Slide  5.3  The slip and slide part of this route is the approach to its start from the High Peaks Trail (it is best to do this route in dry conditions).  Begin the approach 150 feet south of the southmost carved steps and handrails on the High Peaks Trail (these aren’t quite in sight at the trail exit-point when northbound).  Move uphill 40 feet to a 15 foot high, mossy ramp (class four when dry).  Continue up the gully to a point where dirt becomes rock.  Climb the chute above.  Its steepest part is protected by two bolts, after which it becomes class four.  Exit left, using a slung knob for protection.  Finish on Sweet Marie’s summit and a two-bolt anchor, 75 feet from the start.  Descend by rappelling off to the north, 60 feet to the ground.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 7, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

507.65  Almost Always  5.6  Almost Always climbs a weakness on the north side of Sweet Marie Pinnacle.  Reach this weakness from the High Peaks Trail, 50 feet south of that trail’s southmost/low angle metal handrails.  Move west (steeply uphill) on grassy slopes to the left of mossy slabs.  After 150 feet, turn left (south).  Walk 50 feet, between low rocks, to the start of an up-and-left ramp/chimney on Sweet Marie’s north side.  Easy but awkward climbing up the ramp/chimney leads to its top and a broad, almost-flat area (protection to this point: small to 2½ inch gear and slung knobs).  A bolt above protects moves over an overlap.  Continue up the broad, east ridge over bulges, past two more bolts to a fourth bolt that is on the east side of Sweet Marie’s summit tower.  Climb up and right onto a shoulder and a fifth bolt.  Finish onto the summit and a two-bolt anchor, 115 feet from the start.  Rappel 60 feet off the pinnacle’s north side.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  January 31, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.  

507.71  Full Loaf - Buttered Toast  5.5  A traversing route up the larger of the two Low Down Loaves.  
The Low Down Loaves:  The Low Down Loaves consist of two formations, one large and one very small.  Both are located west of the High Peaks ridge crest, north of Sweet Marie Pinnacle, and south of Queen Charlotte Dome (listed below).  Seen from the east, both pinnacles have a bread-loaf like appearance.  The north side of the smaller, north “loaf” (Half Loaf) is 25 feet south of Queen Charlotte Dome’s south side (and Queen Charlotte looms over it).  Half Loaf is separated from the northeast end of its larger companion (Full Loaf) by a four foot wide, east to west oriented corridor.  
This Route:  Full Loaf is inaccessible on most sides.  Even its short, 35 foot high, east and northeast sides are steep and fairly holdless.  A ledge and ramp system on the far right side of its north face allows access to the summit.  Climb an easy, mossy slab below the left end of a somewhat discontinuous ledge that extends well to the right.  A fixed piton protects the first technical moves.  Continue to the right past two more fixed pins and the route’s first crux, reaching the lowest right end of a prominent up-and-left ramp.  A bolt protects moves onto the ramp.  Climb up and left 12 feet to a second bolt which protects the route’s second crux.  The up-and-left ramp becomes class four soon after the second bolt.  Reach a point east of the formation’s highest (west) summit.  A boulder move leads onto that summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Descend by a 60 foot rappel back to the start.  Note that careful planning and rope management are necessary to reduce rope drag for the leader and to make the climb as safe as possible for a follower.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang, Kathy Cook, John Cook.  FA Date:  February 2, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.74  Half Loaf - The Slice  5.7  A short route up the smaller of two Low Down Loaves (see description of The Low Down Loaves above).  Start in the narrow corridor between Half Loaf and Full Loaf’s 35 foot high northeast end.  A bolt 15 feet up protects crux moves onto the summit ridge, 20 feet from the start.  Move 20 feet east to the summit.  There is no anchor; descend using a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Shawn Shafai, Julie Nordquist.  FA Date:  January 19, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.82  The Missing Link  5.9 *  A two-pitch route up previously unclimbed Queen Charlotte Dome.  
Queen Charlotte Dome:  Queen Charlotte Dome is the largest and northmost formation in The South Platte.  It is notable in that the southmost, carved steps and handrails on the High Peaks Trail cross its east toe.  Although not particularly visible from the trail, Queen Charlotte’s very big south face is noticeably red, rotten and overhanging.  Its west end also overhangs.  Much of the dome’s north side is mossy and directly over the trail.  This side is also very steep in several places.  The formation’s two climbing routes follow weaknesses on the far right side of the south face and on the right-center of the north face.  The south face route is listed first.
This Route:  Approach this inobvious, two-pitch route by leaving the High Peaks Trail to the west, uphill, 50 feet south of that trail’s southmost metal handrails (this is the same point of departure as for Sweet Marie Pinnacle).  Move more to the right (northwest) than the Sweet Marie approach, aiming for the base of a series of very large blocks and pillars that lean against Queen Charlotte’s southeast side.  Continue up into a narrowing gap between Queen Charlotte and a smaller rock ridge to its south.  The gap narrows to 10 feet then suddenly widens at just under 200 feet from the trail.  The left edge of the leftmost pillar is here, almost at the high point of ground on the dome’s south side.  The route’s 60 foot class four first pitch starts behind the leftmost pillar.  Climb an up-and-right ramp behind the pillars to a one-bolt belay just below their highest point.  The second pitch climbs a shallow water chute straight up and then up and right past five bolts to a shoulder of rock.  The rest of the pitch is class four, up and left, ending at a two-bolt anchor 80 feet from the start.  Rappel 80 feet off the dome’s south side (directly back to the start of pitch one).  FA Party:  Alan Nilsson, Brad Young, Tonya Nilsson.  FA Date: January 18, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

507.84  The Stroll  5.2 *  The Stroll climbs the line of least resistance to the top of Queen Charlotte Dome.  It is intricate enough that it can be hard to distinguish where the approach ends and the climb starts.  Begin on the High Peaks Trail between Queen Charlotte Dome’s north side and the carved stair-steps leading north up to the east side of Long’s Folly (listed below).  Leave the trail at its westmost point, where it makes a sharp right turn toward the stair steps.  Walk southeast up a low-angle rock ridge to a point 30 feet above the trail.  Move levelly to the south 20 feet to a shoulder of rock above (north of) a 15 foot deep slot.  Enter the slot by traversing east on an almost-ledge.  Move west, down the slot, 10 feet past a pine tree.  Climb the slot’s north-facing wall eight feet to the top of a ramp.  The route’s first bolt is slightly right (to protect the ramp descent).  Move down the ramp 20 feet to a flat, low notch.  Finish this pitch at a two-bolt belay on the west-facing slab just past (south of) the notch.  The slab above is protected by three bolts; move first slightly right, then slightly left.  Finish after 105 feet at a two-bolt anchor on the northwest edge of Queen Charlotte’s spacious, fairly nearly-flat summit.  Descend by a 55 foot rappel past the last lead bolt, back to the top of the slot.  FA Party:  Tricia Young, Brad Young.  FA Date:  January 4, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

519.6  Mister Bolt Jangles  5.8 ** Start on top of a large boulder located 40 feet right of Monga Bonna Memorial Route and left of a separate, huge block.  Climb 15 feet from the boulder to the first bolt.  Six more bolts and gear (two to three inches) protect climbing up and left, then up, 80 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  Descend by rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Peter Braun.  FA Date:  February 8, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

530.05  Condorks  5.9 R *  This one-pitch route is on the north side of Condor Crag - South, but is included here because it is so close to routes on Condor Crag - North’s north side.  It starts on top of a thin rock fin, 50 feet right of The Great Chimney.  Start by moving down and stemming to the first bolt (it’s at the same height as the top of the fin).  Move up and right past two bolts and then up past two more.  Although the route’s first five bolts are easy to see from the rock fin, no others are visible.  Bolt six is 30 feet above bolt five and bolt seven is 25 feet higher.  One more bolt protects climbing to a two-bolt anchor 145 feet from the rock fin (eight lead bolts total).  Descend by rappel from a two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Adam Long, John Bolte.  FA Date:  November 2013.  Source(s):  Telephone discussions with Adam Long soon after route was established; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons, February 15, 2020.

530.1  Bibulous Bluff  Class Four *  Bibulous Bluff is 125 feet east from the bottom of the northmost set of metal handrails on the High Peaks Trail (commonly called “the Steep and Narrows”).  Although its east and south sides are very high (and mostly rotten), its north and west sides are much less so.  Make an almost-level approach to its northwest side, bypassing a smaller outlier to its immediate west.  Seen from the northwest, Bibulous Bluff looks like a slender mound extending to the south.  Climb a six foot high notch on the west side’s far left (north) end.  After gaining the top of what amounts to a low-angle ridge, continue south, over another notch 40 more feet to the summit and then past that to the bluff’s very exposed south end.  There is no protection and no top anchor.  Descend by downclimbing.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Ascent of formation on December 31, 2019; multiple ascents by John Cook, Kathy Cook, Deb Collins, January 5, 2020.

530.2  Mescaline Mound  5.2 Mescaline Mound is a scruffy, multi-tiered  pinnacle located 150 feet northeast of the northmost handrail on the High Peaks Trail.  By way of further identification, two very large holes in the pinnacle’s steep, rotten southwest face are easy to see from the High Peaks Trail and the Mound’s 20 foot high, overhanging southmost end is 30 feet north from the north end of Bibulous Bluff.  Note also that the formation is 150 feet south from the south side of Pot Pinnacle (listed next).  Much of Mescaline Mound is steep or rotten.  Its north side however features a mossy, low-angle chute that can be climbed to a point five feet below the summit (pro: one to 1½ inch and tied off trees).  Move onto the summit, which has no anchor.  Descend by downclimbing or by making a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  December 31, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

530.32  Pot Pinnacle - Moonshiner’s Chimney  5.5  Moonshiner’s Chimney is the leftmost of three routes on Pot Pinnacle’s east side.  Climb a 55 foot high flared chimney to a spacious, flat area (this is the first pitch belay ledge for Up In Smoke, listed next).  Finish on Up In Smoke, 35 feet to Pot’s summit.  Gear: one to six inches.  Descend (as for all three Pot Pinnacle routes) by rappelling 50 feet down The Roper Route (note that “The Roper Route” refers to the 5.5 - really 5.6 R - that is the only route listed on this formation in the 2007 guidebook).  FA Party:  John Cook, Tricia Young, Brad Young, Deb Collins, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  January 5, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

530.33  Pot Pinnacle - Up In Smoke  5.3 *  This fun route takes the line of least resistance to the top of Pot Pinnacle.  Start on the formation’s northeast side, in the same place as The Roper Route (note that “The Roper Route” refers to the 5.5 - really 5.6 R - that is the only route listed on this formation in the 2007 guidebook).  While The Roper Route goes straight up a chute, Up In Smoke climbs an up-and-left slanting crack and ramp.  Continue 60 feet to a spacious flat area.  Belay from trees.  The 35 foot second pitch follows a right-facing corner before moving right to the shared three-bolt anchor.  Protection consists of one each one, two, three and five inch (the five inch piece is used on both pitches).  FA Party:  John Cook, Craig Collins.  FA Date:  November 6, 2019.  Source(s):  Email report of route from John Cook, November 7, 2019; ascent of route with Mark Fletcher and Dennis Erik Mr Mud, December 30, 2019.

530.4  Illicit Chimney Dome  5.4  Illicit Chimney Dome isn’t really a dome, it is a short pinnacle located 100 yards southeast (slightly downhill) from Pot and Peyote and a little over 200 feet east (downhill) from Bibulous Bluff.  It is the largest of many rocks and tiny pinnacles down low on this east side of the High Peaks ridge crest.  The best approach is from the south side of Peyote Pillar (no cliffs and less brush).  Seen from that point, Illicit Chimney Dome is split by a chimney, with the main pinnacle on the left and a subsidiary pinnacle on the right.  Climb the northwest side of this chimney 20 feet to the top of the subsidiary pinnacle.  A sling over the top of this feature protects a step-across onto the main formation.  Continue 15 feet to the summit.  There is no anchor on top; return to the obvious saddle and make a Pinnacles rappel off the northeast side, 55 feet to the ground.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Mark Fletcher.  FA Date:  December 30, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

536.6  Not Today  5.10c R  This 70 foot route climbs a west-facing cliff just east of the High Peaks Trail.  The cliff is 100 feet north of The Sponge and 60 feet south of Burgundy Dome (listed next).  Not Today starts five feet north of where the cliff actually touches the east edge of the trail.  Its first bolt is 15 feet up and easily visible from the start.  Bolt two is almost 20 feet higher, at the bottom lip of a 14 inch diameter hole.  Continue past a triangular, light-colored lodestone and then a third bolt to finish at a series of sturdy bushes.  The three bolts can be supplemented by so-so slung knobs and a marginal 2½ inch piece in a hole.  Descend by scrambling up and right and then back left (north) before moving down to the High Peaks Trail at Burgundy Dome.  FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Email from Gavin Emmons during December 2017 regarding a partial ascent he made of the route (to its second bolt); Rappel inspection of route on December 15, 2019.

544.8 Stepping Stone 5.9 Stepping Stone Pinnacle is a 35 foot high, free-standing formation located between the Tuff Dome area and Spike's Peak. It is about 150 feet south of the High Peaks Trail (i.e. toward Tuff Dome from that trail). The most commonly used climber's path from the High Peaks Trail to the Tuff Dome area passes right next to this pinnacle, on its north and west sides. The formation has a distinct, 20 foot high shoulder on its west side (the "stepping stone"). Easy and unprotected fifth class on the northwest side of the formation leads to the top of the shoulder. One bolt protects moves from this point to the top of the pinnacle. NOTE: The first ascent party used one bolt to protect the moves to the summit. Mostly this was because of the late hour in the day. The first ascent party intends to return and add a second lead bolt (so that a fall will not result in a broken ankle), but cannot do so until the 2012 raptor closures are lifted. ALSO: The summit anchor presently consists of one bolt, with one screw gate (also because of the late hour). This was used to hold the rope in place so that a "Pinnacles rappel" could be used to descend. The first ascent party intends to place a second summit bolt and to add chains to make a proper summit anchor; this, however, will also have to wait until the raptor closures are lifted later in 2012. EDIT: As of 1-15-13 the route has two lead bolts and a fall isn't likely to break an ankle now (the route's "R" sub-rating has now been removed). There is also now a two bolt summit anchor with equalized chains. FA Party: Gavin Emmons, Brad Young, Alacia Welch. FA Date: January 14, 2012. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

556.2  A Play in Three Parts  5.10b (TR)  Toprope up the middle of Bynum Spire’s west face.  Unfortunately the rock, on this otherwise pretty route is loose.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Report from Robert Behrens regarding “accidentally” climbing this face, January 10, 2015; ascent of route with John Cook and Lisa Lee, January 19, 2015.

557.1  Two Fifty Too Quick  5.7  The Fins are a series of long, slender pinnacles that extend from southeast to northwest.  They are located southwest of Tuff Dome and above/northeast of The Sponge.  Four different Fins are numbered, starting with The First Fin (closest to Tuff Dome), extending to The Fourth Fin (closest to The Sponge).  The wide northeast face of the First Fin - which includes the route Begin it Now - is 100 yards southwest of Tuff Dome and easily visible.  Access the first three Fins from Tuff Dome along an open and viewful ridge top.  A large gap and intervening cliffs make it necessary to access The Fourth Fin from the High Peaks trail near Burgundy Dome (see route 557.8  “The Fourth Fin - Regular Route” for notes regarding such access).  Two Fifty Too Quick ascends the blunt arete 10 to 15 feet right of Begin it Now.  Four bolts protect 55 feet of climbing to a small, separate summit and a two-bolt anchor which is shared with Nine Hundred for the Lead.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Gavin Emmons, Brad Young, Rosie Hansen. FA Date:  January 10, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

557.2  Nine Hundred for the Lead  5.6 *  This route follows the most obvious weakness in the central part of The First Fin’s northeast face.  Three bolts protect straight up climbing to a very shallow bowl.  Move up and right past two more bolts to the fin’s long thin top.  Continue left past one more bolt (a directional to protect followers) to a small summit and a two-bolt anchor shared with Two Fifty Too Quick.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Tricia Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook, Steve Dawson, Laura Dawson, Alex Dawson, Gavin  Emmons, Alacia Welch, Bob Walton, Robert Behrens, Rosie Hansen, Julie Nordquist, Shawn Shafai, Joel Primrose, Jim McConachie, Dennis Erik Mr Mud, Jon Cochran, Noal Elkins, Brian Hamilton, Joe Denicola, Whitney Reynier.  FA Date:  January 10, 2015.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

557.6  Finagle  5.6 *  This route is on the third of four long, slender pinnacles that make up The Fins.  It starts between the narrow southeast ends of the Second and Third Fins.  Chimney moves lead up 25 feet to a bolt on the left (on the Third Fin).  This bolt protects moves onto a large, flat shoulder.  Two more bolts protect the rest of the Third Fin’s still-narrow, upper, southwest face.  A two-bolt anchor allows a 50 foot rappel back to the base.  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  December 21, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

557.8  The Fourth Fin - Regular Route  5.1  Much of The Fourth Fin is rotten, undercut or very steep.  The one weakness on it is to the right of center on the formation’s northeast side (the side-facing the Third Fin, at the uphill end of the 25 foot wide gap between this Fin and The Third Fin).  Approach this route from the High Peaks trail right at Burgundy Dome.  Move uphill from there; walking and light scrambling lead into a class two chimney between The Third Fin and a very small pinnacle.  Continue up this to the top of the gap between the Third and Fourth Fins.  Use a series of large boulders here to reach the top of an eight foot diameter chockstone (class four; it is of interest too that this chockstone can be seen in silhouette from the normal West Side parking area).  Move across the chockstone and on to the class two northwest shoulder of the formation.  This leads in 40 feet to the summit block.  A couple easy class five moves lead to the top.  There is no summit anchor.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Self; ascent of route December 27, 2014 with Tricia Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook.

560.22 Abuela Cochinita 5.8 **  Abuela Cochinita is the first-listed of several newly established routes on Spike’s Peak.  
Spike’s Peak: The 2007 guidebook describes four routes on Spike Peak’s three separate summits.  The four are described in counterclockwise/circular order starting on the formation’s south side.  Listed first is the route Spike’s Peak (route number 558) on the middle pinnacle.  Kermit and Miss Piggy (routes 550 and 560) on the east (closest-to-the-trail) formation appear next, and Little Javelina (route number 601) on the southwest pinnacle is listed last (although the book calls this the “west-most” pinnacle, southwest is probably a better descriptor).  The three separate pinnacles that make up Spike’s Peak are divided by narrow chimneys (two narrow chimneys dividing three pinnacles).  
Abuela Cochinita:  Abuela Cochinita is on the east face of Spike’s east pinnacle (it is on the same face as, but 60 feet to the right of, the route Miss Piggy).  The route is easily visible 25 feet west of the sharp turn in the trail which is 80 feet southwest of Dragonfly Dome (that is, the sharp turn is 80 feet to the left of a person standing on the trail looking at Dragonfly Dome).  Start with easy climbing to the first bolt, which is 15 feet up, on the right side of a large hole.  Four more bolts lead up and left.  A sixth bolt protects moves straight up a headwall to a two bolt anchor.  Descend by moving over to the Miss Piggy two bolt anchor (placed by that route’s first ascentionist in 2009), which is rigged for rappel.  As a further note, Bob’s grandmother was given the nickname “Cochinita,” or “Cochie,” by her big brother when she was an infant.  The name stayed with her for 80 years.  In Spanish, Abuela Cochinita means grandmother little pig or grandma piglet; a play on the next route to the left, Miss Piggy.  FA Party: Brad Young, Bob Walton. FA Date: April 13, 2010. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

560.23  Poached Pig  5.10b (TR) **  The anchor bolts atop this route were discovered as the first ascent of Abuela Cochinita was being finished.  These (two) bolts are just over 15 feet right (west of) the anchor bolts for that route.  Start Poached Pig by climbing to the first bolt on Abuela Cochinita.  Continue straight up the (steep) face to the anchor bolts.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery of the anchor bolts by Brad Young, April, 2010.  Toprope ascents of route by Jim McConachie, Brad Young, Laura and Steve Dawson, Alan Nilsson, Joel Primrose, Joe Denicola, February 6, 2011.

560.41  Ham Sandwich  5.9 *  This route climbs Spike’s Peak’s middle pinnacle.  It starts in the chimney between the middle and east pinnacles, 45 feet left (south/up-chimney) of the route Razorback (listed next).  Begin climbing Ham Sandwich where the ground at the bottom of the chimney gets noticeably steeper.  Four bolts on middle’s northeast face protect a narrow chimney.  Transition to face climbing past two more bolts to a wide, deep ledge.  The steep wall above is the route crux.  It is protected by two more bolts (eight lead bolts total).  Finish after 100 feet at the two-bolt anchor for the route Spike’s Peak (number 558 in the 2007 guidebook).  Descend by rappel in one of two ways.  First, it is possible to rappel 80 feet directly to the ground over route 558.  But, the base of that route is in a huge thicket of poison oak.  As an alternative, walk 60 feet northwest on the middle pinnacle’s summit, to the top anchor for Swine Flue (listed below).  Use this anchor to rappel 25 feet southeast to the two-bolt Razorback top anchor (which is 15 feet below the top of the pinnacle).  Make a 100 foot rappel to the ground from this anchor.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons and Brian Hamilton.  FA Date:  November 4, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on November 10, 2019; ascent of route with Emmons, November 12, 2019.

560.43  Razorback 5.11a ***  Razorback is a fairly long route on great rock.  It requires wild stemming back to the neighboring wall, gets increasingly difficult, and finishes with sustained crimps and delicate footwork.  The route is located on the east face of Spike’s Peak’s middle summit.  Approach from the north side of the formation (from a point about midway along the approach from the High Peaks Trail to Little Javelina).  Start where the middle and east Spike’s Peak formations come close enough together to form a chimney.  Eleven bolts lead 100 feet to a two-bolt anchor which is 15 feet below the summit.  (Note: the last two bolts were added by the first ascent party after the first ascent.)  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons and Brian Hamilton.  FA Date:  August 21, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; watched ascents of route by Emmons and others, October 14, 2018.

560.61  Squealer Squeezer 5.4  This short route is the left-most of several located between Spike’s southwest and center pinnacles.  These several routes are listed from left to right (starting with Squealer Squeezer, the south-most route, extending past other routes to the right/north, and finishing with Dances With Warthogs, a route which parallel’s the established north-side route Little Javelina).  Approach Squealer Squeezer from the south side of Spike’s.  Squeeze into the south end of the chimney that is between the middle and southwest pinnacles, continuing to a point just before (south of) a two-foot diameter chockstone which is itself below two larger chockstones.  The route starts as a chimney and then continues up the east face of Spike’s southwest pinnacle past three bolts in 45 feet of climbing.  Finish at a two-bolt anchor located on the southeast shoulder of that southwest formation (the anchor is shared with the route Pockety Peccary, listed next).  Descend by scrambling to the southeast, past the south end of the chimney, and then to the ground.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons (Emmons climbed the route free solo and then returned and placed the lead bolts three weeks later).  FA Date:  June 2, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; ascent of route with Katie Young, October 14, 2018.

560.63  Pockety Peccary  5.7 *  This route is located about halfway through the chimney that divides Spike’s center and southwest pinnacles.  Approach from the north (passing under the route Bacon Bits, listed below).  A tight starting-chimney is the crux of the route.  This slowly widens until the route becomes a face-climb on the well-pocketed east side of the southwest pinnacle.  Five bolts lead up and slightly left.  Three more bolts then lead left to a two-bolt anchor 90 feet from the start (the route’s last bolt and anchor are shared with Squealer Squeezer).  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons and Alacia Welch.  FA Date:  July 22, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons and Katie Young, October 14, 2018.

560.64  Swine Flue  5.10a **  An adventurous and inventive climb.  Climb to the fifth bolt of Pockety Peccary.  Continue straight up to a sixth bolt before stemming to the west face of Spike’s middle pinnacle (wild!).  Follow a shallow chute up that face past five more bolts to finish at a two-bolt anchor on Spike’s middle summit (11 lead bolts total in 120 feet).  Descend by making a 115 foot rappel back into the chimney and then to the base of the climb.  FA Party: Gavin Emmons.  FA Date:  August 5, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons, October 14, 2018.

560.65  Bacon Bits  5.8 **  A fun climb which starts 20 feet south of the north end of the middle/southwest chimney (the route starts about 35 feet upslope from Dances With Warthogs, listed next).  Like its sister routes to the left, Bacon Bits starts as a squeeze chimney.  As the chimney widens, the route stays on the east face of the southwest pinnacle.  Excellent pockets lead to a crux bulge.  Finish at a separate two-bolt anchor on the southwest pinnacle, 90 feet from the start.  Protection consists of eight bolts and a few one to two inch pieces (used between the fourth and fifth bolts).  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons. FA Date: 8-12-18.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; watched ascents of route by Emmons and others, October 14, 2018.

560.67  Dances With Warthogs  5.10a ***  An outstanding, longer climb on impeccable rock.  Start below a bulge, slightly left of Little Javelina.  The bulge protects with one to two inch cams.  Continue up and a little left to the first of 10 bolts.  These lead 115 feet to the southwest formation’s summit and a two-bolt anchor shared with Little Javelina (these anchor bolts were replaced by Gavin Emmons and John Cook on June 29, 2018).  Note: a 70-meter rope is just long enough to allow a one-rope toprope for this route and Little Javelina.  FA Party:  Gavin Emmons and Brian Hamilton.  FA Date:  June 11, 2018.  Source(s):  Email from Emmons on August 26, 2018; watched ascents of route by Emmons and others, October 14, 2018.

560.7  Mean Max  5.4  Mean Max is a large pinnacle located 250 feet north of Spike’s Peak.  It is quite tall on its north side.  The shorter south (uphill) side is 50 feet high.  A direct approach to Mean Max from Spike’s isn’t possible; a large dome (due north of Spike’s) and a scruffy cliff (west of the dome) are between the two.  Instead, move west (downhill) from the north side of Spike’s Peak.  At a point 200 feet from Spike’s west pinnacle, move north until it is possible to continue northeast to the uphill side of Mean Max.  Walk north into a wide corridor between Max and a low, long pinnacle to its east.  Continue to a notch between Max and a separate, slender spire.  Climb Mean Max’s 50 foot high east face to its spacious summit.  Protection consists of two bolts and holes for two and four inch gear.  A two-bolt summit anchor allows a rappel off the south side to a grassy area above a short, class three groove.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang.  FA Date:  March 14, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

564.24  Rituals and Magic  5.9 **  Four items of information preface this route description.  First, headlamps are mandatory on this climb no matter what the time of day.  The climb’s lower pitches are so deep in chimney-systems that it is impossible to see critical holds without artificial light.  Second, this route should only be climbed in very dry conditions.  It takes very little rain to make parts of the route literally slimy.  Third, the route gets one star for the climbing and one for its wildly adventurous nature.  Fourth, Rituals and Magic shares an approach, and, higher up, a “hanging meadow” with the easier route Meanderthal (listed next).  The two also parallel each other above the meadow.  Consider learning the approach and the north side of H and L Dome by climbing Meanderthal before attempting Rituals and Magic.
Approach:  Approach from the High Peaks Trail by walking around The Smokestack’s east (left) side into a wide dirt gully below its south face (this gully descends from northwest to southeast under the steep northeast side of The Flakes).  Walk down this wide dirt gully (southeast), staying 50 to 100 feet out from the wall below The Flakes.  At a point 200 yards below (due south from) The Smokestack, look for Meanderthal’s brushy, up-and-left, first pitch ramp (with the 10 foot high wide-crack start).  Continue downhill another 250 feet from this point to the top of a series of small rock ridges/boulders.  Descend these, class three and four, 40 feet to a series of water-polished alcoves below a noticeable, deep chimney-bottom/water chute.  By way of further identification of the route’s start-point, these alcoves are 200 feet west and slightly higher uphill from the formations Chuck and Carol.  Note also an eight-foot high, finger-like spire 100 feet uphill/southeast from the start point (along the main wall).
Pitch One, 5.4 (80 feet):  Move up to a fixed piton at the back of the highest alcove.  Traverse from it five feet left, into the deep chimney-bottom.  Continue walking straight back in the chimney to a point where level progress is no longer possible.  Belay from gear.
Pitch Two, 5.8 (45 feet):  Climb the flaring chimney above.  The pitch crux comes where a protruding lodestone forces a climber out from the flare.  Belay from a roomy, flat alcove (“The Crow’s Nest”) from one bolt and tiny gear.  
Pitch Three, 5.7 (55 feet):  Note the huge chockstone directly above the pitch two belay (“Godzilla’s Testicle”).  Although the route passes over this feature, it does so only after all climbers are out from under it, above and to its side.  Chimney up and right (toward the outside of the chimney) from The Crow’s Nest to a two-bolt anchor above a lodestone stance.  Protection (all on the same wall as the pitch-two belay bolt) consists of a hole which takes a good four-inch piece, and three lead bolts.  
Pitch Four, 5.7 (55 feet):  Move down onto the top of Godzilla’s Testicle.  Crux moves lead up twin cracks on the right (right when facing into the chimney).  A wide, easy slot leads to an unprotected 5.5 squeeze chimney.  Belay from trees just below a series of flat rock-tops interspersed with patches of grass (the “hanging meadow”).  Note that this belay point is about 50 feet left (south) from the start of Meanderthal’s second pitch.
Pitch Five, 5.7 (130 feet):  Walk into the start of another deep, straight-back/southeast-to-northwest oriented chimney (it parallels the chimney climbed by Meanderthal’s second pitch).  Pass a separate, smaller, southwest-oriented, left-branch chimney which allows walk-up access to the top of the second pitch of the route Feather Canyon.  A short headwall is bypassed by way of a 5.2, right-to-left traverse.  Continue levelly to another headwall 85 feet from the start.  Overcome this with 12 feet of 5.5 chimneying to the right.  Move to the back of a large, tree-filled, flat alcove (slings through a hole in the rock allow an optional belay here).  Fifteen feet of 5.7 lead into another flat-floored alcove (“The Cockpit”) and a two-bolt anchor.
Pitch Six, 5.9 (65 feet):  Two bolts protect 25 feet of flared chimney.  Continue in the now lower-angle, still-flared chimney to a third bolt (on the right wall, just above the first chockstone).  Reach a point below a series of chockstones.  Chimney out and around these, to a two-bolt belay above.  
Pitch Seven, 5.3 (55 feet):  Move up eight feet onto the tops of a series of large boulders.  Go left and a little up through oak trees to a belay platform at the base of an up-and-left,  low-angle water chute (it has a 20 foot high groove/seam just to its right).
Pitch Eight, 5.6 (100 feet):  Climb a headwall 15 feet to a bolt.  A fixed piton five feet higher protects moves up and left into the main chute.  Climb past three more bolts to a point just below a huge boulder.  Move up and left to a one-bolt belay behind the boulder.
Pitch Nine, 5.5 (145 feet):  Walk 75 feet uphill/south in a meadow to join the sixth pitch of the route Feather Canyon.  A short face on the right, to the right of the largest pinnacle, leads to a flat area.  Move left to another short face which leads to the top of the ridge.  Belay by placing a large loop of rope over a small pinnacle.
Pitch Ten, 5.4 (100 feet):  Move down 10 feet.  Climb a 20-foot face past a bolt.  Walk down and left along the ridge-top.  Continue around the right side of a pinnacle to a one-bolt belay.
Pitch Eleven, 5.3 (145 feet):  Move left and then up to a bolt 20 feet above the belay.  Continue to an up-and-right ramp.   Follow this to a short headwall protected by a second bolt.  A third bolt 15 feet higher protects a last, very short headwall.  Continue north over a series of humps on the ridge-top to the summit of H and L Dome and a two-bolt anchor.
Descent:  Reverse the class four, second pitch of H and L - Regular Route (down and then up to the top of that route’s first pitch).  Rappel to the ground.
Gear:  One each tiny to four inches.
FA Party:  Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran, Brad Young, Noal Elkins, Geoff Norris, John Cook.  FA Date:  November 17, 2019.  Source(s):  Detailed verbal description of route with a topo by Jon Cochran, November 5, 2019; ascent of route with Jennifer Wang and Jon Cochran, November 10 and 17, 2019.

564.2 Meanderthal 5.5 * This adventurous multi-pitch climb lies in the complex series of gullies, rock fins and pinnacles below/east of The Flakes and northeast of H&L Dome (the area can be seen well from the Condor Gulch Trail at The Peanuts).  Meanderthal is a fun route that is similar in nature to Feather Canyon; it takes a smart line of weakness among otherwise impenetrable walls, it’s multi-pitch, and it’s a good adventure.  Note too that the route can easily be done in shorter pitches than are described below (if, for example, inexperienced climbers needing closer attention are along).
Preparation: Take a few small cams, one four inch piece and several runners.  It is also strongly recommended that climbers not take a pack on this route.  Instead, leave packs near the top, on the approach to The Flakes, before walking back to the trail and around to start the approach.
Approach:  Approach from the High Peaks Trail by walking around The Smokestack’s east (left) side into a wide dirt gully below its south face (this gully descends from northwest to southeast under the steep northeast side of The Flakes). Walk down this wide dirt gully (southeast), staying 50 to 100 feet out from the wall below The Flakes.  The first part of Meanderthal climbs a brushy, up-and-left ramp that is 200 yards below (due south from) The Smokestack.  A ten foot high wide crack (the start of the route) allows access to the ramp.
Pitch One, 5.0 (145 feet): Climb the ten foot high wide crack (5.0), then move up and left on the bushy ledge. After 75 feet drop down over a boulder into a flat dirt area at the base of a large chimney/slot (optional belay here). Move left 30 feet onto jumbled boulders. From the top of the boulders a mossy slab leads 20 feet up and over a shoulder (class four). End at another flat dirt area below two large chimneys (with another chimney 50 feet further along).
Pitch Two, 5.5 (110 feet): Move past bushes into a chamber at the base of the largest/central chimney (a huge chockstone looms overhead). A low angle, shallow slot leads 40 feet to a few chimney moves and a stance. Move left around a bulge to a bolt on the left wall, 55 feet from the start of the pitch, and directly under the huge chockstone. Continue up on very smooth rock (possible gear here) between smaller chockstones and through a tight slot onto the tops of the chockstones (optional belay here too). Another 50 feet of nearly level terrain leads to a single belay bolt (behind branches) on the left wall of the right-most chimney.
Pitch Three, 5.5 (100 feet): From the belay bolt, chimney 15 feet onto a large chockstone (the four inch piece is helpful here). Move to and then up a short face with a curved crack/flake on the left (gear). Continue slightly left into another slot/hole under a large chockstone. Finish through this into a meadow.
Pitch Four, Class Three (170 feet): From the right side of the meadow, walk up into the largest, central gully (toward a four foot diameter chockstone that looks like it will impede passage; it's actually passed easily on the left). Continue under overhanging rock to a low angle gully (take class four rock on the left or easier dirt with some brush on the right). This gully leads directly to the six foot diameter chockstone which is described in the approach directions for The Flakes (in the 2007 guidebook, page 226).
FA Party: Jon Cochran, John Cook, Kathy Cook. FA Date: October 4, 2014. Source(s): Email description of route from John Cook, October 13, 2014; ascent of route with John and Kathy Cook, and Tricia Young, November 9, 2014.

564.61  Where’s Waldo  5.10a **  Where’s Waldo is an excellent lead put up by a determined team drilling from stance only.  It is on the north-facing wall below Frothy Flake, 250 feet southeast of The Smokestack.  The route and the wall it climbs can be seen well from near The Lump.  Start the approach from the trail by walking to The Smokestack.  Move around that formation’s east (left) side and into a wide dirt gully/hillside below its south face.   This large gully descends from west-to-east under the steep north side of The Flakes.  From the south side of The Smokestack, move directly across this gully and onto a dirt ramp that leads up-and-left (east).  Continue on this ramp 80 feet up to a saddle with a pine.  From the pine, move down a dirt ramp 70 feet before moving across a band of rock to the right and reaching the base of the climb.  The first bolt of Where’s Waldo is 10 feet off the ground, just up and left of a fractured lodestone.  A second bolt is four feet above that.  The third bolt is in a distinctive four foot by two foot depression/hole in the rock.  From the third bolt, climb left and up past more bolts to a water streak, then up to a two-bolt anchor (a total of seven bolts plus a slung knob protect this 80 foot long first pitch).  The second pitch climbs steep rock past two bolts to a low angle finish at the base of Frothy Flake, 30 feet up.  Continue back 20 feet to a two-bolt anchor.  A 70 meter rope allows a one-rope rappel to the ground from this upper anchor; a 60 meter rope requires two one-rope rappels.  FA Party:  Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran, Bob Walton, Levi Goldman. FA Date: January 12, 2014. Source(s): Discussions about route with Aaron McDonald and Jon Cochran, followed by an ascent of the route on October 26, 2014.

571.81 Quasimodo Pinnacle  5.7 R A1  Quasimodo Pinnacle is a taller formation 80 feet southeast of (uphill from) The Keep.  It is 80 yards from Eggshell (that is, closer to the route Eggshell than is The Keep).  The formation is flanked on its east and west sides by shorter rocks.  It also has a pronounced shoulder on its south side.  Climb the rock immediately west of the main pinnacle (very easy fifth class).  Once on top, throw a rope over the pronounced shoulder.  Secure one end and jumar the rope (the length of this ascent is much shorter on the west side than on the east).  Once on the shoulder, exposed climbing leads a few feet to a bolt.  The summit is just under 15 feet above the bolt.  There are three bolts on the summit, two are very old and one is new.  Chains facilitate the rappel.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Discovery of the lead bolt and a summit bolt by Brad Young, Jim McConachie and Bob Walton, January, 2011.  Subsequent ascent of route by Brad Young and Jim McConachie, February 7, 2011.

571.83  The Keep  5.8 R  The Keep is a 45-foot high, cone-shaped pinnacle found among several other pinnacles in the area between Dragonfly Dome (in The High Peaks) and The Citadel (on The West Side).  The Keep in particular is located on a direct line between Dragonfly Dome and the back of The Citadel, 150 yards from each formation.  It is also about 150 yards due east of The Egg.  The group of pinnacles can be approached either from The High Peaks or from The West Side.  From The High Peaks walk to the base of the route Eggshell (not The Egg, which is a different formation farther east).  From that route continue downhill along the west side of the formation to its lowest point.  Continue from that lowest point west across the hillside.  The first pinnacle in this group is 80 yards from Eggshell and slightly lower in elevation (this first pinnacle has much shorter rocks on its east and west sides and a pronounced shoulder on its south side).  The Keep is below (northwest) of the first pinnacle in this group, 100 yards from Eggshell.  To approach The Keep from The West Side, hike to the back side of The Citadel.  A fairly brush free approach can be made to The Keep and rocks near it from this point, 150 yards uphill along the top of a low ridge.  Also, from the back of The Citadel, looking south (uphill), The Keep and other formations can be seen as follows:  a larger formation, called Sunkist Dome, is visible to the right a little less than 150 yards away (look for a very large, round area of orange lichen high on its north side).  One hundred feet to the left of Sunkist Dome is a 25-foot high pinnacle that blends into the terrain behind it and which is between Sunkist Dome and The Keep.  One hundred more feet to the left of this small rock is The Keep which is fairly uniform in shape, appearing like a steep, upside down cone.  The Keep has a route on its uphill (south) side.  Loose 5.7 leads 12 feet to a basketball-size lodestone.  A few feet past the lodestone is a ledge.  Clip a bolt from this ledge (the bolt is 15 feet up and right of the lodestone).  Crux moves above the bolt lead to a horizontal crack (protection to two inches) and then easier climbing to the summit.  There is a two bolt summit anchor (one bolt is new).  FA Party:  Unknown, but, given the style of climbing and bolting (very solid Star Dryvin bolts including one placed in an incredibly solid lodestone, a one bolt original summit anchor and very bold, runout climbing), possibly Glen Denny and Gary Colliver.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Self, discovery and ascent of previously unreported route (ascent with Jim McConachie and Bob Walton).

571.85  Party of Three  5.7 R  This route is on the southeast side of Sunkist Dome.  Sunkist Dome is 200 feet northwest of The Keep (there is a 25 foot high pinnacle about midway between the two).  Sunkist is named for the large area of bright orange lichen on its north side (easy to see from the back side of The Citadel).  Start Party of Three with 15 feet of class four up a mossy face with holes.  This leads to a broad, flat terrace and the beginning of the roped climbing.  From the terrace, climb 15 feet straight up over holes to a slab (sling a grapefruit-size knob for protection).  An up-and-right crack at the top of the slab takes protection to 1 ½ inches.  Easy moves lead five more feet to a small ledge from which a bolt can be clipped.  Continue up and right in a shallow groove.  Easier moves lead a few feet more to the summit.  There is a two bolt summit anchor (with chains).  FA Party:  Jim McConachie, Brad Young, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  January 15, 2011.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

578.6  The Clump - Feeling Lucky Punk  5.6  This route is on a trailside formation called The Clump.  
The Clump:  The Clump is a multi-summited pinnacle located 80 feet west of The Lump (toward Dragonfly Dome), and 250 feet northeast of The Smokestack.  Its lower elevation, northmost summit rises directly from the southeast side of the High Peaks Trail (the trail is oriented southwest to northeast here).  Two routes climb to its main (south) summit.  Both start on its uphill side.
This Route:  Feeling Luck Punk can almost be seen in the photo on page 232 of the 2007 guidebook - it is directly under The Lump’s route number (579) in that photo.  Look for two bolts on the left side of the southeast face.  Start directly below the first bolt.  Continue 40 feet to a two bolt summit anchor.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date:  December 7, 2013.  Source(s):  Report of the route from Cochran and McDonald (in person), December 14, 2013; subsequent ascent of the route on December 28, 2013.

578.8  The Clump - Scrambler’s Route  Class Four  Scrambler’s Route leads to the top of The Clump’s main, south summit.  Start at the highest point of dirt on The Clump’s east side.  Move a few feet north, over/through a low slot.  Climb a right-facing corner to a slab.  This leads to the summit, 45 feet from the start.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Solo ascent of route, February 14, 2020.

579.1  High Peaks Drifter  5.8  High Peaks Drifter starts 15 feet right of the regular route on The Lump (route 579). Climb past two bolts to join The Lump at its second bolt. Share its last few moves to the summit.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Aaron McDonald.  FA Date:  December 7, 2013.  Source(s):  Report of the route from Cochran and McDonald (in person), December 14, 2013; subsequent ascent of the route on December 28, 2013.

579.5  What I’ve Been Missing Out On  5.7  This route is on the southwest (downhill) face of a formation called Mucci’s Mound.  
Mucci’s Mound:  Mucci’s Mound is a nondescript formation located 150 feet northeast from The Lump and 150 feet south of the High Peaks Trail.  It has a short uphill (north) side which blends into sub-summits and scattered small pinnacles nearby.  The mound’s southeast (downhill) face is much taller.  Both Mucci’s Mound climbing routes are on this face.  Its top, and the end point for both routes, is the farthest southeast summit (the two-bolt anchor there is easy to see from on top of rocks to its north).  Approach the base by hiking down along the east side of the formation (the side opposite The Lump).
This Route:  Start in the middle of the southeast face.  Climb an up-and-right ramp with good protection.  The ramp leads to a straight-up, shallow water chute.  Follow this to a notch near the top of the face.  Move through the notch and up a 10 foot face on the right.  Finish on the Mound’s southeast summit and a two-bolt anchor, 80 feet from the start (the anchor is shared with Joaquin the Dog, listed next).  Descend by rappelling to the northwest 15 feet before walking down a short chute to the east.  Continue down and around to the start.  Gear: small and medium and one 3½ inch piece.  FA Party:  John Godar, Josh Mucci.  FA Date:  January, 2010.  Source(s):  Discussion with Mucci, photo/topo by Godar forwarded by Mucci; ascent of route, February, 2011.  [In.]

579.6  Joaquin the Dog  5.9 R  This serious lead starts 25 feet up and right of What I’ve Been Missing Out On.  Small to medium gear protect climbing to the first bolt, 25 feet up.  Move slightly left to converge momentarily with What I’ve Been Missing Out On.  Continue up and right to the second bolt 15 feet above the first (possible four inch cam between bolts).  Climb a seam straight up (poor quality small gear) before traversing left past a headwall.  Climb up and left to rejoin What I’ve Been Missing Out On (small to medium cams to the left of the headwall). Finish on that route, through the notch and up to the two-bolt anchor.  FA Party:  Jeremy Hadland, Jon Cochran.  FA Date:  January 2014.  (These first ascentionists did the route with no prior knowledge about the route What I’ve Been Missing Out On.)  Source(s):  Discussion and ascent of the route with Jon Cochran on October 26, 2014.

591.9  Tea Bag  5.3  Fifty feet south of the south side of Teapot Dome are two separate, much smaller pinnacles.  Tea Bag is the larger of these two, the one farther downhill (to the west). Although the west (downhill) side of this formation is fairly tall (over 100 feet), its east (uphill) side is only 35 feet high. Climb this east side (mossy and unprotected) to the summit. Descend by down-climbing or by a Pinnacles rappel. FA Party: David and Jerry Harden. FA Date: 1974. Source(s): Discussion about the route with David Harden while hiking by it; inspection of the route with John Cook and Alan Nilsson in January, 2016 (it was dripping water and too wet to climb), followed by another discussion with Harden to repeat details; ascent of route with John Cook, April 18, 2016.

612.5 Dare to Declare  5.6 *  This route provides surprisingly easy access to Proclamation Pinnacle’s north summit.  It climbs a slab-to-buttress located between the routes Proclamation Pinnacle - South Summit and Proclamation Pinnacle - North Summit Regular Route.  Thirty feet of easy movement leads to a bolt.  Move left and then up to a lodestone and a second bolt.  Wide stemming to the left leads to a third bolt.  Chimney to a fourth bolt before climbing up and right to join North Summit Regular Route well below its only bolt.  Finish on that route.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 25, 2019.  Source(s):  Emails from John Cook on May 26, 2019, and June 4, 2019; telephone discussion with him to clarify description on June 4, 2019; ascent of route with Gavin Emmons, November 12, 2019.

616.8  The Short Ribs - High Point  5.6  The Short Ribs are the closest-to-the-trail formation in The Partway Pinnacles.
The Partway Pinnacles:  The Partway Pinnacles are north of the eastmost part of the High Peaks Trail.  They straddle the northmost extension of the High Peaks ridge crest, and are between 150 and 200 yards north of the trail (and from 300 to 350 yards south of Squareblock Rock).  Routes are described in the order in which they are approached.
This Route:  The Short Ribs are a series of seven thin, low, south to north oriented pinnacles located just west of the low rocks where far north approaches diverge.  The east side of the formation is 80 feet from these low rocks.  The third pinnacle from the east is the high point (this point and its two-bolt summit anchor are easy to see from the low rocks).  Approach by walking around the formation’s north side to a slot on the high point’s east side.  Scramble up to and then past the slot’s high point.  Chimney to a very shallow alcove six feet up.  Sling knobs here protect the route’s crux.  Easier climbing leads to the summit 30 feet from the start.  A two-bolt anchor allows a 25 foot rappel to the starting slot.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 28, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, the first ascentionist.

617.1  Placid Nirvana  Class Four  Placid Nirvana is the larger, more squat pinnacle, 40 feet north of Peace of Heaven.  Its west side is 45 feet high.  Placid Nirvana’s east side is even higher and nearly vertical.  From its west side, move northeast up a short corridor to a groove and then a grassy patch.  Finish up the low angle, but terrifically exposed north arete to the summit.  There is no top anchor.  Descend by downclimbing.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Solo ascent of route, February 14, 2020.

617.2  Betsy  5.7  Betsy is a rounded, 30 foot high pinnacle located 25 feet north of the north end of Placid Nirvana.  Climb a left-facing corner on the left side of its west face.  This leads 20 feet to a shoulder and a (directional) bolt.  Move right (south) to a second bolt that protects boulder moves onto the summit.  A two-bolt anchor allows a rappel off the west side.  Gear: one fixed pin, ¾ to 1½ inch, and two bolts.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jennifer Wang.  FA Date:  March 14, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

617.6  Plateau Pinnacle  5.6  Plateau Pinnacle is the farthest northwest Partway Pinnacle.  It is 200 feet north of The Short Ribs and 400 feet west-northwest from Placid Nirvana.  Although Plateau Pinnacle is close to The Short Ribs, brushy class three and four slots make a direct approach difficult.  Instead, approach from Placid Nirvana.  Start by viewing Plateau Pinnacle from the High Peaks ridge crest just southwest of Placid Nirvana.  Note first an unusually round formation 200 feet away.  Plateau Pinnacle is to the right of the round rock from this view point.  Its top is slightly lower in elevation than the ridge crest.  Walk 100 feet north (downhill) past Placid Nirvana’s northwest side (between it and a series of smaller rocks).  Turn to the west and traverse to Plateau Pinnacle, losing some elevation while staying just north of a series of small pinnacles (one of which is the round rock).  Reach the highest point of dirt on Plateau’s southeast side.  Move through a short class three slot to a large, nearly level plateau that is the top of the formation’s main mass.  Move to the southeast side of the 45 foot high summit mound.  Start left of a water streak, above a huge drop off to the left.  Gear in a horizontal crack protects moves to a bolt.  Move up to another horizontal crack (both cracks take multiple ¾ to 1¼ inch each).  Finish on the summit.  A two-bolt anchor allows a rappel back to the plateau.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Vicki Young.  FA Date:  February 16, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.


WEST SIDE

627.8  Dollar a Day and Found  5.0 R  Dollar a Day and Found is located on a quite out-of-the-way formation called Rustler’s Roost.
Rustler’s Roost:  Rustler’s Roost is located northwest of Balconies Trail, due west of Passion Play Slab and The Shepherd.  It is approached from a point closer to West Side parking than either of these formations and so it appears on this list before them.  Get to Rustler’s Roost from Balconies Trail, starting 500 feet before/west of The Shepherd.  The formation can be seen from the trail here, it is gently uphill, 400 yards to the left/northwest (and, as can be seen from this point, Rustler’s Roost is actually two adjacent formations; the rock to the west/left is about half again as large as the one to the right).  After leaving the trail, move 100 feet across a flat, grassy area to a stream drainage.  Cross this and then start upslope in and along a subsidiary drainage, staying well to the west of a scruffy, 40 foot high formation located 150 feet from the trail.  Continue along and up the subsidiary drainage, through gaps in brush, directly to Rustler’s Roost.
Dollar a Day and Found:  Dollar a Day and Found climbs the northeast face of Rustler’s Roost’s east/right formation.  Start up and left in a slight groove (the ground drops away as a climber moves higher).  Clip the route’s only bolt and continue up and left past a short section of loose rock.  Finish on the summit, 40 feet from the start.  There is a single anchor bolt 10 feet back (its origin is unknown).  Belay using the bolt and body position.  Walk off.  FA Party:  John Cook.  FA Date:  February 23, 2018.  Source(s):  February 26, 2018, email from John Cook regarding new routes; solo ascent of route on April 20, 2018.

629.1  See Ya Crater Alligator  5.5 R  A longer slab climb that traverses a good part of Passion Play Wall.  Start at the base of Passion Play but move up and right toward the largest and lowest of several big lodestones.  Climb up slightly from the lodestone to the route’s first bolt.  Continue up and right to the second of two large, shallow scoops and the second bolt (staying well below the “time bomb,” a beach-ball sized, hanging, fractured lodestone).  Move right and up again to a point below the right side of a large, up-and-left oriented scoop/ramp.  Climb to the scoop/ramp’s upper left end and the third bolt which protects crux moves over a bulge.  A fourth bolt protects the final section of the climb to a two-bolt anchor 105 feet from the start.  Walk off left.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  October 12, 2017.  Source(s):  Post to Mud'nCrud forum thread “Quest for Mud (Special Edition),” by John Cook, October 13, 2017; ascent of route with Kathy Cook, Shawn Shafai, Julie Nordquist, December 16, 2017.

640.1 The Wolf 5.7 R  Start as for The Lamb, on The Shepherd. Clip the bolt on that route and immediately move right up a (different) low angle chute aiming for a large lodestone 20 feet above. Small gear (a bomber small/medium nut and a small cam) can be placed on the right side of the lodestone. Continue straight up 12 feet to a good stance and a second bolt. Fifteen feet of sustained, and run out 5.7 leads to a mantle onto a large block (The Microwave Mantle). A third bolt is five feet above the block. Move slightly right and then up to a stance just below a headwall. Clip a fourth bolt (it is six feet above the third bolt, but it is in a scoop, and is invisible from the start). The route ends where it connects to the normal Shepherd walk-off. One bolt was placed for an anchor. It is on the "walk-off" side of the sub-pinnacle near where the route ends. Use it with body-position for a belay. All bolts are Rawl, 3/8 inch x 3 1/4 inch; all were placed from stance. FA Party: Josh Mucci (roped solo). FA Date: February 20 2009. Source(s): Emails from first ascentionist, subsequent ascent of route.

646.2 Tear and Share  5.10a R  This route starts ten feet right of Elephant Rock - Regular Route, above where the ridge of rock used in the approach meets the main formation. A single belay bolt on the ridge of rock protects an exposed start. Three closely spaced bolts on loose rock then lead to an easier but quite loose runout. After 25 feet, reach the top of the small buttress where Regular Route's chimney section ends. Join Regular Route there to finish (don't forget a few one to three inch pieces with which to protect that part of the climb).  FA Party: Bob Walton, Aaron McDonald, Jon Cochran. FA Date: March 8, 2014. Source(s): Emails and descriptions of the route from the first ascentionists, subsequent ascent of route with Noal Elkins on December 28, 2014.

672.7  Agent Orange 5.4  This line looks nice from a distance, but is, unfortunately, fairly loose. The climb is located southwest of The Flumes on the same formation as is the route Lately Found (they go to the same summit). Climb this pinnacle's low-angle, southeast buttress (starting from its lowest point). Four bolts protect 110 feet of climbing to a two bolt summit anchor (the old bolt that served as an anchor for Lately Found was replaced). Ten feet of class three lead off the top on the north side of the rock.  FA Party: John and Kathy Cook, Noal Elkins, Brad and Tricia Young.  FA Date:  December 28, 2014.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

698.2  Where the Sun Don’t Shine  5.6  Where the Sun Don’t Shine is the left-most route at The Upper Flumes.  The Upper Flumes is the distinct, separate apron of rock extending almost 200 feet right from the route Lichen to Lead (route number 698 in the 2007 guidebook).  Start this route (and the route Masters of Mischief) up a slight but noticeable up-and-left ramp.  The first bolt on Where the Sun Don’t Shine is well up this ramp just before a mossy water streak.  Five more bolts lead straight up then up-and-left into the water streak (really good rock, but lots of moss). Finish at a two-bolt anchor, 100 feet from the start.  The fifth bolt and the anchor are hard to see from below.  Longer runners on the upper bolts help prevent rope drag.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Kathy Cook, Noal Elkins.  FA Date:  January 24, 2015.  Source(s):  Description text and topo from John Cook; subsequent ascent of route with Aaron McDonald. Click here for a topo to all five of the new Upper Flumes routes.

698.31  You Can’t Fool MoM  5.6  Start from Where the Sun Don’t Shine’s top anchor. Move up and left 15 feet to a bolt below a bulge.  Continue left and up 15 feet to join the final pitch of Lichen to Lead where that pitch includes a noticeable series of big knobs.  Walk off as for that route.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 12, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on June 4, 2019; telephone discussion with him to clarify description on same day.

698.32  Feet to the Fire  5.7  This climb also starts from the top anchor for Where the Sun Don’t Shine. Climb straight up the water chute past 3 bolts in 30 feet.  Twenty feet of easy class five to the right of the chute leads to easier ground. Scramble and then walk another 30 feet to a two-bolt anchor on the left wall. Walk off as for Bolt Bandit.  FA Party: John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  May 7, 2019.  Source(s):  Email from John Cook on June 4, 2019; telephone discussion with him to clarify description on same day.  

698.4  Masters of Mischief  5.7 *  Start this route on the same slight, up-and-left ramp as Where the Sun  Don’t Shine.  After 25 feet, move straight up to a bolt.  Five more bolts lead to a two-bolt anchor with chains 90 feet up.  FA Party:  John Cook, Jon Cochran, Bob Walton, Noal Elkins, Robert Behrens, Kathy Cook, Lisa Lee.  FA Date:  January 17, 2015.  Source(s):  Description text and topo from John Cook; subsequent ascent of route with John Cook.

698.5  Bolt Bandit  5.7  This climb starts from the Masters of Mischief anchor.  Very easy climbing leads right 15 feet to a bolt which protects moves over a roof/headwall (long reach to a hole).  Continue past two more bolts to a flat area and a two-bolt anchor on the left, below the summit of The Flumes.  Class three ramps lead to the top of the formation and then to the third class descent off the north side.  Pro: three bolts and (optionally) gear to 1 ½ inches (for the traverse).  FA Party:  Noal Elkins, Bob Walton, Lisa Lee.  FA Date:  January 17, 2015.  Source(s):  Description text and topo from John Cook; subsequent ascent of route with Gavin Emmons.

698.6  Self-Selecting Substrate  5.6 *  Start 30 feet right of Masters of Mischief.  Climb 30 feet to a headwall and the first bolt.  Move up and right over the headwall.  Four more bolts lead to a two-bolt anchor with chains.  FA Party:  Robert Behrens, Jon Cochran, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  January 17, 2015.  Source(s):  Description text and topo from John Cook; subsequent ascent of route with John Cook.

698.7  Where the Sun Shines  5.7 *  Start a few feet right of Self-Selecting Substrate.  Climb up and slightly right, 25 feet to a bolt.  Continue past four more bolts to a two-bolt anchor shared with Self-Selecting Substrate.  FA Party:  Jon Cochran, Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  December 28, 2014.  Source(s):  Description text and topo from John Cook; subsequent ascent of route with John Cook.

703.5  Seven Year Itch  5.2  This route is the easiest way to the top of Point Five Pinnacle in The Crowley Towers.  It's a long, mountaineering-style route with some exposure, in a very scenic location.  As such, it makes a good route on which to introduce novices to climbing.  Start in the corridor between Point Five and Tower One, 100 feet northwest (climber's right/downhill) from route 703, Point Five Pinnacle - Northeast Face.  A belay bolt above the quickly-steepening corridor protects the start.  Move around, right and then slightly up to a large, mossy hole and the route's first bolt 20 feet from the start.  Continue up the formation's long, low-angle northwest buttress (class three).  Pass a second bolt partway through a slightly steeper section. More easy ground leads to a sub-summit.  Easy fifth class protected by a third bolt leads around the right side of this feature.  A fourth bolt just past the sub-summit acts as a directional for a follower. Continue, now class three again, to the summit and a two-bolt anchor, 185 feet from the start.  Descend by a 50 foot rappel from the two-bolt anchor for Northeast Face (this anchor is 20 feet to the left on the last part of the ascent and is easily visible from the summit, 45 feet down to the north).  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  December 23, 2018.  Source(s):  Description of route from the base by John Cook on January 3, 2019, followed by an ascent of it immediately thereafter.

705.5  Third Time’s a Charm  5.8  This route, and its companion, Exit Stage Right (listed next) are located on the south corner of Tower Three, immediately above the obvious approach gap between Tower Two and Tower Three.  Walk ten feet up and right in a low-angle slot and onto a low shoulder of rock.  A few class four moves up and left on a ramp lead to another, higher shoulder.  Climb straight up past three closely spaced bolts.  Crux moves up and slightly left past the last bolt lead to the summit and a two-bolt anchor.  Descend by making a 45 foot rappel.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook, Brad Young.  FA Date:  January 3, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

705.6  Exit Stage Right  5.7  Climb Third Time's a Charm to its third bolt.  Move right on a ramp to a fourth bolt and then a little further right before moving up onto Tower Three's summit.  FA Party:  John Cook, Kathy Cook.  FA Date:  January 2, 2019.  Source(s): Description of route from the base by John Cook on January 3, 2019, followed by an ascent of it immediately thereafter.

707.3  Manatee  5.3  This route is on a formation that is behind (north of) Sub Three Pinnacle (it isn’t shown on the map on page 282). There is a 20 foot, grassy corridor between the north side of Sub Three and the south side of Manatee (although the route isn't on this side of Manatee, it is on its north side, which is about 60 feet away from Sub Three).  Solo Manatee's north face.  Steeper moves down low are the route crux; they are followed by scrambling to the top, and a one-bolt anchor 35 feet from the start. The route involves about 35 feet of climbing total.  Descend a short, class four groove on the formation's northeast side.   FA Party:  Aaron McDonald, John Cook (near-simultaneous free solos).  FA Date:  January 5, 2013.  Source(s):  Emails with John Cook, January 7 and January 8, 2013.

708.5  S Curve 5.7 This route climbs an "S" pattern of rock on the southwest corner of Tower Four (the route S Curve is on the opposite side of Tower Four from Route 708). The route, and the S pattern, can be seen very well while standing between Tower Three and Sub Three Pinnacle (look east). Approach from the north/uphill side of Tower Four, along that tower's northwest side, to the top of two large chockstones and a shoulder of rock on the southwest side of Tower Four (the 80 foot approach is class three, with maybe a class four move or two). Use a bolt on the shoulder of rock for a belay anchor (above a chimney). Start climbing in a crack that curves up and left (gear from one to two inches). Two bolts protect moves to a stance on the south side of the tower. One more bolt protects moves onto the summit. A two bolt anchor is 15 feet back from the route's top-out point. This anchor allows a rappel down the northwest side of the formation. FA Party: John and Kathy Cook, Brad Young, Bob Walton.  FA Date:  November 17, 2013.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.

709.1  Crowley Tower - Tower Five - The Two Hundred Pound Club  5.0 R  The north side of Tower Five is a broad, low angle face.  The standard, class two route is on the right (west) edge of this face.  This newer route ascends a clean water chute in the middle of that face (about 50 feet to the left/east of the class two route).  Forty five feet, no protection.  FA Party:  Tyler Martin and Josh Mucci (simultaneous free solo).  FA Date:  January 10, 2010.  Source(s):  Discussion with first ascent parties; subsequent ascent of route.

709.5  Cover Girl  5.8 *  This route is in a water streak on the west-facing cliff directlyabove and several hundred feet farther back (northeast) from If We Bolt It They Will Come.  Approach from near the Crowley Towers/Balconies saddle, through a prominent notch between small ridges, down to the base of the route.  Six bolts lead up and then up and slightly right to a two bolt anchor 95 feet above the ground.  FA Party:  Steve and Laura Dawson, Brad Young, Deborah MacKay.  FA Date:  December 9, 2012.  Source(s):  Self, part of first ascent party.
Here is a photo topo that shows this route and others nearby (the photo was taken from West Side parking).

709.91  Balconies Bumps - Second Bump   Class Four The Balconies Bumps are a series of small to medium size pinnacles located between The Crowley Towers and the upper edge of the upper tier of The Balconies.  Use the same approach as for Crowley Towers, but 200 yards before (south) of them, at an obvious saddle in a low ridge, stop.  Turn away from the towers at this point, sharply right (southeast).  The Balconies Bumps are to the southeast, spread out in an area 100 to 200 yards away.  This route is on the south face of the north-most significant bump (the one closest to The Crowley Towers; there is one bump farther north but it is only 10 feet high).  Start from the notch on the south side of this pinnacle.  Climb 25 feet to the summit.  Descend by downclimbing.  The summit has also been reached from other sides of the bump.  FA Party:  Unknown, possibly Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  Unknown, possibly December 28, 2009.  Source(s):  Posting to Mud'nCrud Forum December 29, 2009; subsequent inspection and ascent of route with first ascent author.

709.92  Balconies Bumps - Balconies Balls  5.3  This route is on the north face of the next bump south of the class four route on Balconies Bumps - Second Bump (the routes start in the same notch “back to back,” four feet from each other).  Climb an obvious, quite knobby face 25 feet to the summit.  Walk off.  FA Party:  Unknown, possibly Robert Behrens.  FA Date:  Unknown, possibly December 28, 2009.  Source(s):  Posting to Mud'nCrud Forum December 29, 2009; subsequent inspection and ascent of route with first ascent author.

709.93  The Back Nine  5.10a **  The Back Nine is the left-most route of three routes on the tallest and southeast-most of The Balconies Bumps.  This bump is 50 yards southeast of Balconies Bumps - South Route (this is also 150 yards southeast of the lowest point on the ridge which is between The Crowley Towers and the top of The Balconies).  The Back Nine climbs past nine bolts on mostly good rock and fabulous holes to a spectacular finish.  This route shares a two bolt anchor with Keller Arete and The 800 Club. Pro: bolts only (nine of them).  FA Party:  Brad Young, Jim McConachie, Jeff Lane, Tonya Nilsson.  FA Date:  December 3, 2011.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

709.94  The Keller Arete  5.8  The blunt arete right of The Back Nine and left of The 800 Club. Start 15 feet up and right of the absolute toe of the arete. Cams in holes (to 1 ¼ inch) protect the first 20 feet to a bolt. Four more bolts protect climbing to the top of the arete and then to the same anchor as The 800 Club. The crux is above the fourth bolt and that bolt is hard to see - it is to the right of the center of the arete and somewhat hidden in a pocket. Walk off. FA Party: Brad Young, Robert Behrens, Bob Walton, Phil Keller, Josh Mucci. FA Date: December 11, 2010. Source: Self, part of the first ascent party.

709.95  The 800 Club  5.7 *  This route is in a water chute on the northeast face of a large pinnacle 50 yards southeast  of Balconies Bumps - Second Bump (this is also 150 yards southeast of the lowest point on the ridge which is between The Crowley Towers and the top of The Balconies).  The face is 75 feet high (this is the tallest and southeast-most of The Balconies Bumps).  Climb the obvious shallow and steepening water chute; two pieces of gear to three inches protect easy moves to the first bolt.  Continue past two more bolts to a low angle, run-out class four finish.  Two anchor bolts are 15 feet left (south) of the top of the chute.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Josh Mucci, Steve Ochinang, Robert Behrens, Tyler Martin, Tricia Young, Phil Keller, Brent Keller, Kristin Keller, Robert Walton, Jim McConachie, Joe Hornof, Jeff Lane.  FA Date:  January 10, 2010.  Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

711.2  Gold Line  5.9 R *  This route ascends a water streak that starts well up and right of If We Bolt It They Will Come (it starts near the top of the up-and-right ramp that makes up the first pitch of the route Desperate Abandon). Climb a deep water streak/chute which cannot be seen well from the ground.  Three bolts protect 50 feet of climbing to a two bolt anchor on the right. FA Party: Alan Nilsson, Brad Young, Jim McConachie, Dennis Erik S.  FA Date:  December 18, 2011.  Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.
Here is a photo topo that shows this route and others nearby (the photo was taken from West Side parking).

711.3  Desperate Abandon 5.6 R  This route starts just right of If We Bolt It They Will Come.  Move up a long, wide, up-and-right class three and four ramp (the start of the ramp is shown on the topo as “mossy slab” on page 286 of the guidebook).  After three hundred feet, pass a very deep water streak on the left.  Belay at a single bolt on the main wall, above/to the right of and outside of the streak.  From this belay, continue up the ramp, which narrows and eventually becomes a face.  There is one bolt 35 feet up this second pitch - right where the wall gets steeper.  Sustained 5.6 climbing leads past the bolt and then to the right, into a gully.  There is no summit anchor. Walk off the the northwest (under the route Cover Girl), or move down to the bolt anchor for the route Gold Line and rappel back to the class three and four ramp. (This climb was discovered because of a long length of 7/16 inch Goldline which was visible for years, fixed on the route, hanging from the upper bolt to the top of the cliff where it was left “lassoed” over a horn.)  FA Party:  Unknown. FA Date: Unknown. Source(s): Self, discovery of old bolts in 2010, ascent of route with Jim McConachie, December 2011.
Here is a photo topo that shows this route and others nearby (the photo was taken from West Side parking).

711.6  The Inn Crowd  5.6 **  The Inn Crowd starts 100 yards to the south (climber's right) of If We Bolt It They Will Come. It starts to the right of the class three/four ramp which leads up to the routes Desperate Abandon and Gold Line. Look for a slight, up-and-right weakness/ramp that allows passage between upper and lower rotten headwalls. The first bolt on the route can be seen about 20 feet above the ground (the climbing to this bolt is very easy). A total of ten bolts on the first pitch (5.6) lead up and right (at about a 45 degree angle). It is 115 feet to a three bolt belay on a beach ball size lodestone (bring and use slings on this pitch). The second pitch continues right past one bolt and then continues straight up past five more to another three bolt anchor (5.5, six bolts total on this pitch). It is 75 feet from the top of the first pitch to the top of the second. Descend by scrambling down the Desperate Abandon ramp (start with a very exposed scramble from the second pitch bolt anchor onto the ramp), or by rappel. Note, while this route can be rappelled with one rope, and while the rappel from the top of the second pitch to the top of the first is only 75 feet, the rappel from the top of the first pitch to the ground is 118 feet (the last 50 of which are completely overhanging) and this second rappel requires a 70 meter rope! The Inn Crowd is a very sunny climb; it's in the sun from early morning until the sun sets. It is a good route for cold days. Finally, two further items of explanation: First, the second pitch of this route ends at a stance on a steeper section of wall just below the ramp and about 20 feet below the one protection bolt on the route Desperate Abandon. The route ends here so that no bolts were added to or within sight of Desperate Abandon and so that the well protected nature of The Inn Crowd was not "diluted" by joining/finishing on the fairly run out upper part of that route. Second, the well protected nature of The Inn Crowd should be understood (and forgiven) since the combined ages of the first ascentionists exceed 350 years. FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook, Tricia Young, Joel Primrose, Alan Nilsson, Dennis Erik S, Jim McConachie. FA Date: January 5, 2014. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.
Here is a photo topo that shows this route and others nearby (the photo was taken from West Side parking).
And here is a topo which gives more detail.

711.7 The Brosseau Finish  5.7 **  This route is an alternate second pitch for The Inn Crowd. Climb The Inn Crowd's first pitch and then start up its second pitch. At the third bolt of that pitch, move right, past one bolt and then into the obvious water streak. Four more bolts and one very good slung knob protect climbing in the streak (eight bolts total for the pitch). At the top of the streak, exit right and continue eight feet more to a two bolt anchor. Descend by making a short (45 foot) rappel to the top of the second pitch of The Inn Crowd (and continue down from there). FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook, Kathy Cook. FA Date: January 12, 2014. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.
Here is a photo topo that shows this route and others nearby (the photo was taken from West Side parking).
And here is a topo which gives more detail.

714.2  Send in the  Clowns  5.7 R  This route is located on the slab down and right of Premeditated, and below the long traverse of Where the Birds Hang.  It starts 90 feet up from the bend in the trail where that trail comes closest to The Balconies.  Class four leads up and right on a slight ramp (below a sloping ledge/shallow alcove).  Stay below a prominent 30 inch, up-and-left slanting, rectangular lodestone.  A five inch cam in a hole then protects moves up-and-left to the first bolt (it is 55 feet from the start of the route and 10 feet above the 30 inch lodestone).  Move up-and-right 10 feet to a second bolt.  Holes and one more bolt lead to a two-bolt anchor 90 feet up.  FA Party:  Josh Mucci, Robert Behrens, Jeff Lane.  FA Date:  2011.  Source(s):  Extensive telephone discussions with Robert Behrens before an ascent of the route with Roger Putnam on November 23, 2014.  

722.5 Full Circle  5.10d **  This route is located in a water streak on The Balconies southeast face, to the right of The Powers That Be and to the left of Electric Blue.  This water streak is shown on page 291 of the 2007 guidebook. The topo on that page shows two bolts low in the streak (those two bolts were placed in the early 1980s and the line was abandoned after that). The climb consists now of three pitches. On the first pitch (5.10b), twelve bolts lead first straight up, and then to the right of the streak, before moving to the left across it and then sharply right back into it. Finish the pitch 90 feet up at a two-bolt belay on top of huge lodestones. Pitch two (5.10d) starts on the route's well-protected, crux headwall. A total of ten bolts on this pitch lead 80 feet to a two-bolt anchor at a stance. Pitch three (5.10b) starts with a crux past two bolts. Continue into a low-angle, scoop area and a third bolt. A fourth bolt above protects a second crux onto a magnificent, huge (six foot diameter) lodestone. Two more bolts protect the pitch's third crux to the top of the cliff and a two-bolt anchor, 70 feet from its start. Full Circle ends here (this anchor is at the top of the cliff). Note too that the first ascent party also installed a "fourth anchor" that isn't really part of the climb, but is above/behind it. This additional two-bolt anchor is located 55 feet mostly-horizontal feet back from the top of Full Circle's third and last pitch, at the base of the next tier of The Balconies. This location is also 150 feet right (south) and slightly up from the top anchor of the route Lava Falls (but again at the base of the next tier back). The anchor was installed to allow parties to rappel down this part of The Balconies with one rope (one 55 foot walk/rappel from the anchor on the upper/next tier leads to the top of Full Circle's third pitch, and three one-rope rappels continue from there to the ground). FA Party: Gavin Emmons, Brad Young, Alacia Welch, Janice Hirata. FA Date: December 11, 2018. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

740.5  Somewhere  5.6 R *  Reported long ago to David Rubine by Jon Cochran (as part of Salinas Valley Mountaineering), by way of a letter and a “map.”  Jon wrote, “lies on low angle somewhat flaky face to the right of Nexus.  Maybe 4+/- bolts.”  Bolts reported as 2 ¼ inch Star Dryvin.  No rating given.  FA Party: Crile Carvey, Jon Cochran. FA Date:  1984. Source(s):  Correspondence by Jon Cochran to David Rubine, given November, 2008 by Rubine to Young as part of huge box of old archival material.
EDIT, December 14, 2008: The route is 5.6 R *. It is 500 feet right (northeast) of Nexus, right of steep, broken cliffs and 70 feet right of a tiered water streak. Look for an obvious, low-angle, but high slab. Four bolts, the first 30 feet up, the fourth 100 feet up. Continue straight up past the fourth bolt, using several OK slung knobs for additional protection. It is 170 feet to the rim. No belay anchors, use body position. The walk down descent described for Nexus ('07 guidebook, page 297) starts 150 feet to the right (northeast) from where the climb ends. Additional source: ascent by Brad Young and Erik Bratton.

755.3  The Invitation  Class Four  The Invitation is the first route encountered at the area called Block Party when hiking outbound (northeast) on Balconies Cliff Trail.
Block Party:  Block Party is a group of three huge boulders located on both sides of Balconies Cliff Trail, 100 feet east of the far right side of The Balconies’ front tier (out from the route Stiletto and from the Echoes corridor).  These boulders are up to 50 feet high and, in places, are square-cut enough to be called blocks.  Find them 400 yards past (north) of the Balconies’ approach trail exit near Smiling Simian.  The Balconies Cliff Trail is oriented exactly south to north just before Block Party and makes a 90 degree right turn (to the east) in the middle of it.  One huge block is located on the east and south edge of the trail at this turn; two others are 50 feet north of it.
The Invitation:  The block located south and east of the trail is steep-to-undercut on all sides except the west (the side that rises from the trail).  That side consists of a 35 foot high, mossy, class four slab.  The middle of the slab is the least mossy.  Climb directly from the trail to the top of the boulder.  There is no summit anchor; descend by downclimbing.  FA Party:  Unknown.  FA Date:  Unknown.  Source(s):  Various ascents of route looking for evidence that it had been climbed before, culminating in another inspection of it November 25, 2019.

755.4  Hey Neighbor  5.5  Two of the blocks that make up Block Party are located north of Balconies Cliff Trail. Hey Neighbor summits the north block.
Block Party North of the Trail: The two Block Party boulders north of the trail are aligned south to north.  They are separated by a southeast-to-northwest oriented, three to five foot wide, 65 foot long corridor/chimney. The south edge of the south block is 60 feet from the trail.
Hey Neighbor:  Hey Neighbor climbs the north block 50 feet to a spacious but oddly loose, brushy and dirty summit.  The start of the route is 10 feet into the chimney from its northwest end.  Two bolts on the north block’s south side protect climbing up and left to the start of a class four slab.  Follow this to the top (sling knobs).  A two-bolt anchor on the summit’s west end allows a rappel directly to the corridor’s northwest entrance.  FA Party:  Brad Young, Tricia Young.  FA Date:  November 25, 2019.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

769.5  The Jungle Slab - Original Route  5.8 R  The Jungle Slab is a large, mossy, east facing slab, north of Thundering Herd, 100 yards north of the metal gangway encountered when hiking north out of the Balconies Caves.  It is also 150 feet south of the Balconies Cliff/Balconies Cave trail junction.  In 2010, a huge oak fell down from right in front of The Jungle Slab routes; its fallen trunk now points directly at the start of Original Route.  Obvious third class leads up six feet to ledges from which this and the next route start.  Original Route climbs the slot which is above the ledge.  The slot has sections of loose rock.  It protects with one one inch cam, one five inch cam and two fixed pitons.  An ancient bolt at the top of the slot then protects moves to the right, six feet, to a second bolt.   From the second bolt easy slab climbing leads 20 feet up and right to an obvious, large hole/shallow alcove and a third bolt.  Slab climbing then continues 30 feet up and slightly left to a fourth (ancient) bolt.  Fifteen more feet of slab lead straight up to a large ledge and the end of the climbing.  A pine 10 feet left of the top-out provides a belay anchor.  It is 98 feet from this pine to the start ledge.  It appears that this route was originally an aid climb and that aid pitons were used to get to the top of the slot (the amount of loose rock in and around the slot in 2010 was not indicative of prior free climbing, but apparent pin-scars and the bolt pattern above the slot indicate that the route had been climbed).  Also the second bolt was replaced in December, 2008 by Brad Young; the replacement bolt was positioned approximately six inches from the original bolt.  The third bolt was also replaced in December, 2008 by Brad Young.  Due to rock quality, this replacement bolt was placed 18 inches from the original bolt.  FA Party: Unknown.  FA Date: Unknown, but likely between 1965 and 1980.  Source(s):  Self, discovery of old bolts in 2007, ascent of route with Dennis Erik S and Phillip Keller, March, 2010.

769.51  The Jungle Slab - Dysentery Direct  5.8 R  Third class up to the same ledge from which Original Route starts.  Move twenty feet right of Original Route to a large lodestone which is 18 feet above the ground.  Belay here from one old bolt.  From the lodestone, climb to a second bolt 10 feet higher.  Move past this bolt to a ledge (5.8, mossy).  Move left on the ledge.  Slung knobs and several two to four inch cams protect a second crux directly below the second bolt of Original Route.  A fall from this second crux would be serious; the cams and slung knobs gain some quality only by their quantity.  It appears that this route was started but never completed (ample loose rock, the very bad - before replacement - quality of the second bolt, plus the extreme seriousness of the second crux all make it seem nearly certain that the party that placed the two bolts then abandoned the route).  The second bolt was replaced by Phillip Keller on March 7, 2010 (the original bolt pulled out with almost no effort).  FA Party:  Dennis Erik S., Brad Young, Phillip Keller.  FA Date: March 7, 2010.  Source(s): Self, discovery of old bolts in 2007, ascent of route with Dennis Erik S and Phillip Keller, March, 2010.

815.4 Los Banditos 5.9 A1 **  The natural continuation of the Bandits in Bondage pitches. Four pitches. Approach via the first pitch of the route The West Face (route # 811). Fifty feet past the end of this pitch (to the north, The West Face traverses after its first pitch) is a small meadow. Los Banditos starts from this meadow, 100 feet right of the start of Rock Around the Clock. Pitch One (60 feet): start on a small pedestal of rock. Six aid bolts on an overhanging face lead up and left to a small roof which is at the bottom of a water streak. Two more aid bolts lead over the roof. Intimidating free moves from the eighth bolt (5.9) lead to a ledge and one directional bolt. The first pitch anchor is 5 feet to the right. Pitch Two (110 feet): This excellent pitch continues up the obvious water chute past 10 bolts (10 includes the directional from the first pitch). Getting into the chute is 5.9; two bulges higher in the chute are also each 5.9. The pitch finishes with 15 feet of easy slab to a stance and a two bolt belay.  Pitch Three (195 feet): Continue up the chute past five bolts on increasingly easy and runout climbing. The crux is after the second bolt (5.7). Large knobs can be slung for additional protection. One hundred fifty feet up, the chute branches. Take the straight up branch (that is, don't take the branch to the left). A two bolt anchor is obvious on a low angle slab, 30 feet below the bottom of the water chute which is descended as part of the Old Original Rappel Bypass variation (route # 836).  Pitch Four (90 feet): Climb the deeper chute which is 30 feet left (north) of the chute which makes up the Rappel Bypass (these chutes are obvious on page 338 of the guidebook). Small cams (the only gear on the route) can be used to protect the moves into the chute (5.5); the chute then becomes class three and four (and can be further protected by slung knobs). End on the top of Machete Ridge, at a pine which is 30 feet from the end of Old Original's third pitch. FA Party: Jim McConachie, Brad Young, Erik Bratton, Dennis Erik S. FA Date: December 6, 2009 (route was started in October, 2007). Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.
Click on this link for a revised topo from page 326 of the book. It has been modified to show Los Banditos.

824.1 Are You Inexperienced  5.7  Start this route 12 feet right of route 824, Shortly Tooloose. Three bolts lead up and right (follow an up-and-right seam/shallow corner) to a nice stance on a large lodestone. Two more bolts lead up and left to a bolt anchor 55 feet from the ground (this anchor consists of an odd, pre-existing, previously unused, two-bolt combination and one new bolt with chain). Although there is some good climbing on this well protected route, its upper part crosses the band of rotten rock that is so prominent on this part of The Machete (and it's pretty rotten here). FA Party: Kevin DeWeese, Brad Young. FA Date: December 15, 2013. Source(s): Self, part of the first ascent party.

839.5  Butcher Block  5.3 R *  Butcher Block is a large, multi-summited pinnacle located 250 yards northeast (uphill) from Cleaver Buttress.  It has very tall west and north sides.  The southeast (uphill) side is shorter and features a shallow, low-angle water chute.  Approach the base from the south side of Cleaver (fairly brush-free).  The first 25 feet of the chute are class five.  Continue class four and then class three to the top of the tallest summit, 150 feet from the start.  Descend by downclimbing or by a Pinnacles rappel.  FA Party:  Brad Young.  FA Date:  February 29, 2020.  Source(s):  Self, first ascentionist.

858.7  The Barber Pole  5.6  The Barber Pole is a previously unclimbed formation located on the ridge between Resurrection and Goat Rocks.  It is much closer to Goat (150 feet) than to Resurrection (250 yards).  Approach from the Juniper Canyon Trail, up to the notch on Resurrection’s south side (to this point, this is the same approach as for the climbing route Le Petit Mort).  From the high point of the notch leave Resurrection Rock moving left (south) gently uphill. Stay west (right) of several 10 to 30 foot high pinnacles, continuing to a level part of the ridge about 150 yards from the Resurrection Wall notch (The Barber Pole comes into view from this level area).  Continue another 100 yards to the north side of the formation.  The climbing route ascends a very prominent up-and-left ramp to the summit.  Start about 40 feet up and left of the ramp’s lowest point, moving straight up, 20 feet to a bolt.  Continue left on the ramp using a 3½ inch piece, slung knobs, and a fixed piton before reaching a second bolt 60 feet from the beginning of the climb.  More up and left movement leads past two more bolts to the route crux, a footwork-dependent traverse around a bulge.  Once past the bulge, clip a fifth bolt, move up to a sixth, and then climb up and left on easy ground to the summit and a two-bolt anchor, 120 feet from the start.  Descend by an 80 foot rappel to the ground (well to the left of the climb itself).  FA Party:  Brad Young, John Cook.  FA Date:  November 4, 2016.  Source(s):  Self, part of the first ascent party.

871.5  Prune Pinnacle - Regular Route 5.4   A climb that gives a whole new meaning to the name “Regular Route.”
Finding Prune Pinnacle: Prune Pinnacle is located just north of the Juniper Canyon Trail, higher on the trail than Yankee and Palisade Pinnacles, but lower than Chaos Crag. It is due south of much larger Teapot Dome (although don’t mistake Prune for the small pinnacle on which is located the route Tea Bag – Tea Bag is between Prune and Teapot). Hiking up the Juniper Canyon Trail, Prune is just north of the sixth switchback above Palisade Pinnacle. Coming down-trail from the Juniper Canyon/Tunnel Trail junction, this is the fourth switchback (the climbing route can be seen well from the switchback).
Approaching Regular Route: Approach by leaving the trail to the west (downhill) and then skirting north across the hillside for 100 feet (some brush and a few small trees). Reach an obvious, deep corridor of rock between Prune Pinnacle and the smaller formation to its right/uphill. The climb starts on the southeast toe of the formation, which makes up the left side of this corridor.
Climbing Regular Route: Begin climbing on the southeast toe of the formation. Move up 15 feet onto a broad shoulder of rock. Walk north along the shoulder to a notch between the main formation and a small lump of rock to the left (gear from small to three inches in a hole and a crack). The route’s first bolt is in the notch (there is a screw link attached to this bolt – consider having the follower use it to back-belay across the next, very loose section). An exposed traverse to and across a somewhat stepped ledge leads into a steep gully/corner. Climb this past a second bolt and past a cluster of small scrub oaks, into a larger notch and the route’s third bolt (consider making a belay here to avoid rope drag). From this notch, climb a short face to a sub-summit. Scramble across a narrow ridge to Prune Pinnacle’s true summit, 120 feet from the start (the top anchor is 10 feet below and on the west side of the true summit). Rappel 80 feet to a point near the start of the climb. FA Party: John Cook, Jon Cochran. FA Date: 12-31-17. Source(s):  Post by John Cook to Mud'nCrud forum, Quest for Mud (Special Edition), February 6, 2018.
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2009, 03:16:16 PM »

New addition today, The Wolf 5.7 R (see above).

New addition Feb 10, 2009, The Road to Bagalaar 5.8 R (see above).
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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2009, 02:24:56 AM »

Quote
24.1  The Road To Bagalaar 5.8 R

I heard about this one from Fabrizio. Sounds like you can continue the route upwards??
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2009, 10:06:01 AM »

That was the original intent to climb up to and out the 5 foot roof crack.  Upon reaching the ledge, the headwall and roof crack were deemed too Bagalaar to continue to the summit.  Thus the name "The Road to Bagalaar" 
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2009, 10:12:13 AM »

Newly reported route
Gavins blank " I forgot the name I will find it then at it here"
Rating not sure I have not climbed it. 
Start on Stupendous Man, pull the mantle then lead out to an old rusty quarter inch bolt.  Clip the bolt then tend up and left to a corner.  Place some ok gear in some quality Pinnacles Mud.   Move up and left toward Lithium, through the corner of the arch,  where there are some large knobs.  Clip the last bolt on Lithium and finish on Lithium.

I suppose I should wait to have all the information but I wanted to get this in before I forgot.

I heard of a variation where someone went straight up the face below Stupendous man, then pulled the mantle, (without clipping the bolt).
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2009, 10:19:16 AM »

Sounds like it might be a worthwhile route - especially if that old quarter incher was replaced.
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2009, 01:55:50 PM »



I heard of a variation where someone went straight up the face below Stupendous man, then pulled the mantle, (without clipping the bolt).

I heard the same or something similar.
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« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2009, 09:04:20 PM »

Is this the bolt just under the small roof/right facing corner (left of STMAN) then up the face to the bolted belay ledge?  I have thought about replacing it, whats the word on the route?  Seems possible to TR it before or to replace the bolt, the climbing looks hard around the corner.

I have looked at that line for a while and would be happy to "Tune it up"
Mucci
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« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2009, 09:38:20 PM »

That is the bolt.  Rap in from the bolts at the top of Lithium or Stupendous Man, or a tree on top.

  I think the route is 10 b/c.  Talk to Gavin to get the real name and the juicy details.  I heard the moves through the corner over the bulge are not that bad and kinda of fun.

I looks cool from the ground with the big jugs hanging out there to grab onto.
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2009, 03:27:28 PM »

Hey gang, thought I should finally get on this forum with some information on the climb between Stupendous Man and Lithium... Though I didn't see it in Brad's book, I assumed someone must have done it before, otherwise I would have added some details here earlier. If no one else has done it and mine was the first ascent (a couple months ago now), I called it "Tangent," probably 5.10a/b at this point. (Though a couple others mentioned "Gavin's Tangent" as a possibility... You be the judge!)

At any rate, looks like most folks have a sense of where it goes, though there are a couple variations from the ground. To lead it, start at Stupendous Man, go over the roof section, then clip up to the old quarter incher Brad mentioned. From there, follow the instructions from "My Name is Mud" above on May 11. From the rusty quarter inch bolt to the last bolt on Lithium, the best place for pro is midway, in the side-cling/under-cling move as you're stretching left... Given the potentially crumbly quality of the rock, a couple pieces are recommended! Using Metolius TCUs, I think yellow to red are usable, and possibly a bit smaller.

The variation start is good too, a bit more challenging (closer to 5.10b/c or so, I'd guess), but tougher to do on lead, probably safer on TR, due to the lack of good pro options until you're over the roof mantle. Start between Lithium and Stupendous Man on the thin face, climb up to the roof section but stay left of the usual moves for Stupendous Man, then over the roof to the rusty quarter inch bolt, and on up from there. The thin face start is pretty cool, I think. Iztok's friend Tomek (sp?) was the first to give the variation a go.

Both variations are good... The moves themselves aren't super hard, but definitely typify the "Pinnacles experience" of climbing on some potentially unstable exposed rock / knobs and wondering if they'll hold (and praying they do).

Hope that helps!

P.S. Redoing that rusty quarter inch bolt sounds like a great idea. Any takers?
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« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2009, 03:36:28 PM »

Brad -

I wasn't sure if you wanted me to provide details in the route list you have going according to your system above, or if you want to go ahead and do so. Let me know.

Gavin
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« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2009, 03:38:39 PM »

Thanks for the word Gavin, Going up sunday to replace that bolt and the right anchor bolt on "The Roof".

OHHHHHHHHHHHH it's gonna be hot!!!!!!!!!!!!
Mucci
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« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2009, 04:11:17 PM »

Gavin, I like "Gavin's Tangent." Take some credit where it is due. I'd put "possibly" or even "probably" after "FA" and before the details. Maybe it's been done and maybe someone placed the bolt and bailed. Or it was an aid route, or a girdle traverse. Et-cetera. No-one will ever know.

On formatting and the list above, I'll enter it later tonight, or you can as you want. I tried to develop the format to help some future dumb sap who does the 2023 edition of the book - I thought that a uniform format type of entry, listing all information then known might help prevent said future sap from having to chase all over hellangone looking for rumors. That plus I think it is quickly readable and understandable.

Well done.

And Josh, if you're there suffering and you've got time. both bolts on the upper part of Gutter are pretty bad. Thanks for spending time and $ to benefit all of us other climbers.

EDIT: I guess the way I set up the original list (as one entry), only I can add to that entry. So, yeah I'll try to add it in tonight or Sunday. Be sure to let me know if I miss on some details.
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« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2009, 06:48:07 PM »

Brad, sounds good in regards to posting a description, and thanks for the details... I'll check after it's posted.

Mucci, be careful in the heat! It's supposed to be over a hundred degrees the next few days! Yikes!

Gavin
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« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2009, 07:38:58 PM »

OK, Gavin, Dennis, there is a start. I tried to combine both your entries (plus my memory) into one concise listing. I didn't list variants, since most Pinns routes have a ton of the same. As always I've chosen the lower of two grades from a split grade. Also, I have no idea about stars, so make suggestions. Finally, the number, ending in ".9" seemed right given that it starts on Stupendous Man.  Gavin, I'm guessing on the FA date, and it sounds like it may have been before this year. Do you have anything more specific?

Next step (for me anyway) is to print it out in the same type style and font size as the Pinns Guide. Then glue it in the book. Then climb it next season.

Gavin, come on up to granite at least once this season. Buncha Pinns climbers can show you around the Sonora Pass areas.
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« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2009, 07:48:20 PM »

AH, 100 Degrees? Bring it on........Training for this years wall season!  I will try and replace all four, if not I will bump the Roof anchor till the fall. 

Have fun this weekend gentlemen,
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« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2009, 06:44:10 AM »

Brad, thanks for the update; sounds good to me. Okay, for FA, I'll throw out March 5, 2009 as the date, near as I can tell. I probably got on it at least a bit before that as well, but that date I can remember for certain.

About Sonora Pass: yeah, that sounds fun. I think Alacia and I should be passing through that way in July, but if that's too late I could probably find a way up earlier too. I'll let you know.
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« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2009, 07:29:34 PM »

107 degrees of Bolt Manipulation

Oh man was it hot at the Pinns Today!  Started at "Gavins Tangent", Placed a SS 3/8 x 3.25 w/ SS Fixe Hanger 2" left and 3" above the Old buttonhead.  The clipping stance was not altered.  
Then came the most punishing bolt removal of my life, Couldn't get the Tuning fork under the hanger (concaved placement).  Out came the 4 foot Modified Crowbar!  It became apparent very quickly how much I have to learn about removal.  It felt as if I was cast into Hell for a hard day of labor, then spit out into a hot spring every 29 minutes just to make sure I was Properly suffering!  After 2 hours of a knuckle wrecking crowbar party, the sucker popped out! Good lookin bolt if I may say so, Could still see original metal that had not rusted through.  Whipped out my cake batter and talus mix and concocted a patch that mom would be proud of!

Did some moves on the fixed line, breaking out and left under the roof was fun and the moves didn't seem that bad, .9?  Looks like a great line.  Another variation one might choose is moving out and right from the roof, up the RFC which is wide, No pro above but could TR no problem.

Things I learned while replacing 1 bolt in 3 hours:
It's hard to start at the top and go down (got off route looking for the Gutter sorry Brad)
Never go to Pinns when it is over 100 degrees!
My method of removal is not the quickest.
Gather Many types of gravel/talus/dirt/munge for fine tuning the patch.
Yates bolt bags are the Best!

Hope somebody sends this thing, after all it has natural pro which is a plus in my book.
Mucci

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« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2009, 09:11:51 PM »

Nice, Josh. Thanks for the work.
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